Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

High melt flow polypropylene medical film

Info

Publication number
CA2047148C
CA2047148C CA 2047148 CA2047148A CA2047148C CA 2047148 C CA2047148 C CA 2047148C CA 2047148 CA2047148 CA 2047148 CA 2047148 A CA2047148 A CA 2047148A CA 2047148 C CA2047148 C CA 2047148C
Authority
CA
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
copolymer
ethylene
melt
layer
film
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
CA 2047148
Other languages
French (fr)
Other versions
CA2047148A1 (en )
Inventor
Walter B. Mueller
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Cryovac Inc
Original Assignee
Cryovac Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/32Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin comprising polyolefins
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/06Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material
    • B32B27/08Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material of synthetic resin
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/30Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin comprising vinyl (co)polymers; comprising acrylic (co)polymers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/36Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin comprising polyesters
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B7/00Layered products characterised by the relation between layers, i.e. products comprising layers having different physical properties and products characterised by the interconnection of layers
    • B32B7/04Layered products characterised by the relation between layers, i.e. products comprising layers having different physical properties and products characterised by the interconnection of layers characterised by the connection of layers
    • B32B7/12Layered products characterised by the relation between layers, i.e. products comprising layers having different physical properties and products characterised by the interconnection of layers characterised by the connection of layers using an adhesive, i.e. any interposed material having adhesive or bonding properties
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L23/00Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • C08L23/02Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers not modified by chemical after-treatment
    • C08L23/10Homopolymers or copolymers of propene
    • C08L23/14Copolymers of propene
    • C08L23/142Copolymers of propene at least partially crystalline copolymers of propene with other olefins
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09JADHESIVES; NON-MECHANICAL ASPECTS OF ADHESIVE PROCESSES IN GENERAL; ADHESIVE PROCESSES NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; USE OF MATERIALS AS ADHESIVES
    • C09J123/00Adhesives based on homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Adhesives based on derivatives of such polymers
    • C09J123/02Adhesives based on homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Adhesives based on derivatives of such polymers not modified by chemical after-treatment
    • C09J123/10Homopolymers or copolymers of propene
    • C09J123/14Copolymers of propene
    • C09J123/142Copolymers of propene at least partially crystalline copolymers of propene with other olefins
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J1/00Containers specially adapted for medical or pharmaceutical purposes
    • A61J1/05Containers specially adapted for medical or pharmaceutical purposes for collecting, storing or administering blood, plasma or medical fluids ; Infusion or perfusion containers
    • A61J1/10Bag-type containers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/50Properties of the layers or laminate having particular mechanical properties
    • B32B2307/558Impact strength, toughness
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2331/00Polyvinylesters
    • B32B2331/04Polymers of vinyl acetate, e.g. PVA
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2367/00Polyesters, e.g. PET, i.e. polyethylene terephthalate
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2535/00Medical equipment, e.g. bandage, prostheses, catheter
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L23/00Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • C08L23/02Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers not modified by chemical after-treatment
    • C08L23/04Homopolymers or copolymers of ethene
    • C08L23/06Polyethene
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L23/00Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • C08L23/02Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers not modified by chemical after-treatment
    • C08L23/04Homopolymers or copolymers of ethene
    • C08L23/08Copolymers of ethene
    • C08L23/0846Copolymers of ethene with unsaturated hydrocarbons containing other atoms than carbon or hydrogen atoms
    • C08L23/0853Vinylacetate
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L53/00Compositions of block copolymers containing at least one sequence of a polymer obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • C08L53/02Compositions of block copolymers containing at least one sequence of a polymer obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers of vinyl-aromatic monomers and conjugated dienes
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L67/00Compositions of polyesters obtained by reactions forming a carboxylic ester link in the main chain; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/13Hollow or container type article [e.g., tube, vase, etc.]
    • Y10T428/1334Nonself-supporting tubular film or bag [e.g., pouch, envelope, packet, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24355Continuous and nonuniform or irregular surface on layer or component [e.g., roofing, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31725Of polyamide
    • Y10T428/31739Nylon type
    • Y10T428/31743Next to addition polymer from unsaturated monomer[s]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31725Of polyamide
    • Y10T428/31739Nylon type
    • Y10T428/31743Next to addition polymer from unsaturated monomer[s]
    • Y10T428/31746Polymer of monoethylenically unsaturated hydrocarbon
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31725Of polyamide
    • Y10T428/3175Next to addition polymer from unsaturated monomer[s]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31725Of polyamide
    • Y10T428/3175Next to addition polymer from unsaturated monomer[s]
    • Y10T428/31757Polymer of monoethylenically unsaturated hydrocarbon
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31786Of polyester [e.g., alkyd, etc.]
    • Y10T428/31797Next to addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31909Next to second addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31913Monoolefin polymer
    • Y10T428/31917Next to polyene polymer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31909Next to second addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31924Including polyene monomers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31909Next to second addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31928Ester, halide or nitrile of addition polymer
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31931Polyene monomer-containing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31855Of addition polymer from unsaturated monomers
    • Y10T428/31935Ester, halide or nitrile of addition polymer

Abstract

An impact resistant film suitable for making medical solution pouches generally includes an interior layer of a polyolefin such as an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, very low density polyethylene or blends thereof; and outer layers of a high melt flow propylene homopolymer or copolymer. At least one of the outer layers also includes an elastomer such as a styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer. A flexible copolyester can be substituted for one of the outer high melt flow polymer layers. Additional interior layers can also be incorporated in the film structure.

