CA2188539A1 - Process and device for tracing an ultrasound field - Google Patents

Process and device for tracing an ultrasound field

Info

Publication number
CA2188539A1
CA2188539A1 CA 2188539 CA2188539A CA2188539A1 CA 2188539 A1 CA2188539 A1 CA 2188539A1 CA 2188539 CA2188539 CA 2188539 CA 2188539 A CA2188539 A CA 2188539A CA 2188539 A1 CA2188539 A1 CA 2188539A1
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
ultrasound
waveguides
transducer
waves
accordance
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
CA 2188539
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Wieslaw Bicz
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Sonident Anstalt Liechtensteinischen Rechts
Original Assignee
Wieslaw Bicz
Sonident Anstalt Liechtensteinischen Rechts
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to DE4414081A priority Critical patent/DE4414081C1/en
Priority to DEP4414081.9 priority
Priority to US08/349,880 priority patent/US5589636A/en
Priority to US08/349,880 priority
Application filed by Wieslaw Bicz, Sonident Anstalt Liechtensteinischen Rechts filed Critical Wieslaw Bicz
Publication of CA2188539A1 publication Critical patent/CA2188539A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10KSOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES; METHODS OR DEVICES FOR PROTECTING AGAINST, OR FOR DAMPING, NOISE OR OTHER ACOUSTIC WAVES IN GENERAL; ACOUSTICS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10K11/00Methods or devices for transmitting, conducting or directing sound in general; Methods or devices for protecting against, or for damping, noise or other acoustic waves in general
    • G10K11/18Methods or devices for transmitting, conducting, or directing sound
    • G10K11/24Methods or devices for transmitting, conducting, or directing sound for conducting sound through solid bodies, e.g. wires
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01HMEASUREMENT OF MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS OR ULTRASONIC, SONIC OR INFRASONIC WAVES
    • G01H3/00Measuring characteristics of vibrations by using a detector in a fluid
    • G01H3/10Amplitude; Power
    • G01H3/12Amplitude; Power by electric means
    • G01H3/125Amplitude; Power by electric means for representing acoustic field distribution

Abstract

The invention refers to a process and a deviee to scan an ultrasound field. The methods known up to now require a large number of transducers in order to be able to record the non-transmitted ultrasound waves from all directions.
In accordance with this invention, the number of ultra-sound transducers is reduced to one or to very few by the waves coming from different directions being subjected to different measures to lengthen their paths.

Description

Translation Sonident Company under Liechtenstein Law "Process and Device to Scan an Ultrasound Field~

The invention refers to a process and a device to scan an ultrasound field.

The scanning of ultrasound fields, for example as they are [Translator: sic] used to verify the efficiency of ultrasound fields or in devices to recognize surfaces and surface-near structures of objects, has been carried out up to now by means of transducers, which convert the ultrasound waves sent back by the object to be measured into electric signals and forward them to be evaluated.
Since the intensity of the ultrasound waves emitted or back-scattered and reflected respectively varies depending on the efficiency of the ultrasound source or on the structure of the object to be studied, it is necessary to use numerous transducers in order to be able to record the waves returned in all directions. It has become clear that a circular arrangement of a large number of transducers, circa 250 with a diameter of 1 mm, allows for adequa-l,e measurement of the ultrasound waves emitted or sent back as the case may be.
The large number of transducers necessary with t;he known devices makes it complicated and expensive to arrange them, so that on this basis mass production of these devices to scan ultrasound fields is unsuitable.

Therefore the goal of the invention is to make it possible to reduce the number of transducers used.

Based on the invention it is proposed to proceed in accordance with the main claim. As a result the ultrasound waves have different dimensions, their sound propagation times are subject to measures to increase them, and the sound waves, whether produced originally in the medium or reflected or collected dispersed over various exit points and then fed one by one to a single or very few trans-ducers on paths of varying lengths. In this proces~ use is made of the fact that it is possible in the ultrasound field to have the sound waves arrive one by one temporally at a single transducer or at very few transducers by mak-ing use of different paths which are forced on the sound waves from different directions and increase their sound propagation times.

