CA1287073C - Repair of a member having a projection - Google Patents

Repair of a member having a projection

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Publication number
CA1287073C
CA1287073C CA000511054A CA511054A CA1287073C CA 1287073 C CA1287073 C CA 1287073C CA 000511054 A CA000511054 A CA 000511054A CA 511054 A CA511054 A CA 511054A CA 1287073 C CA1287073 C CA 1287073C
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
metal
projection
support
tooth
repair
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Fee Related
Application number
CA000511054A
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Bertrand G. Robins
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
General Electric Co
Original Assignee
General Electric Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US744,365 priority Critical
Priority to US06/744,365 priority patent/US4657171A/en
Application filed by General Electric Co filed Critical General Electric Co
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of CA1287073C publication Critical patent/CA1287073C/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical Current

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23PMETAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; COMBINED OPERATIONS; UNIVERSAL MACHINE TOOLS
    • B23P6/00Restoring or reconditioning objects
    • B23P6/002Repairing turbine components, e.g. moving or stationary blades, rotors
    • B23P6/007Repairing turbine components, e.g. moving or stationary blades, rotors using only additive methods, e.g. build-up welding
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K35/00Rods, electrodes, materials, or media, for use in soldering, welding, or cutting
    • B23K35/22Rods, electrodes, materials, or media, for use in soldering, welding, or cutting characterised by the composition or nature of the material
    • B23K35/24Selection of soldering or welding materials proper
    • B23K35/30Selection of soldering or welding materials proper with the principal constituent melting at less than 1550 degrees C
    • B23K35/3033Ni as the principal constituent
    • B23K35/304Ni as the principal constituent with Cr as the next major constituent
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B23MACHINE TOOLS; METAL-WORKING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K9/00Arc welding or cutting
    • B23K9/04Welding for other purposes than joining, e.g. built-up welding
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C22METALLURGY; FERROUS OR NON-FERROUS ALLOYS; TREATMENT OF ALLOYS OR NON-FERROUS METALS
    • C22FCHANGING THE PHYSICAL STRUCTURE OF NON-FERROUS METALS AND NON-FERROUS ALLOYS
    • C22F1/00Changing the physical structure of non-ferrous metals or alloys by heat treatment or by hot or cold working
    • C22F1/10Changing the physical structure of non-ferrous metals or alloys by heat treatment or by hot or cold working of nickel or cobalt or alloys based thereon
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01BPERMANENT WAY; PERMANENT-WAY TOOLS; MACHINES FOR MAKING RAILWAYS OF ALL KINDS
    • E01B5/00Rails; Guard rails; Distance-keeping means for them
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16JPISTONS; CYLINDERS; SEALINGS
    • F16J15/00Sealings
    • F16J15/44Free-space packings
    • F16J15/447Labyrinth packings
    • F16J15/453Labyrinth packings characterised by the use of particular materials
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49718Repairing
    • Y10T29/49721Repairing with disassembling
    • Y10T29/49723Repairing with disassembling including reconditioning of part
    • Y10T29/49725Repairing with disassembling including reconditioning of part by shaping
    • Y10T29/49726Removing material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49718Repairing
    • Y10T29/49732Repairing by attaching repair preform, e.g., remaking, restoring, or patching

Abstract

REPAIR OF A MEMBER HAVING A PROJECTION
ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE
Repair or replacement of a projection such as a labyrinth seal tooth of a metal having relatively poor weldability characteristics is accomplished by removing a portion or possibly all of the seal tooth down to a pedestal and then metallurgically bonding as by fusing to the pedestal a second metal characterized as having good weldability characteristics when diluted with the first metal, and age hardenable with an aging heat treatment with which the first metal also is age hardenable.