Description

High Melt Flow Polypropylene Medical Film This invention relates to autoclavable flexible films suitable for the packaging of medical solutions.
Currently, it is common medical practice to supply .liquids such as medical solutions for parenteral administration in the form of dispos-able, flexible pouches. These pauches should be characterized by collaps-ibility, transparency, and adequate mechanical strength. They must also be able to resist the relatively high temperatures required for heat ster-ilization of their contents, for example in an autoclave. Typically, medical solutions and the like are autoclaved at about 253°F fox periods of 15 to 30 minutes.
Presently, such flexible pouches a:re typically made from a highly plasticized polyvinyl chloride. While meeting the requirements mentioned above, polyvinyl chloride may have some undesirable properties for use as a medical solution pouch because of the possibility of migra-tion of plasticizer from the polyvinyl chloride into 'the medical solution or the other contents of the pouch so that the solution may become contami-nated by potentially toxic material: A question has also arisen concern-ing whether PVC is adequately chemically neutral to medical solutions. It has also been found that polyvinyl chloride becomes brittle at relatively low temperatures.
Embrittlement and stress-cracking, particularly of the outer surface of medical pouches, has been found to occur in other non-PVC pouch-es. It is desirable to provide a pouch for the packaging of medical solu ~/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

tons which substantially reduces or eliminates stress-cracking and embrittlement of the pouch material.
Of interest is U.S. Patent 4,401,536 issued to Lundell et al which discloses the use of a blend of medical grade radiation-stabilized polypropylene and a copolymer of ethylene and a comonomer selected :From the group consisting of vinyl esters of saturated carboxylic acids and alkyl esters of alpha, beta ethylenically unsaturated carboxylic acids, the blend being irradiated.
Also of interest is U.S. Patent 4,643,926 issued to Mueller which discloses a flexible film for medical solution pouches generally including a sealant layer of ethylene propylene copolymer, modified ethylene propylene copolymer, or flexible copolyester; one or more interi-or layers including elastomeric polymeric materials such as very low densi-ty polyethylene; and an outer layer of ethylene propylene copolymer or a flexible copolyester.
O.f interest is EP 228 819 (Raniere et al) disclosing a multiple layer film suitable for. packaging solutions used for medical services, having three layers including a sealant layer having polypropylene polymer blended with an elastomeric styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer.
OBJECTS
Tt is an object of the present invention to provide a film suitable for the packaging of medical solutions, the film capable of pro-duction without the need for sacrificial layers.
It is an object of the present invention to provide a film suitable for the packaging of medical solutions, the film having good impact resistance and flexibility.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a film suitable for the packaging of medical solutions characterized by good 4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/0'7/03/91/09:53:03 AM

1~~~:~.
optical properties and a low degree of initial haze (blushing) after autoclaving of the package.
Still another object of the present invention is to provide a film suitable for the packaging of medical solutions characterized by high mechanical strength.
DEFINITIONS
The term "high melt flow" is used herein to indicate a melt flow of greater than about 5 grams/10 minutes and less than about 15 grams/10 minutes (ASTM D 1238, Condition L). Melt. flow is generally con-sidered to be inversely proportional to melt viscosity and molecular weight.
The terms "flexible" and the like and "elastomeric" and the like are used herein to define specific polymeric materials as well as characteristics of a resulting pouch or bag whereby improved flexibility and/or collapsibility of the pouch or bag is obtained by the use of these specific polymeric materials. Flexible materials may be characterized by a modulus of preferably less than 50,000 PSI (ASTM D-882-81) and more preferably less than 40,000 PST (ASTM D-882-81).
The 'term "film" and the like refers to a thermoplastic material suitable for packaging and having one or more layers of polymeric materi-als which may be bonded by any suitable means well known in the art.
The term "polymer", "polymeric", and the like, unless specifi-cally defined or otherwise limited, generally includes homopolymers, copolymers and terpolymers and blends and modifications thereof.
The term "interior" and the like is used herein to refer to a layer of a multilayer film which is not a skin or surface layer, or sealant layer, of the film.
4/901005.1/OLDfLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

~'he term "melt index" is used herein as the amount, in grams, of a thermoplastic resin which can be forced through a given orifice under a specified pressure and temperature within 10 minutes. The value should be determined in accordance with ASTM D 1238-82, Condition E.
The term "ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer" (EVA) is used here-in to refer to a copolymer formed from ethylene and vinyl acetate monomers wherein the ethylene derived units in the copolymer are present in major amounts and the vinyl acetate derived units in the copolymer are present in minor amounts.
The term "e-thylene propylene copolymer" (EPC) is used herein to refer to a copolymer formed of propylene monomer and minor amounts, usual-ly less than 10% and preferably less than 6% by weight, of ethylene comonomer. This may be a high meli: flow EPC, although it does not have to be unless designated as such in this specification or the claims attached hereto.
The term "copolyester" and the like is applied to polyesters synthesized from more than one diol and a dibasic acid. Copolyesters as used herein may also be characterized as copolymers of polyether and poly-ethylene -te.rephthalate. More preferably copolyesters as used herein may be characterized as polymeric materials derived from 1,4 cyclohexane dimethanol, 1,4 cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid, and polytetramethylene glycol ether, or equivalents of any of 'the above, as reactants.
The 'term "modified'° and the like is used herein to refer to a polymeric material in which some or all of the substituents are replaced by other materials, providing a change in properties such as improved impact resistance, flexibility or elastomeric properties. In the case of modified ethylene propylene copolymer, the modification is provided by a rubbery block copolymer such as commercially available under the trademark Kraton from the Shell Chemical Company.
The terms "elastomer" and the like are used herein to mean a elastomeric, rubbery or flexible material suitable far use in one or more 4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

layers of the present invention. Preferred elastomers are styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer (SEBS), styrene butadiene styrene copolymer (SBS), styrene isoprene styrene copolymer (SIS), and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR).
The term "polyolefin" is used herein to refer to olefin poly-mers and copolymers, especially ethylene polymers and copolymers, and to polymeric materials having at least one olefinic comonomer, such as ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
SUhIMARY OF THE INVENTION
An impact resistant film in accordance with the invention com-prises two outer layers each comprising a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer; and an interior layer disposed between the two outer layers, and comprising an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA), ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer (EMR), or blends thereof; at least one of the outer layers also including an elastomer.
Alternatively, an impact resistant film comprises a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; a second outer layer comprising a copolyester; and a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the first and sec-ond outer layers.
In another aspect of the invention, an impact resistant film comprises a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; a second outer layer com-prising a copolyester; an interior layer comprising an ethylene vinyl ace-tate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend thereof;
and a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the interior layer to the second outer layer.
In yet another aspect of the invention, an impact resistant film comprises a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; a second outer layer com-4/901005.1/OLDFhDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

