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Throat structure for golf club bags

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Publication number
CA1235675A
CA1235675A CA 465723 CA465723A CA1235675A CA 1235675 A CA1235675 A CA 1235675A CA 465723 CA465723 CA 465723 CA 465723 A CA465723 A CA 465723A CA 1235675 A CA1235675 A CA 1235675A
Authority
CA
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
golf
cross
body
ring
means
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA 465723
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
John A. Solheim
Original Assignee
John A. Solheim
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B55/00Bags for golf clubs; Stands for golf clubs for use on the course; Wheeled carriers specially adapted for golf bags

Abstract

Abstract of the Disclosure A throat structure for use in the open top of a golf bag includes the combination of a ring-shaped body with a special divider therein which separates the opening into the golf bag into four golf club segregation areas. The special divider is provided with a pair of cross bars that are interconnected at their centers by a transverse rib with the cross bars being angular so that the golf clubs containable in the segregation areas will tend to collect in predetermined locations in the segregation areas when the golf bag is being carried to facilitate golf club selection and removal and to minimize golf club entangle-ment.

Description

lZ;~S675 Rovr:D 'I'IIROAT sTRI~cTul~r~ ¦

2 F()l~ (;O~ ll3 I~A~,';

6 ¦ - Background of the Invention 7 I _ 9 ¦ Field of the Invention 10 ¦ This invention relates generally to bags for carrying golf 11 ¦ clubs and more particularly to an improved throat structure for 12 I facilitating placement and removal of the golf clubs in the bag 13 ¦ and providing improved golf club group segregation.

16 ¦ Description of the Prior Art 17 Golf clubs have been stored, carried, and otherwise trans-18 ported in especially designed golf bags for many years. Mos-t golf 19 bags are in the form of a tubular fabric container generally of cylindrlcal conflguration having a closed bottom and an open top, 21 or throat, through which the golf clubs are inserted into and re-22 moved from the bag. When golf clubs are in such bags, the grips 23 of the clubs are in resting engagement with the closed bottom of 24 the bag, and the heads of the clubs extend more or less axially from the open throat of the bag. By positioning the golf clubs 26 in the bag in this manner, the clubs can be identified for club 27 selection purposes by a golfer in that the configurations of the 28 heads vary in accordance with the intended usage and are for the 29 most part generally provided with suitable identifying indicia.

l ~23S67S

1 ¦ Although the number of golf clubs carrie~ in golf bags ~"ill 2 vary, the rules of golf dictate ~hat the maxim~m number of cl~bs