Description

REPAIR OF A MEMBER HAVING A PROJECTION
_ _ This invention relates to the repair of a metal member which includes a projection and, more particularly, to the repair of such a member as a seal made of a material having relatively poor weldability and repair weldability characteristics.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
A variety of s-tationary and rotating seals, generally referred to as of the labyrinth type, are used in various parts oE a gas turbine engine. During manufacture, opera-tion, maintenance, etc., such seals, which include one or more projections or teeth connec-ted with a support structure, can be worn or damaged.
It has become common practice to repair in a relatively cost effective manner certain types of such seal teeth or projections by first removing the damaged portion of the tooth. The same material of the -tooth then is reapplied as by welding with a filler wire, with excess added material being removed, such as by machining, to regenerate the -tooth. Methods and apparatus for conducting such repair is described in U.S. Pa-tent No. 4,159,~10, issued June 26, 1979 to Cooper, and U.S. Patent No. ~,~41,012, issued April 3, 1984 to Risbeck and Cooper. As is described in these patents, a filler materia] in wire form is moved in a reciprocating manner into and out of a weld pool created by a heating source such as an electric arc.
In some cases, because of poor weldability, ~ ~37~7~
- 2 - 13~V 8784 including poor weld flow charac-teris-tics and crack sensitivity o:E -the me-tal :Erom which the projection or tooth is made, the seal teeth cannot be repaired ln a practical manner. Accordingly, when damaged, the costly member may be reshaped for use in another engine posi-tion or replaced, rather than repaired.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
It is a principal object of the present invention to provide an improved method for repairing a member having a projection, at least the projection having been made of a metal having relatively poor weldability and repair weldability characteristics.
I-t is another object of the present invention to provide a method for repairing such a member in the form of a seal having at least one tooth.
A further object of the present invention is to provide a seal member which includes a composite projection or seal tooth.
These and other objects and advantages will be more fully understood from the following detailed description, the examples and thedrawings, which are all intended to be typical of rather than in any way limiting on the scope of the present invention.
Briefly, one Eorm of the method of the present invention involves repairing a metal article comprising a support and a projection of an operating height and shape projecting from a surface of the support. The projec-tion, and generally the support, is made of a first metal characterized as having rela-tively poor weldability and repair weldability characteristics. Generally the method includes removing at least a portion of the projection and replacing the removed portion wi-th additional ma-terial.
In the improved method, at least a portion of the operating height of the projection is removed, usually providing a projection pedestalO There is provided, 7~
preferably in wire form for use in a welding type operation, an additional ma-terial of a second metal characterized as having good weldability and repalr weldabili-ty charac-teristics when diluted with the Eirst metal and age-hardenable with an aging heat treatment with which the first metal is also age hardenableO The second me-tal is metallurgically bonded as addi-tional material, for example as by melting and fusing molten material with the support or the projection pedestal, or both. When bonded, as by being solidified and cooled, the additional material is in the condition substantially of a solid solution. This provides a repair suppor-t/
projection preform. The preform is then subjected to the aying heat treatment after which a portion of the additional material is removed to regenerate the projection in its operating height and shape.
Another form of the invention provides a rotary labyrinth seal having a support and at least one integral seal tooth as a projection. The projection is a composite of the above-described first metal, preferably, as a tooth pedestal, metallurgically bonded with the above-described second metal.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF T~E DRAWING
FIGURE 1. iS a diagrammatic sequence of steps utilizing a curren-tly practiced method for repairing labyrinth seal -teeth on a seal of a metal alloy commercially available as IN 718 Alloy and characterized as having relatively good weldability charac-teris-tics.
FIGURE 2 is a diagrammatic sequence of steps at-tempting to u-tilize a currently practiced method for repairing labyrin-th seal teeth on a seal of a metal alloy commercially available as A286 Alloy and characterized as having relatively poor weldabili-ty characteris-tics.
~'IGURE 3 is a diagrammatic sequence of steps utilizing the presen-t invention for repairing labyrinth seal teeth of -the difficult to weld A286 Alloy.
- 4 - 13DV 878~

FIGURE 4 iS a graphica1 presentation o:E a microhardness traverse across a seal tooth repairecl according to the me-thod of the present inven-tion and in the as-welded and in the post-weld heat treatecl conditions.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
The modern gas turbine engine, for example the type used in aircraft, includes a variety of seals some of which are labyrinth-type rotary seals. Examples of such seals are shown in the description of U.S. Patent No. 4,397,471, issued August 9, 1983 to Feldman et al, and assigned to the assignee of the present invention.
In such seals, at least one tooth or projection, and generally a plurality of teeth or projections, cooperates-with an opposed surEace which can be con-tinuous or can be a porous or open-celled structure such as honeycomb.
In some cases, the tooth projections rotate with rotating engine components; in other cases, the opposed surface, such as a shaft, rotates in respect to stationary toothed members. Because various components of a gas turbine engine associated with the coopera-ting seal members tend to expand at differen-t rates during operation, an interference can occur with, and damage can result in, the tooth or projection. In other instances, the too-th or projection can be eroded by airborne particles impinging on -the tooth. In still other instances, teeth can be damaged during manufacture, assembly, or maintenance of the seal or engine. In any event, frequently it is necessary -to repair such teeth or projections.
One method for making such repair is described in -the the above-mentioned U.S. Paten-t 4,159,410. In that method, the damaged portion of -the tooth is removed and a filler wire is fed into a weld pool created on the -tooth by a heating source such as a welding torch. In this way, generally -through multiple passes over the tooth, additional material is metallurgically bonded to - 5 - 13DV ~78~