prising a copolyester; a central layer comprising a polyolefin; and polymeric adhesive layers disposed between and adhering 'the respective outer layers to the central layer.
Alternatively, an impact resistant film comprises two outer layers each comprising a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer; a central layer comprising a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer; an interior layer disposed between each of the two outer layers and the central layer respectively and comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1; and at least one of the outer layers also including an elastomer.
A modification of the abode is an impact resistant film com-prising two outer layers each comprising a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer; a central layer comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1; an interior layer disposed between each of the two outer layers and the central layer respec-tively and comprising a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer; and at least one of the outer layers also including an elastomer.
In still another aspect of the invention, an impact resistant film comprises a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; a second outer layer com-prising a copolyester; a central layer comprising a polyolefin; an inte-rior layer disposed between the first outer layer and 'the central layer, and comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index great-er than about 1; and a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the copolyester layer to the central layer.
In yet another aspect of the invention, an impact resistant film comprises a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; a second outer layer com-prising a copolyester; a central layer comprising a polyolefin; an interi-or layer disposed between each of the two outer layers and the central layer respectively and comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having 4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/92/09:53:03 AM

~~'~~~.~~ a ,:~ melt index greater than about 1; and a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the copolyester layer to an interior layer.
One additional example of an impact resistant film comprises a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; a second outer layer comprising a copolyester; a central layer comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend thereof; an interior layer disposed between the first outer layer and the central layer and compris-ing a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer; and a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the copolyester layer to the central layer.
The present invention also includes a method of making an im-pact resistant film comprising providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding a first melt stream of the blend, a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer and ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, and a third melt stream of high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer optional-ly blended with the elastomer, to form a film.
An alternative method of making an impact resistant film com-prises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding a first melt stream of the blend, a second melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and a third melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
Another aspect of the method comprises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; extruding a first melt stream of the blend, a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer and ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, a third melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and a fourth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
~~/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 ANA

?~~"~~~ ~~
In still another aspect of the invention, a method of making an impact resis'tan't film comprises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding a first melt stream of the blend, a second melt stream of a polyolefin, a third melt stream of a copolyester, and a melt stream of a polymeric adhesive dis-posed between each of the first and second melt streams, and -the second and third melt streams respectively, to form a film.
In yet another aspect of the invention, a method of making an impact resistant film comprises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding the blend as a first melt stream, a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater -than about 1, a. central melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, a fourth melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, and a fifth melt stream of high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer optionally blended with the elastomer, to form a film.
In still another aspect of the invention, a method of making an impact resistant film comprises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding a first melt stream of the blend, a second melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, a central melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, a fourth melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, and a fifth melt stream of high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer optional-ly blended with the elastomer, to form a film.
In another aspect of 'the invent.ian, a method of making an im-pact resistant film comprises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding a first melt stream of the blend, a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, a central melt stream of a polyolefin, a fourth melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and a fifth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

~~~v:~
In still. anothen aspect of the invention, a method of making an impact resistant film comprises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding a first melt stream of the blend, a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, a third melt stream of a polyolefin, a fourth melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, and a fifth melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and a sixth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
An additional embodiment of a method of making an impact resis-tant film comprises providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and extruding a first melt stream of the blend; a second melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer; a third melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer and ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer; a fourth melt stream of a polymeric adhesive; and a fifth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
BRIEF DESCRTPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is a schematic cross-section of a film made in accor-dance with the invention;
FIG. 2 is a schematic cross-section of another film made in accordance with the invention;
FIG. 3 is a schematic cross-section of yet another film made in accordance with 'the present invention;
FIG. 4 is a schematic cross-section of still another film made in accordance with the present invention;
FIG. 5 is a schematic cross-section of another film made in accordance with the present invention;
4/901005.1/ULDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

~~~"1~.~~~
FIG. 5a is a schematic cross-section of an alternative film made in accordance with 'the present invention;
FIG. 5b is a schematic cross-section of another alternative film made in accordance with the present invention; and FIG. 6 is a schematic cross-section of yet another film made in accordance with the present invention.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
E'igure 1 shows a three layer impact resistant film 1 in accor-dance with the ,present invention. Sealant layer 10 comprises a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer (EPC) and an elastomer such as a styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer (SEBS). A suitable EPC
resin is 2 9550 from Fina, or PLTD 665 fram Exxon. The Fina material has an ethylene content of about 6.0%. Both EPC resins have a melt flow of about 10 grams/10 minutes (ASTM D 1238, Condition L). Other high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymers, and polypropylenes (PP) may be used.
The elastomer is preferably a styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer (SEBS). The SEBS is preferably Kraton G 1652. This particular material may be regarded as a thermoplastic rubber, and also as a block copolymer with polystyrene end blocks and a rubbery polyethylene butylene mid-block. A preferred blend range fox sealant layer 10 includes between about 70% and 95% high melt flow EPC and between about 5% and 30% of an elastomer.
Other suitable elastomers for sealant layer 10 include styrene butadiene styrene copolymer, styrene isoprene styrene copolymer, and ethylene propylene rubber.
Although outer layer 14 may be identical to sealant layer 10 in terms of composition and thickness, these layers may differ depending on the particular end use. For example, the inner sealant layer 10 may have 20% elastomer to enhance impact resistance, while outer layer 14 may have only 10% elastomer. Elastomers such as SEBS adversely affect optics to 4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM
, some extent. Having a higher % elastomer in the sealant layer instead of the outer layer masks to some extent 'the loss in optical quality.
Outer layer 14 can also comprise a high melt flow EPC without any blended elastomer.
As an alternative, sealant layer 10 can comprise a high melt flow EPC without any blended elastomer, and outer layer 14 can comprise a blend of high melt flow EPC and an elastomer. Thus, elastomer can be present as a blend material in one or both outer layers of the present film.
The blend in outer layers 10 and/or 14 is preferably between 70% and 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer, and 5% to 30% by weight of elastomers such as styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer.
Interior layer 12, disposed between the two outer layers 10 and 14, comprises ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA), ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer (EMA), or blends of EVA and EMA. Preferably, 'the EVA
has a vinyl acetate content of between about 18% and 35% by weight of the EVA. Even more preferably, the EVA has a vinyl acetate content of about 28% by weight of the EVA. Several commercially available EVA resins are suitable for intermediate layer 12. These include Elvax 3175 having a melt index of 6 and a 28% vinyl acetate content by weight of the EVA.
Also useful is Elvax 3182, a 3 melt index resin with a vinyl acetate con-tent of about 28% by weight of the EVA. Both of these resins are avail-able from du Pont. Additionally, Exxon 767.36 (2.5 melt index, 30% vinyl acetate) and Exxon 760.36 (3 melt index, 27.50 vinyl acetate) are also suitable for intermediate layer 12. The intermediate layer 12 comprises preferably between 60 and 90% and more preferably about 80% of the total film thickness exclusive of sacrificial layers to be described hereafter.
Coextruding prior film structures, with differences in viscosi-ty of the respective resins can make eoextrusion difficult to perform satisfactorily. For example, severe melt ripples can sometimes result.
In these situations, an additional outer layer of for example low density 4/901005.1/OL17FLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