The number of transducers can be reduced considerably in this way.

The path of the sound waves coming from the individual directions can be increased in different ways. The ultra-sound waves coming from different directions can be picked up by a set of mirrors arranged at different distances and 2 1 8853~

at different places with respect to the medium or an object respectively which emits them, this picking-up being done in such a way that the waves have to travel sound propagation times of different lengths to a single or very few transducers. Another method is that a trans-ducer is connected with the points to be scanned in the ultrasound field via waveguides having different sound propagation times.

The devices to implement the process using a mirror arrangement consist of mirrors located in each case oppo-site to the points to be scanned in the ultrasound field and distributed and oriented so that the ultrasound waves load the transducer with different sound propagation times via the mirrors. Where waveguides are used, the ultrasound waves at the points to be scanned are fed into the wave-guides via collection devices and fed to one or more trans-ducers for purposes of evaluation. The different sound propagation times can be achieved either with similar wave-guides of different lengths or with~waveguides of the same length having different sound propagation times per time unit. Waveguides with different sound propagation times can also be achieved by first feeding the ultrasound waves into waveguides of the same length which are then fed one by one to a common channel. Surprisingly, it has been shown that the mirrors or waveguides can be placed in a liquid medium. The waveguides can also be arranged in a solid material.

be obtained by first feeding the ultrasound waves into waveguides of the same length which are then fed on after the other to a common channel. Surprisingly, it has been shown that the mirrors or waveguides can be placed in a liquid medium. The waveguides can also be arranged in a solid material.

The drawings illustrated devices which can be imple-mented with the inventive process. They illustrate as follows:
Fig. 1 a device in which the increase in path is achieved by means of a set of mirrors, Fig. 2 a diagrammatic presentation of waveguides with different lengths, Fig. 3 a modification of the device illustrated in Fig.
2.
Fig. 1 illustrates the increase in the path of ultra-sound waves by means of a set of differently arranged mirrors. Reference number 1 designates an ultrasound transmitter. The waves emitted by transmitter 1 strike a plate 2 made of glass, which, for example can also be equipped with an object. The waves coming from the indi-vidual points on the plate or the object respectively are directed from the base plate to the mirrors 3 and 4 and are reflected from there one after another to the trans-ducer 5. Consequently, the waves move from the transmitter 1 via the plate 2 and the mirror 3 Revised page Fig. 2 illustrates the use of waveguides. Ultrasound waves of whatever origin radiating from the medium 21, which can be the base plate for some object for example, are directed to collection devices 23 located on the medium 21 and, therefore, fed to the waveguides a to h connected to them. These waveguides are of varying lengths and have different sound propagation times as a result. As is clear from the drawing, a is the shortest and h the longest waveguide. It has become evident that the wave-guides should differ in length by preferably 1 m in deter-mining fingerprints. Therefore, waveguide b is 1 m longer than a and c is 1 m longer than b and so on. All wave-guides discharge into the transducer 22. The difference in the waveguides of about 1 m is sufficient in the case of the application mentioned to direct, in a differentiated manner, the waves coming from the individual directions to the transducer 22, which then forwards the appropriate signals. In this way the waves sent back in different directions are evaluated separately from one another. The difference in length of the individual waveguides is to be adjusted to the different objects to be recorded in each case. In place of the arrangement with waveguides of dif-ferent lengths, waveguides of the same length may be util-ized which have different sound propagation times per time unit. These different sound propagation times can also be achieved through waveguides with thicker cross-sections or waveguides made of different materials.

Fig. 3 illustrates a modification of Fig. 2. In it the waves emitted by the medium 31 are fed to waveguides 36 of the same length via collection devices (33) arranged in 6 21 8853q different directions. The waveguides 36 discharge one by one into a common waveguide 34, which is connected to the transducer 32. The distance between the discharge points 35 of the individual waveguides 36 is such that the sig-nals from the individual waveguides 36 reach the trans-ducer 32 separated from one another and one after another for purposes of forwarding the appropriate signals.