the tooth to an appropriate height. Then the material is removed such as by machining to regenerate -the -tooth.
Attempts have been made to apply -this type of method to gas turbine engine seal teeth made of a metal known to have poor weldability and repair weldabili-ty characteristics, for example an iron-base alloy, one form of which is commercially available as A286 Alloy, and having a nominal composition, by weight, of about 15% Cr, 25% Ni, 1.3% Mo, 2.2% Ti~ 0.006% B, 0.3% V with the balance Fe. As is well known in the art, such alloy is a challenging material to weld, due in part to its poor flowing characteristics in the molten s-tate and the propensity for cracking, particularly in the heat-affected zone. These characteristics, called poor weldability charac-teristics, severely reduce the weldability of this material by the rnethod described in the above-mentioned U.S. Patent ~,159,~10. For example, initial melt-down passes, generally made as an early step in -the process, are inconsistent and of very poor quality. This condition presents great difficulty for deposition of subsequent weld layers, and is considered -to have poor repair weldahility characteristics.
The above described sequence of steps using the known method is shown in the diagrammatic, fragmentary, perspective sequential views of Figure 1. Figure lA is a transverse cross-sectional view of the as-received seal tooth 10, representative of a projection, showing the worn or damaged tip portion at 12. The operating height of the tooth, i.e. the height to which the tooth originally was manufac-tured, is shown at H, with the original configuration of the tooth shown in phantom.
Figure lB is a transverse cross-sectional view of such seal tooth 10 after removal of tip portion 12. The removed portion is shown in phantom. Sometimes such a step is referred to as pre-weld machining.
If the seal tooth 10 is made of a material ~370~3 ~ 6 - 13DV 3784 characterized as having relatively good weldability and repair weldabili-ty, one example o:E which is commerci.ally available IN718 Alloy which has a nomi.nal composition, by we.ight, o:E about 0.05% C, 19% Cr, 18% Fe, 3% Mo, 5% Cb and Ta, 1% Ti, 0.5% Al, with the balance Ni, the remainder of the sequence of steps in Figure 1 can be conducted without significant difficulty. IN718 Alloy is well known in the art to have good weldability and repair weldability characteristics.
Figure lC is a transverse cross-section of tooth 10 after a melt-down (autogenous) pass. In this step, heat is applied to the machined surface portion of the tooth, shown in phantom, with no fill.er material added, and generally at constant magnitude of current, to melt the tooth outer portion and prèpare that portion for subsequent operations. Figure lD is a transverse cross-section showing additional IN718 Alloy filler wire material 14a added using the above-described Cooper method. Similarly, Figure lE shows subse~uently added material 14b, 14c, and 14d to a specified height, greater than height ~1, from which a regenerated tooth can be machined. Figure lF shows the final machined tooth with a portion of the added filler material, shown in phantom, machined away. I-t should be noted -that ei-ther a positive step portion 16 or a negative s-tep portion 18 (both of which are shown for convenience and of exaggerated size in the presentation in Figure lF) generally remains as a result of inherent mismatch in set-up for machining.
Such a step portion generally is located at metallurgical bond or weld junction zone at -the intersection of -the machined weld metal -to -the existing -tooth portion, and is of a size allowable with the use of IN718 Alloy.
Application of such a repair method to an alloy such as A286 Alloy which has poor weldability, including crack sensitivity characteristics has not been found to be successful. For example, the poor weldability and 7~