polyethylene is adhered to each of the outer layers. These additional layers function as sacrificial layers which are stripped away after the coextruded film has been produced. This allows the blend layers to func-tion as sealant layers if necessary.
The present invemtiorx eliminates the need for sacrificial lay-ers by providing a high melt flow EPC which more closely matches the vis-cosity of for example relatively thick internal EVA layers.
In an alternative embodiment for Figure 1, between about 700 and 950 of a high melt flow EPC is blended with between about 5 and 30~ of an elastomer such as SEBS. This blend is coextruded with a flexible copolyester such as the Ecdelr" 9967 material described below, along with a polymeric adhesive (such as those described below) which is disposed be-tween and serves to bond 'the blend layer to 'the flexible copolyester lay-er. In this alternative embodiment, the central polymeric adhesive layer is preferably a thin layer. (relative to the two~ outer layers), compared with the relatively 'thick central layer 12 as depicted in Figure 1.
Figure 2 shows a four layer film made in accordance with the present invention. Outer layer 26 is preferably a blend of high melt flow EPC and the elastomer material described for outer layers 10 and 14 of. 'the three layer structure.
Interior layer 24 comprises an EVA, EMA, or blends of EVA and EMA such as those described earlier. The second outer layer 20 is a flexi-ble copolyester.
Adhesive layer 22 is a polymeric adhesive such as a modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer or modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer. Certain ethylene unsaturated ester copolymers, unmodified, may also be suitable for layer 22 in order to bond the interior EVA layer 24 to outer copolyester layer 20.
In addition, other polymeric adhesive materials may be suitable for layer 22 as well as the adhesive layers of other embodiments of the 4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

~?'~ ~ t~~
present invention. 'Phe choice of these adhesive materials depends on the selection of resins for the remaining layers of the film structure, in particular the resin layers which will be bonded by the adhesive layer.
These additional adhesives are preferably chemically modified adhesives, often with acid or acid anhydride functionalities, and include chemically modified versions of the following: linear low density polyethylene, very low density polyethylene, high density polyethylene and polypropylene.
Suitable chemically modified adhesives include BynelT" E 361 available from du Pont, and Plexarzm 3382 available from Quantum/USI. The Bynel E 361 material is an EVA based polymeric adhesive with malefic anhydride graft copolymer. The Plexar 3382 material is a EMA based chemi-cally modified polymeric adhesive with malefic anhydride graft copolymer.
Also suitable for layer 22 is modified styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer available from Shell Chemical Company as Kraton0 FG 1901X rubber.
Figure 3 shows a Five layer film 3 substantially like the four layer film described earlier, but with an additional layer 36 of a polymeric adhesive such as a modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer or a modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer. Layer 36 can also com-prise one or more of the adhesives described above for Fig. 2. Layer 36 can also comprise a blend of ethylene propylene copolymer and very low density polyethylene. A preferred blend is 50% EPC and 50% VLDPE. Thus, layer 38 of Figure 3 corresponds to layer 26 of Figure 2, layer 34 of Figure 3 corresponds to layer 24 of Figure 2, layer 32 of Figure 3 corre-sponds to layer 22 of Figure 2, and layer 30 of Figure 3 corresponds to layer 20 of Figure 2.
The outer layers 30 of Figure 3 and 20 of Figure 2. are a flexi-ble copolyester.
More preferably, a copolymer of polyether and polyethylene terephthalate, such as Eastman Ecde1 9965 from Eastman Chemical Products, Inc. is used for outer layers 30 and 20. Other suitable flexible 4/901005.1/OLDP'LDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

copolyesters are Ecdel 9966 and Ecdel 9967 all available from Eastman.
These particular copolyesters are characterized by inherent viscosities ranging from 1.05 to 1.28, and by the use of 1,4 cyclohexane dimethanol, 1,4 cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid, and polytetramethylene glycol ether as reactants in producing the flexible copolyester resins.
Various polymeric materia~s or blends of materials may be used for adhesive layers 32, 36 and 22 provided that the material used imparts sufficient adhesion between outer layers and the central or interior polyolefin layer. When a flexible copolyester is used for outer layer 30, the preferred material for layer 32 is a chemically modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer with a carboxylic acid or acid anhydride functionality. An especially preferred commercial resin is Plexar 3382 available from Quantum.
Other suitable commercial resins are Bynel E162 and Bynel E361, bath chemically modified EVA materials available from du Pont.
The central layer 34 of Fig. 3 comprises a polyolefin and more preferably an EVA such as those described earlier, or a very low density polyethylene (VLDPE) such as DEFD 1362 available from Union Carbide.
Figure 4 shows an alternative embodiment being a five layer film 4. In applications where improved melt strength is required, the film described for Figure 1 can be further improved by introducing a frac-tional melt index EVA into the center of the structure so that layer 46 of Figure 4 is a fractional melt index (i.e. less 'than 1.0 melt index) EVA, and layers 48 and 44 disposed on either side of the layer 46, comprise the high vinyl acetate, high (greater than 1.0) melt index EVA described earli-er for central layer 12. The total EVA content of this alternative embodi-ment is still preferably between 60% and 90a, and more preferably about 80% of the total film thickness. Examples of a fractional melt index EVA
are Elvax 3135 and 3165, both available from du Pont.
In one variation of this alternative embodiment, the central layers 44, 46, and 48 may be reversed. In this variation, 'the fractional 4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/U3/91/09:53:03 AM