The designs in Figures 1, 2 , and 3 can be arranged in a liquid, e.g. water.

It has become evident that, based on Figures 2 and 3, the waveguides can be made of tubes filled with liquid or of a sleeve of some kind or of a solid material, such as glass or metal.

- Patent Claims -

Claims (8)

1. Process for the local scanning of an ultrasound field existing in a medium at a specific time by means of a transducer (5; 22; 32) c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that the ultrasound waves exiting the medium (2, 21, 31) are subjected to measures which increase their sound propagation times from their exit areas on and are then fed to the transducer (5; 22; 32).
2. Device to implement the process under Claim 1 c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that mirrors (3, 4) are located at the points of the ultrasound field which are to be scanned, these mir-rors being distributed and oriented so that the ultra-sound waves load the transducer (5) with different sound propagation times via the mirrors (3, 4).
3. Device to implement the process under Claim 1 c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that the transducer (22, 32) is connected with the points of the ultrasound field which are to be scanned by means of waveguides (a, ... h); 36, 34) having different sound propagation times.
4. Device in accordance with Claim 3 c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that the ultrasound waves to the points to be scanned can be fed to the waveguides (a, ... h; 36, 34) by means of collection devices (23).
5. Device in accordance with Claim 4 c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that waveguide sections (36) of the same length are connected with the collection devices and that the ends of the waveguide sections (36) facing away from the collection devices are connected to a common wave-guide (34), one end of which loads the transducer (32), at different longitudinal positions.
6. Device in accordance with Claims 3 to 5 c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that waveguides (a, ... h; 36) contain liquid.
7. Device in accordance with Claims 3 to 5 c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that waveguides (a, ... h; 36, 34) are made from a solid material.
8. Device in accordance with Claims 2 to 7 c h a r a c t e r i z e d b y t h e f a c t that further transducers - analogously to the trans-ducer (5; 22; 32) - are connected to the ultrasound field.
CA 2188539 1994-04-22 1995-04-19 Process and device for tracing an ultrasound field Abandoned CA2188539A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE4414081A DE4414081C1 (en) 1994-04-22 1994-04-22 Local ultrasound field scanning method e.g. for surface or sub-surface structure probe
DEP4414081.9 1994-04-22
US08/349,880 US5589636A (en) 1994-04-22 1994-12-06 Method of and apparatus for the detection of an ultrasonic field
US08/349,880 1994-12-06

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA2188539A1 true CA2188539A1 (en) 1995-11-02

Family

ID=25935860

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 2188539 Abandoned CA2188539A1 (en) 1994-04-22 1995-04-19 Process and device for tracing an ultrasound field

Country Status (5)

Country Link
EP (1) EP0756740B1 (en)
JP (1) JPH10501614A (en)
CA (1) CA2188539A1 (en)
PL (1) PL177677B1 (en)
WO (1) WO1995029478A1 (en)

Family Cites Families (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0144761A3 (en) * 1983-11-08 1987-03-25 Honeywell Inc. Ultrasonic sensor
DE3501838A1 (en) * 1985-01-21 1986-07-24 Siemens Ag DEVICE FOR THE GENERATION OF TIMED SHOCK SHAFTS
GB2170906B (en) * 1985-02-13 1988-05-11 Gen Electric Co Plc Sound modification for scanning purposes
FR2616229B1 (en) * 1987-06-04 1989-12-29 Labo Electronique Physique ULTRASONIC ECHOGRAPH USING AT LEAST ONE PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCER WITH WHICH A RANDOM PHASE SCREEN IS ASSOCIATED

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP0756740A1 (en) 1997-02-05
PL177677B1 (en) 1999-12-31
JPH10501614A (en) 1998-02-10
EP0756740B1 (en) 1998-12-30
PL316761A1 (en) 1997-02-03
WO1995029478A1 (en) 1995-11-02

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