- 7 - 13DV 878~

susceptibility -to cracklng does not permlt an adequa-te melt-down step of the type descrlbed in connection wi-th Figure lC.
Fl~ure 2 ls a diagrammatlc, fragmentary, perspectlve sequence of views showlng an attempt to use the known method, descrlbed ln the sequence of vlews of Figure 1, with an A286 Alloy seal tooth. In this example, the seal of Figure 2A was prepared in the form shown in Figure 2B, as described above ln connectlon wlth Flgures lA and lB. However, when an attempt was made at the autogenous melt-down pass to prepare the outer tooth portion for subsequent operatlons, an unacceptable condltlon resulted. As shown ln Figure 2C, the melted portlon was irregular in -thickness and shape, as shown generally at 20, with unacceptable bulges and thinned portions as a result of the poor weldability charac-teristics of the A286 Alloy. Further repair operations, such as the type described in connection with Figure 1, are extremely difficult and unacceptable in a production situation.
The method of the present inventlon eliminates the autogenous mel-t-down procedure and avoids generation of step portions 16 or 18 in Flgure lF, provldlng a replacement tooth of a materlal more easlly repaired in subsequent repair procedures. The present invention, ln one form, ls summarlzed in the dlagrammatic, fragmentary, perspective sequential views of Flgure 3, whlch are all transverse cross-sectlons. Flgure 3A, llke Figure lA, shows -the seal tooth 10 in -the as-recelved condltlon wlth worn or damaged portion at -thetip shown at 12. Flgure 3B
shows the removal of at least a portlon of the operatlng height H of the tooth or projection 10. Accordlng to the present lnventlon there ls provlded, ln thls way, a base location for subsequent operatlons. Generally, a projec-tlon pedestal 22 ln Figure 3B remains, although it should be understood -that all of tooth 10 can be removed (for example, flush with surface 2~) and replaced wi-th 7~

additional material metallurgically bonded -to such base location. Generally, the projection pedestal extends in a range up to about 0 1" away from first surface 24 of support 26. In comparison with the se~uence of Figure 1, such removal generally is very much greater than in the known method, to result in a base location or projection pedestal of up to about 0.1" away from surface 24. For example, in one production part made of A286 Alloy, the operating height of tooth or projection 10 in Figure 3A
above surface 24 of support 26 was about 0.13". Tooth 10 had a cross-sectional thickness of 0.01" joined to surface 24 at a radius of about 0.05". In the known repair, dimension X in Figure lB was 0.12" whereas dimension Y in Figure 3B was no greater than about 0.10". In one form of the present invention for use with rela-tively large seal teeth, removal of such major portion of the tooth of the relative dimensions described avoids the requiremen-t for a melt-down operating in a difficult to weld material like A286 Alloy.
According to the present invention, after pre-weld machining, the melt-down opera-tion is elimina-ted and a filler, additional, material is added to projection pedes-tal 22 as shown at 28a in Figure 3C. Through an appropriate number oE add:itional sequential steps represented by Figure 3D, sufficien-t additional material is metallurgically bonded to a height sufficient to enable regenera-tion, for example -through machining, of a replacement tooth to its operating heigh-t H. In Figure 3D, -the multiple passes of added filler material are represented by the portions 28a, 28b, 28c, and 28d.
In this way, the repair support/projection preform shown in Figure 3D is provided. The additional material added as 28a, 28b, 28c, and 28d is of metal characterized as having good weldability and repair weldabili-ty characteristics when diluted wi-th the metal o-E the member being repaired, in this example A286 Alloy.