melt index EVA would form layers 44 and 48, and the central layer 46 would comprise 'the high vinyl acetate EVA.
Layers 42 and 50 of Figure 4 correspond to layers 14 and 10 respectively of Figure 1.
In Figure 5, a six layer film structure 5 is shown.
In this embodiment, a central layer 46 comprises a polyolefin, and preferably a fractional melt index EVA, high density polyethylene (HDPE), VLDPE, a blend of VLDPE and EVA, a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EVA, a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EMA, or a triple blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EMA and EVA.
Intermediate layers 44 and 48 comprise an ethylene vinyl ace-tate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1Ø
Outer layer 26 is a blend of high melt flow EPC and elastomer as described earlier fox Figs. 1 and 2.
Outer layer 20 is a copolyester as described above for Fig. 2.
Layer 22 comprises a polymeric adhesive as described above for Fig. 2.
In an alternative arrangement for the Film of Figure 5, the relative position of layers 46 and 44 is reversed (see Figure 5a). In the preferred embodiment, this puts identical or substantially identical lay-ers 48 and 44 next to each other in the multilayer film structure. Even when produced from two discrete melt streams, layers 48 and 44 can become in effect one thickened layer 60 (see Figure 5b). The inventor has found that bringing the EVA material of layer 44. closer to sealant layer 26 improves the radio frequency (RF) sealability of containers made from the inventive film.
4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

~?~~~"~~.~~
In Figure 6, a five layer film structure 6 is shown. This structure is essentially like -the structure shown in Figure 2, but with a layer 54 of a fractional melt index EVA (e. g. Elvax 3135 or Elvax 3165) added to the structure.
The films as described are preferably manufactured by a cast coextrusion process.
EXAMPLES
Exemplary multi-layer structures of Examples 1 through 3 were cast coextruded and irradiated, 'Phese structures are viewed as potential replacements for polyvinyl chloride bags. Examples 1 through 11, in part reflected in the detailed description of the preferred embodiments hereinbefore described, are discussed below with their respective formula-tions. The list for each example begins with the inside or sealant layer, and ending with the outside layer. Unless otherwise denoted, the Examples ' include the following materials:
EPCz: - NO 54 SEBS1: - Kraton G 1652 flexible copolyesterl:Ecdel 9965;

flexible copolyester~:Ecdel 9967 EVAN: - Elvax 3182-2 VLDPE~: -- DEFD 1362 Adhesivez = Bynel E 361 Adhesives = Plexar 3382 In Example 1, the multi-layer film comprised 80% EPC1 + 20%
SEBS1/EVA1/Adhesivez/Flexible Copolyesterl. The outer layer of flexible copolyester included about 5~ by weight of the outer layer of a masterbatch including IrganoxT" 1010, a high molecular weight stabilizer.
This masterbatch was included in like amount in 'the flexible copolyester layer of Examples 2 and 3.
4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

~~j.~r~.~~
In Example 2, the multi-layer film comprised the same construc-tion as the films of Example 1, but with a blend layer comprising 90%
EPC, + 10% SEBS1.
In Example 3 a multi-layer film comprised 80% EPC1 + 20%
SEBS1/50%VLDPEm+50%EPC_1/VLDPE1/Adhesive2/flexible copolyesterz.
Examples 4 through 6 are made by the same process described above for Examples 1 through 3, and comprise the same construction as Examples 1 through 3 respectively, except that the EPC of Examples 4 through 6 has a melt flow of about 5 grams/10 minutes (ASTM D 1238, Condi-tion L).
Examples 7 through 9 are made by the same process described above for Examples 1 through 3, and comprise the same construction as Examples 1 through 3 respectively, except that the EPC of Examples 7 through 9 has a melt flow of about 10 grams/10 minutes (ASTM D 1238, Condi-tion L).
Example 10 is made by the same process described above for Examples 1 through 3, and comprises 80% EPC1 + 20%
SEBS1/EVA1/50%EVA1+50%EPC1/EVA_l/Adhesivel/flexible copolyester.~.
Example 11 is made by the same process described above for Examples 1 through 3, and comprises 80% EPC1 -~ 20%
SEBSl/EVA..1/EVA1/50%EVAz'~50%EPC1/Adhesive,_/flexible copolyester, .
EPC resins with intermediate melt flow rates of e.g. 7, 8, 12, and 13 grams/10 minutes (ASTM D 1238, Condition L) can also be used in the present invention.
Films in accordance with the present invention are preferably cross-linked. This is preferably done by irradiation, i.e. bombarding the film with particulate and non-par'ticula'te radiations such as high energy 4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

~~~!'~'~
electrons from an accelerator or cobalt-60 gamma rays, to cross-link 'the materials of the film. Cross-linking increases the structural strength of film and/or the force at which the material can be stretched before tear-ing apart, and may also improve the optical properties of the film and change the high temperature properties of the film. A preferred irradia-tion dosage level is in the range of from about 2 Megarads (M. R.) to about 8 M.R.
Cross-Linking may also be accomplished chemically e.g.by the use of peroxides.
Pouches made in accordance with the present invention may be sealed by various means well known in the art, including radiation frequen-cy (R. F.) sealing, impulse and hot bar sealing.
The films according to the present invention are preferably formed by cast coextrusion as a tubular film. Containers for medical appli-cations, or other desired end uses can be made directly from the coextruded, tubular film, or alternatively from rollstock material ob-tained from 'the tube after it has been slit and ply separated. A hot blown process can also be used to make the film, although optical proper-ties of the resulting pouch would be inferior to those from a cast coextrusion process. Other processes, such as extrusion coating, conven-tional lamination, slot die extrusion, etc. can also be used to make 'the film of the present invention, although these alternative processes can be more difficult or less efficient than the preferred method.
It should be noted that 'the detailed description and specific examples which indicate the presently preferred embodiments of the inven-tion are given by way of illustration only. Various changes and modifica-tions within the spirit and scope of 'the claims will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon review of the above detailed de-scription and examples.
4/901005.1/OLDFLDR/07/03/91/09:53:03 AM

Claims (63)

1. An impact resistant film comprising:
(a) two outer layers each comprising a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer; and (b) an interior layer disposed between the two outer layers and comprising an ethylene Vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA), ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer (EMA), or blends thereof;
at least one of the outer layers also including an elastomer.
2, The impact resistant film of claim 1 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
3. The impact resistant film of claim 1 wherein at least one outer layer comprises a blend of 70% to 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer, and 5% to 30% of an elastomer.
4. The impact resistant film of claim 1 wherein the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer has a vinyl acetate content of between about 18% and 35%
by weight of the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
5. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer;
b) a second outer layer comprising a copolyester; and c) a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the first and second outer layers.
6. The impact resistant film of claim 5 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
7. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer;
b) a second outer layer comprising a copolyester;
c) an interior layer comprising an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend thereof; and d) a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the interior layer to the second outer layer.
8. The impact resistant film of claim 7 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
9. The impact resistant resistant film of claim 7 wherein the first outer layer comprises a blend of 70% to 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer, and 5% to 30% of an elastomer.
10. The impact resistant film of claim 7 wherein the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer of the central layer has a vinyl acetate content of between about 18% and 35% by weight of the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
11. The impact resistant film of claim 7 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified ethylene unsaturated ester copolymer.
12. The impact resistant film of claim 7 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified polymeric adhesive selected from the group consisting of:
a) modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer;
b) modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer;
c) modified linear low density polyethylene;
d) modified very low density polyethylene;

e) modified high density polyethylene;
f) modified polypropylene;
g) modified styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer; and h) ethylene propylene rubber.
13. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer;
b) a second outer layer comprising a copolyester;
c) a central layer comprising a polyolefin; and d) polymeric adhesive layers disposed between and adhering the respective outer layers to the central layer.
14. The impact resistant film of claim 13 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
15. The impact resistant film of claim 13 wherein the first outer layer comprises a blend of 70% to 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and 5% to 30% an elastomer.
16. The impact resistant film of claim 13 wherein the polyolefin is selected from the group consisting of:
a) ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer;
b) ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer;
c) a blend of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer and ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer; and d) very low density polyethylene.
17. The impact resistant film of claim 13 wherein the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer has a vinyl acetate content of between about 18%
and 35% by weight of the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
18. The impact resistant film of claim 13 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified ethylene unsaturated ester copolymer.
19. The impact resistant film of claim 18 wherein the chemically modified ethylene unsaturated ester copolymer is an adhesive selected from the group consisting of chemically modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer and chemically modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
20. The impact resistant film of claim 13 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified polymeric adhesive selected from the group consisting of:
a) modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer;
b) modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer;
c) modified linear low density polyethylene;
d) modified very low density polyethylene;

e) modified high density polyethylene;
f) modified polypropylene; and g) modified styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer.
21. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) two outer layers each comprising a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer;
b) a central layer comprising a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer;
c) an interior layer disposed between each of the two outer layers and the central layer respectively and comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1; and d) at least one of the outer layers also including an elastomer.
22. The impact resistant film of claim 21 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
23. The impact resistant film of claim 21 wherein at least one outer layer comprises a blend of 70% to 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer, and 5% to 30% of an elastomer.
24 24. The impact resistant film of claim 21 wherein the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer of the interior layers has a vinyl acetate content of between about 18% and 35% by weight of the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
25. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) two outer layers each comprising a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer;
b) a central layer comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1;
c) an interior layer disposed between each of the two outer layers and the central layer respectively and comprising a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer;
and d) at least one of the outer layers also including an elastomer.
26. The impact resistant film of claim 25 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
27. The impact resistant film of claim 25 wherein at least one outer layer comprises a blend of 70% to 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer, and 5% to 30% of an elastomer.
28. The impact resistant film of claim 25 wherein the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer of the central layer has a vinyl acetate content of between about 18% and 35% by weight of the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
29. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer;
b) a second outer layer comprising a copolyester;
c) a central layer comprising a polyolefin;
d) an interior layer disposed between the first outer layer and the central layer, and comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1;
and e) a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the copolyester layer to the central layer.
30. The impact resistant film of claim 29 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
31. The impact resistant film of claim 29 wherein the polyolefin is selected from the group consisting of:

a) a fractional melt index EVA;
b) high density polyethylene (HDPE);
c) very low density polyethylene (VLDPE);
d) a blend of VLDPE and EVA;
e) a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EVA;
f) a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EMA; and g) a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EVA and EMA.
32. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer;
b) a second outer layer comprising a copolyester;
c) a central layer comprising a polyolefin;
d) an interior layer disposed between each of the two outer layers and the central layer respectively and comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1; and e) a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the copolyester layer to an interior layer.
33. The impact resistant film of claim 32 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;

b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
34. The impact resistant film of claim 32 wherein the first outer layer comprises a blend of 70a to 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer, and 5% to 30% of an elastomer.
35. The impact resistant film of claim 32 wherein the central layer comprises a polyolefin selected from the group consisting of a) a fractional melt index EVA;
b) high density polyethylene (HDPE);
c) very low density polyethylene (VLDPE);
d) a blend of VLDPE and EVA;
e) a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EVA;
f) a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EMA; and g) a blend of polypropylene (or EPC) and EVA and EMA.
36. The impact resistant film of claim 32 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified ethylene unsaturated ester copolymer.
37. The impact resistant film of claim 36 wherein the chemically modified ethylene unsaturated aster copolymer is an adhesive selected from the group consisting of chemically modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer and chemically modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
38. The impact resistant film of claim 32 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified polymeric adhesive selected from the group consisting of:
a) modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer;
b) modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer;
c) modified linear low density polyethylene;
d) modified very low density polyethylene;
e) modified high density polyethylene;
f) modified polypropylene; and g) modified styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer.
39. An impact resistant film comprising:
a) a first outer layer comprising a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer;
b) a second outer layer comprising a copolyester;
c) a central layer comprising ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend thereof;
d) an interior layer disposed between the first outer layer and the central layer and comprising a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer; and e) a polymeric adhesive layer disposed between and adhering the copolyester layer to the central layer.
40. The impact resistant film of claim 39 wherein the elastomer is selected from the group consisting of:
a) styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer;
b) styrene butadiene styrene copolymer;
c) styrene isoprene styrene copolymer; and d) ethylene propylene rubber.
41. The impact resistant film of claim 39 wherein the first outer layer comprises a blend of 70% to 95% high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer, and 5% to 30% of an elastomer.
42. The impact resistant film of claim 39 wherein the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer of the interior layer has a vinyl acetate content of between about 18% and 35% by weight of the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer.
43. The impact resistant film of claim 39 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified ethylene unsaturated ester copolymer.
44. The impact resistant film of claim 39 wherein the polymeric adhesive comprises a chemically modified polymeric adhesive selected from the group consisting of:
a) modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer;
b) modified ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer;
c) modified linear low density polyethylene;
d) modified very low density polyethylene;

e) modified high density polyethylene;
f) modified polypropylene; and g) modified styrene ethylene butylene styrene copolymer.
45. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt steam of the blend of a), ii) a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer and ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, and iii) a third melt stream of high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer optionally blended with the elastomer, to form a film.
46. The method of claim 45 wherein between 70% and 95% of the high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer is blended with between 5% and 30%
of the elastomer.
47. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of the blend of (a), ii) a second melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and iii) a third melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
48. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of the blend of a), ii) a second melt stream of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend thereof, iii) a third melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and iv) a fourth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
49. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of the blend of a), ii) a second melt stream of a polyolefin, iii) a third melt stream of a copolyester, and iv) a melt stream of a polymeric adhesive disposed between each of the first and second melt streams, and the second and third melt streams respectively, to form a film.
50. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of the blend of a), ii) a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, iii) a central melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, iv) a fourth melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, and v) a fifth melt stream of high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer optionally blended with the elastomer, to form a film.
51. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:

a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of the blend of a), ii) a second melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, iii) a central melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, iv) a fourth melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, and v) a fifth melt stream of high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer optionally blended with the elastomer, to form a film.
52. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of a blend of a);
ii) a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1.0;
iii) a third melt stream of a polyolefin;
iv) a fourth melt stream of a polymeric adhesive; and v) a fifth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
53. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of the blend of a), ii) a second melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, iii) a third melt stream of a polyolefin, iv) a fourth melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer having a melt index greater than about 1, v) a fifth melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and vi) a sixth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
54. A method of making an impact resistant film comprising:
a) providing a blend of a high melt flow ethylene propylene copolymer and an elastomer; and b) extruding i) a first melt stream of the blend of a), ii) a second melt stream of a fractional melt index ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, iii) a third melt stream of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, ethylene methyl acrylate copolymer, or a blend thereof, iv) a fourth melt stream of a polymeric adhesive, and v) a fifth melt stream of a copolyester, to form a film.
55. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 1.
56. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 5.
57. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 7.
58. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 13.
59. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 21.
60. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 25.
61. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 29.
62. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 32.
63. A medical pouch made from the film of claim 39.
CA 2047148 1990-07-25 1991-07-16 High melt flow polypropylene medical film Expired - Lifetime CA2047148C (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US659,216 1976-02-19
US558,042 1983-12-05
US55804290 true 1990-07-25 1990-07-25
US65921691 true 1991-02-22 1991-02-22

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA2047148A1 true CA2047148A1 (en) 1992-01-26
CA2047148C true CA2047148C (en) 2000-07-04

Family

ID=27071611

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 2047148 Expired - Lifetime CA2047148C (en) 1990-07-25 1991-07-16 High melt flow polypropylene medical film

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US5789046A (en)
JP (1) JP3064046B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2047148C (en)
DE (2) DE69122328T2 (en)
EP (1) EP0468768B1 (en)

Families Citing this family (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2130893A1 (en) * 1993-09-17 1995-03-18 Bayer Corporation Method and system for collecting, processing and storing blood components
US5683768A (en) * 1994-12-21 1997-11-04 Baxter International Inc. Plastic formulations for platelet storage containers and the like
US5695840A (en) * 1995-03-22 1997-12-09 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Films for medical solution pouches
US6500505B2 (en) 1998-05-15 2002-12-31 Cryovac, Inc. Thermoplastic film with good interply adhesion
WO2000013887A1 (en) * 1998-09-04 2000-03-16 Avery Dennison Corporation Composite multilayer constructions
US6210524B1 (en) * 1999-09-03 2001-04-03 Avery Dennison Corporation Method of improving peel-plate dispensability of label constructions
US6495266B1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2002-12-17 Exxonmobil Oil Corporation Films with improved blocking resistance and surface properties
KR100722902B1 (en) * 2000-03-16 2007-05-30 백스터 인터내셔널 인코포레이티드 Multiple Layer Film of a New Non-PVC Material
US6969483B1 (en) 2000-03-16 2005-11-29 Baxter International Inc. Autoclavable, non-adherent, heat sealable polymer blends for fabricating monolayer and multiple layered films
US7635388B1 (en) * 2000-05-04 2009-12-22 Tyler Thomas D Device and method for incremental correction of sight disorders and occular diseases
US6440533B1 (en) 2000-09-22 2002-08-27 Tredegar Film Products Corporation PVC replacement film
CA2418509A1 (en) 2000-10-11 2002-04-18 Aristech Chemical Corporation Polypropylene materials with high melt flow rate and good molding characteristics and methods of making
CA2436175A1 (en) * 2001-02-20 2002-08-29 Pall Corporation Container for biological fluid
DE10144892B4 (en) * 2001-09-12 2005-09-08 Disetronic Licensing Ag Multilayer plastic body
US6913147B2 (en) 2002-05-16 2005-07-05 Sealed Air Corporation (Us) Packaging structure having a frame and film
US20040219198A1 (en) * 2003-05-01 2004-11-04 3M Innovative Properties Company Transdermal drug delivery device with multilayer backing
WO2004112477A1 (en) * 2003-06-20 2004-12-29 Pall Corporation Processing of platelet-containing biological fluids
US20050266190A1 (en) * 2004-05-25 2005-12-01 Zhang David D Copolyetherester composition and multilayer structure thereof
JP4633060B2 (en) 2004-10-05 2011-02-23 シャープ株式会社 Electrode substrate and a display apparatus including the same
US7651653B2 (en) 2004-12-22 2010-01-26 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Machine and cross-machine direction elastic materials and methods of making same
US20070049880A1 (en) * 2005-08-23 2007-03-01 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Filter assembly for an ostomy device
WO2007033083A3 (en) 2005-09-12 2007-09-27 Abela Pharmaceuticals Inc Systems for removing dimethyl sulfoxide (dmso) or related compounds, or odors associated with same
US9427419B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2016-08-30 Abela Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Compositions comprising dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)
US8480797B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2013-07-09 Abela Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Activated carbon systems for facilitating use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by removal of same, related compounds, or associated odors
WO2007033180A1 (en) 2005-09-12 2007-03-22 Abela Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Materials for facilitating administration of dimethyl sulfoxide (dmso) and related compounds
WO2008046164A3 (en) * 2006-10-18 2009-05-07 Johan Willy Declerck Method for manufacturing a multi-layered film and film manufactured by said method
CA2742397C (en) 2008-11-03 2017-09-12 Abela Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Activated carbon systems for facilitating use or treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (dmso)
WO2010059243A3 (en) * 2008-11-21 2010-08-26 Berry Plastics Corporation Multi-layer stretch film
CA2779111A1 (en) 2009-10-30 2011-05-05 Abela Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Dimethyl sulfoxide (dmso) and methylsulfonylmethane (msm) formulations to treat osteoarthritis
US9346601B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2016-05-24 Monosol Rx, Llc Reduction in stress cracking of films
WO2015160592A1 (en) 2014-04-17 2015-10-22 Ticona Llc Elastomeric composition having oil resistance

Family Cites Families (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4196240A (en) * 1978-01-18 1980-04-01 Union Carbide Corporation Heat shrinkable multilayer packaging film of blended copolymers and elastomers
US4194039A (en) * 1978-04-17 1980-03-18 W. R. Grace & Co. Multi-layer polyolefin shrink film
US4188443A (en) * 1978-08-30 1980-02-12 W. R. Grace & Co. Multi-layer polyester/polyolefin shrink film
US4401536A (en) * 1979-08-10 1983-08-30 Delmed, Inc. Biocompatible, steam-sterilizable irradiated articles comprised of ethylene copolymer and polypropylene blends
GB2149345B (en) * 1983-11-09 1987-03-11 Grace W R & Co Heat sterilizable laminate films
US4643926A (en) * 1985-04-29 1987-02-17 W. R. Grace & Co., Cryovac Div. Flexible medical solution pouches
CA1265035A (en) * 1985-11-29 1990-01-30 Jean Elizabeth Raniere Multiple layer packaging films and packages formed thereof
US4927691A (en) * 1987-10-16 1990-05-22 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Implosion resistant films
US4938683A (en) * 1987-11-13 1990-07-03 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Monoaxially oriented shrink film
US4977022A (en) * 1988-03-15 1990-12-11 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Barrier stretch film
US4952451A (en) * 1988-11-17 1990-08-28 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. Stretch/shrink film with improved oxygen transmission
US5075143A (en) * 1989-09-29 1991-12-24 W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn. High barrier implosion resistant films
CA2041023C (en) * 1990-04-26 2002-03-12 William K. Goss Photocurable elements and flexographic printing plates prepared therefrom

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CA2047148A1 (en) 1992-01-26 application
EP0468768A1 (en) 1992-01-29 application
EP0468768B1 (en) 1996-09-25 grant
DE69122328T2 (en) 1997-02-06 grant
JP3064046B2 (en) 2000-07-12 grant
JPH04226751A (en) 1992-08-17 application
US5789046A (en) 1998-08-04 grant
DE69122328D1 (en) 1996-10-31 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4650721A (en) Polypropylene barrier film and method of forming same
US4977022A (en) Barrier stretch film
US5407713A (en) Multilayered barrier structures
US5730919A (en) Method of forming multilayered barrier structures
US4647483A (en) Nylon copolymer and nylon blends and films made therefrom
US5053457A (en) Coextrudable adhesives and products therefrom
US4680207A (en) Thermoplastic sack
US5591792A (en) Adhesive resin composition
US4511609A (en) Multilayer trash bag film
US5482771A (en) Moisutre barrier film
US5616420A (en) Laminate film
US5346763A (en) Multilayer film structure
US4994324A (en) Hot-fill polyethylene bags
US5543223A (en) Moisture barrier film
US6306503B1 (en) Multilayer fluoropolymer films with improved adhesion
US5928744A (en) PVC-free multilayer tube for medical purposes, process for the production thereof and use
US4574104A (en) Multi-layer film
EP0561428A1 (en) Oxygen barrier packaging film
US6074715A (en) Heat shrinkable barrier bags
US4683170A (en) Nylon copolymer and nylon blends and films made therefrom
US4939009A (en) Multilayered sheets having excellent adhesion
US5567488A (en) Multilayer barrier film for transdermal drug delivery system and ostomy applications
US5681627A (en) Highly flexible multilayer films for various medical applications
US4210686A (en) Multi-layered plastic sheeting having high clarity, strength, and resistance to water vapor transmission
US4755419A (en) Oxygen barrier oriented shrink film

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
EEER Examination request
MKEX Expiry