37~73 Further, the addltional. ma-terial is cha:racterizetl as being age-hardenable wi-th a post-weld aging heat treatment with which the me-tal of construction, for example A286 Alloy, also is age~hardenable. In this particular example, such additional material which is compatible and useful in the me-thod o:E the present invention in the repair of A286 Alloy seal teeth is the above identified, commercially available IN718 Alloy. Such alloy, when metallurgically bonded as by welding to the A286 All.oy, is in a condition which is substantially a solid solution at the bond juncture zone.
It should be recognized that when the additional material is applied by welding to the material of construction of the seal member, a portion of the material of construction will melt and dilute the additional material being applied.
After provision of the repair preform, for example, of the type shown in Figure 3D, a portion of the additional material is removed, as shown in Figure 3F, from about projection pedestal 22 and, optionally, from the surface 24 of support 26 to regenerate the composite projection without a step portion of the types shown at 16 or 18 in Figure lF. The metallurgical bond or weld junction zone 30 in Figure 3E away from the fillet between projection pedestal 22 and support 26 at which higher stresses generally are experienced during operation.
To avoid genera-tion of step por-tions 16 or 18 of Figure lF, a portion o:E surface 24 of support 26 can be machined away along with excess additional material, shown in phantom in Figure 3E, to regenerate the tooth and to provide a new support surface 24a in Figure 3E. The regenerated composite projection shown generally at 32 in Figure 3F, has an outer portion 34 away from support 26 and is of a metal characterized as having good weldability and repair weldabili-ty characteristics.
The projection can be repaired subsequently, if the need should arise, according to a.method used prior to the present invention, for example as described in connection 7~73 with the sequence of views in Figure 1.
In a typical example oE practice oE -the present invention, a gas turbine engine seal macle of A236 Alloy and having damaged labyrinth seal -teeth was prepared for repair by cleaning in a sodium hydroxide aqueous solution after which it was rinsed in water and dried with air. Thereafter, it was inspected using -the fluorescent penetran-t inspection technique commonly used in the art to determine if any cracks existed in the ar-ticle. Principal dimensions of the article were as Eollows: 11.9" diameter seal teeth having a nominal thickness of 0.01" and an 11.7" diameter pedestal with 0.045" typical radius between the seal teeth and the pedestal. Seals found to be unserviceable yet repairable were then mounted in a lathe and machined to remove a portion of the seal tooth or projection as shown in Figure 3B. After pre-weld machining, there remained a pedestal such as 22 in Figure 3B having a height Y of no greater than about 0.1". After machining, the pedestal and adjacent surfaces were cleaned and the seal held on a rotating work table for application of additional material in accordance with the above-described Cooper method.
Specific weldiny parameters used in the present invention are unique to each article configuration.
They are selected, by a manner well-known in the welding art, to minimize heat input and depth of penetra-tion, to accommodate the poor we]dability characteristics of A236 Alloy, and to induce a rninimal amount of distortion into the seal. As has been stated, in general, A236 Alloy exhibits poor weldability and repair weldability. The base metal at the toe of the weld (-the intersection of -the surfaces of the base metal and weld metal) is very susceptible to cracking, a condition around which the welding parameters were developed. Since most cracks generally are open to the surface of the base metal, ~a~3 - 11 - 13DV 878~

such cracks are easily cletec-table using Eluorescent penetran-t inspection. Accordlng to the present invention, welds have been produced which are entirely free from this charac-teris-tic cracking problem oE A286 Alloy.
In this example, the additional material or filler material used and which has good weldability and repair weldability characteristics as well as being age-hardenable with a post-weld aging heat treatment with which the A286 Alloy is age-hardenable was -the above-described, commercially available IN718 Alloy, also identified as AMS5832 Alloy. As has been stated, it was selected because when diluted with A286 Alloy, the IN718 Alloy exhibits good weldability characteristics, thus facilitating -the welding process. Also, both A286 and IN718 Alloys respond favorably to the same aging post-weld heat treatmen-t. This allows for -the restoration of mechanical properties after welding without subjecting the seal to a full solution heat treatment. In additionj IN718 Alloy as a replacement seal tooth is very weldable and can later be re-repaired by welding by more conventional welding techniques such as taht described in the aforementioned Cooper U.S.
Patent 4,159,410.
In this example, the additional IN718 Alloy material was applied in the range of 3-10 pass increments of approximately 0.03" thick each to generate on the seal support a repair support/projection preform represented by Figure 3D. The preform was then heat treated by a vacuum heat treatment cycle which had been developed for A286 gas turbine engine blades which had been repaired with IN718 welded tips. The treatment consisted of evacuating the chamber to abou-t 0.5 microns Hg or less, after which the part was heated to about 1400F for about two hours. Thereafter, the part was cooled -to about 1150F at a cooling rate of about 100F
per hour and then held at 1150F for about four hours 37~3 - 12 - L3DV 878~

after which it was cooled by back Eil]ing the chamber with an iner-t gas.
Use of this type of ag:ing hea-t -treatmen-t rather than a solution and aging hea-t trea-tment is facilitated by -the use of the type of method described in the above-mentioned Cooper U.S. Patent 4,159,410.
Through the use of such method, the deposited weld metal, metallurgically bonded to the subs-trate material, is essentially in the solution condition upon solidification and cooling. The degree of auto-aging which occurs as weld increments (passes) are stacked one upon the other, as shown in Figure 3D, is negligible due to the short times that the metal is at -the aging temperatures. The heat-affected zone consists of that portion of the base metal which was metallurgically altered due to the welding heat.
The dominant region of the heat-affected zone is that portion which was put into the solution condition. This solution region responds to the short age heat treatment described above similarly by both the IN718 Alloy and the A286 Alloy base metal. Figure 4 is a graphical presentation of a microhardness traverse in both the as-welded and after post-weld heat treatment conditions. In Figure 4 in connection with hardness data, ''Rc'' means "Rockwell C", and "VHN" means "Vickers Hardness Number".
After hea-t treatment, the preform was machined -to regenerate the seal teeth or projec-tions to -their operating hei~ht and shape. In this example, a portion of -the addi-tional material shown in Figure 3D
was removed, as shown in phantom in Figure 3E. In addition, a small amount of surface 2~ of support 26 was removed to eliminate all deposited additional material at the fillet of the seal tooth and to move the fusion line 30 in Figure 3E away from the base oE the radius between the seal -tooth and suppor-t 26.
After machining, the article was inspected for distor-tion. It was found that the practice of the - 13 - 13D~ 878~

method of -the present invention produced a mi:n:imal distortion which was within -the serviceable limits o:E the par-t.
Al-though the present invention has been described in connection with speciEic examples, alloys, and embod:iments, such as seals, it will be recognized by those skilled in the art the variations and modifications of which the present invention is capable without depart-ing from its scope represented by the appended claims.

Claims (7)

  1. The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:
    l. In a method of repairing a metal article comprising a support and a projection of an operating height and shape projecting from a first surface of the support, the projection being of a first metal characterized as having relatively poor weldability and repair weldability characteristics, including poor weld flow and crack sensitivity, the method including removing at least a portion of the projection and replacing the removed portion with additional material, the steps of:
    mechanically removing at least a portion of the operating height of the projection to provide a projection pedestal having a base location extending in a range up to about 0.1" away from the first surface;
    providing an additional material of a second metal characterized as having good weldability and repair weldability characteristics when diluted with the first metal and age hardenable with an aging heat treatment with which the first metal also is age hardenable;
    metallurgically bonding the additional material directly to the base location, without prior melting of the base location, at a bond juncture zone to replace at least the removed portion, the additional material after bonding being in a condition which is substantially a solid solution, to provide a repair support/projection preform;
    subjecting the preform to the aging heat treatment; and then removing a portion of the additional material to regenerate the projection in the operating height and shape.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 in which the projection is a seal tooth.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2 in which the first metal is A286 Alloy, and the second metal is IN718 Alloy.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1 in which a portion of the first surface is removed adjacent to the projection pedestal, along with additional material, to position the bond juncture zone more remote from the support.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1 of repairing a metal article in which the projection is integral with and projecting from the support at a fillet with the first surface, the projection, and the support being of the first metal wherein:
    a major portion of the projection is removed to provide the projection pedestal;
    the additional material is provided in wire form; and the additional material is deposited by melting the wire and fusing the molten wire material with the base location and projection pedestal to provide the repair support/projection preform.
  6. 6. A labyrinth gas seal comprising a support and at least one seal tooth projecting from a surface of the support wherein:
    the tooth is a composite of a first metal in the form of a tooth pedestal integral with and projecting in a range of up to about 0.1" from a surface of the support and a second metal metallurgically bonded at a bond juncture zone directly to the tooth pedestal which exhibits no prior melting of the tooth pedestal at the bond juncture zone;
    the first metal is characterized as having relatively poor weldability and repair weldability characteristics and the second metal is characterized as having good weldability and repair weldability characteristics when diluted with the first metal and age hardenable with an aging heat treatment with which the first metal also is age hardenable.
  7. 7. The seal of claim 6 in which the first metal is A286 Alloy, and the second metal is IN718 Alloy.
CA000511054A 1985-06-13 1986-06-06 Repair of a member having a projection Expired - Fee Related CA1287073C (en)

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US06/744,365 US4657171A (en) 1985-06-13 1985-06-13 Repair of a member having a projection

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JP (1) JPS6233067A (en)
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CA (1) CA1287073C (en)
DE (1) DE3619536A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2583326B1 (en)
GB (1) GB2177038B (en)
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FR2583326B1 (en) 1992-03-20
FR2583326A1 (en) 1986-12-19
BE904920A (en) 1986-12-15
IT1190006B (en) 1988-02-10
GB8612456D0 (en) 1986-07-02
GB2177038B (en) 1989-04-05
IT8620721D0 (en) 1986-06-09
US4657171A (en) 1987-04-14
DE3619536A1 (en) 1986-12-18
GB2177038A (en) 1987-01-14
JPS6233067A (en) 1987-02-13
BE904920A1 (en)
NL8601474A (en) 1987-01-02

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