3 carried while playing will be fourteen. From ~his, it will be

4¦ appreciated that even though the clubs vary in configura~ion and 51 are provided with identifying indicia, selecting a desired club 6 ¦from the relatively large number of clubs can be distracting and 7 ¦sometimes frustrating. And, after the desired club has ben identi 8 ¦fied, removal of the club is not always easy in that the clubs can, 9 ¦and often do, become entangled in the bag.
0 ¦ For the above reasons, most golf bags are provided with 11 ¦throat structures which separate the clubs into segregated sroup-12 ¦ings which are, of course, determined by individual preference.
13 ¦For example, the woods are usually segregated by the throat struc-14 ¦ture of the golf bag into one group, the low number, or long and 15 ¦middle distance irons into another group, and the higher number, 16 ¦or short distance irons, and the putter into a third group.
17 ¦ The open top, or throat structure of most prior art golf bags 18 ¦are usually in the form of a substantially circular ring-shaped 19 ¦body having a spaced pair of linear dividers placed therein so 20 ¦ that the dividers form equal chords within the circular ring-21 ¦ shaped body. The dividers are usually tubular struc~ures formed 22 ¦ by folding a relatively heavy gage, usually synthetic, leather-23 ¦ like material, and stitching tlle alignecl longiLuclinal edgc-;
24 together. Such dividers are normally mounted in the ring-shaped body by an elongated strap which is threadingly passed through 26 the tubular dividers and through sultable openings in the body 27 with a bucl~le being used'to secure the strap, and thus the divi-28 ders in place.
29 In throat structures which are ciivided as described above into three approximately equ~lly sized open areas, most gol~ers lZ~5675 1 place -their woods, usually thre-~, in one area, their putter and 2 three or so short distance irons in another a~ea, l~ith thc cen~ral 3 area being used for containment of the middle and long distance 4 irons. While these three open areas are a considerable improve-ment over a non-divided throat structure with regard to segregatio 6 and ease of club removal, the club entanglement problem is still 7 quite bad particularly with regard to the central opening which 8 can contain as many as seven or eight clubs if the golfer divides 9 the clubs in the usual manner as described above.
0 In some golf bags, a third divider is sometimes employed to ll further provide the throat structure with an additional nurnber of 12 club separating open areas. The third divider is formed in the 13 same manner as described above and is mounted-below the other two 14 dividers and lies on a diameter of the ring-shaped body and is transverse with respect to the other two dividers. Therefore, the 16 third divider wiIl provide six separate openings through the ring lq shaped body. This -type of throat structure is limited for use in 18 relatively large diameter golf bags in that if used in relatively 19 smaller diameter bags, the open area of each of the six openings would be too smaIl and would therefore hamper facile insertion and 21 removal of the golf clubs.
22 ln view of the above, i-t will be seen that in most ins-tances, 23 the three open golf club segregation areas in many of the prior 24 art golf bags is not enough for ideal golf club group segregation purposes, and the six open areas provided in other prior art 26 structures is too many.
27 In yet another prior art golf bag, the throat structure is 28 divided into four open club segregation areas which is believed to 29 be a proper number for ideal club group segre~gation purposes.
330 This four open club segregation area throat structure is formed ~ ~/
~Z3S6~5 1 by employing the two linear dividc-rs ~n f~lc~ ring-shaped hody, in 2 the same manrler as the Eirs~ hereirlijefore (Ic!;(rii,(~l ~hro~t s~ruc-3 ture, and interconnecting the cliviclers with a cross rib ~It th(' 4 centers thereof. This divides the central opening into two equal halfs.
6 In all prior art golf bags known to me, another shortcoming 7 e~ists, and for clarity of the description of this shortcoming, 8 the first hereinbefore described prior art golf bag throa-t struc-9 ture will be employed in the description.
0 As is welil known, when a golf bag is carried it will normally 11 be disposed at an angle relative to the ground with the throat 12 structure of the bag lying in a more or less upwardly facing angu-13 lar attitude. Therefore, the open golf club group segregation 14 areas provided in the golf bag throat structures may be defined as including an upper opening, an intermediate opening, and a lower 16 opening. The lower portions of the upper and intermediate open-17 ings are defined by the linear dividers and when a golf bag lS
18 being carried, those linear dividers ideally lie in a~horlzontal 19 attitude, with the shafts of the golf clubs resting thereon.

, . .. . .. . . . . .... . .
However, it is virtually impossible to keep those dividers in the : , - , ~ , . . , .. ; .. .~ .. . , ,. "
21 desired horizontal attitude and the result is that the gole clubs 22 will tend to collect in one corner or the other of their respec-23 tive segregated opening. This will not happen in the lower com-24 partment in that the bottom portion thereof is defined by an 2~ arcuate part of the ring-shaped body. When the golf clubs gather 26 in the corners as described above, the golf clubs in the upper and 27 intermediate openings will gather in adjacent corners of their 28 respective openings. This causes shifting and uneven weight dis-29 tribution in the golf bag which makes it more difficult to carry the bag. However, a more troublesome problem reslJIis from l:he 32 __~__ 1 ¦heads of the golf clubs becorning e~ntancllcd, ma~ing individual club 2 ¦iclentification and extraction more difficult 3 ¦ Another problem with the above described prior art golf baa 4 ¦.hroat structures is that of the golL clubs nanging-up, or catch-

5 ¦ing in the throat structures as the clubs are being extracted from

6 ¦the golf bag. The grips 2rovided on golf clubs are, by necessity,

7 ¦of larger diameter than the shaf-ts of the clubs. Therefore, the

8 ¦grips present an annular lip which faces upwardly toward the throa

9 structure when the golf clubs are in the golf bag. Also, the golf 0 club grips are tapered so that they gradually increase in diameter 11 from the lips ~o the terminal ends thereof. A large part of the 12 catching problem occurs at the corners of the open club segrega-13 tion areas defined by the throac structures. In other words, at 14 the intersections of the ends of the dividers and the ring-shaped body, and at the in-tersections of the d viders themselves in 16 throat structures which are divided into rnore than the three open 17 golf club segregation areas. The lip of the golf ciub grips often 18 catch in these corners and sometimes the clubs become wedged there 19 in due to the tapered configuration of the grips.
Therefore, a need exists for a new and impr~ved golf bag 21 throat structure which overcomes some of the problems and short-22 comings of the prior art.

Summary of the Invention 27 In accordanee with the present invention, a new and improved 28 golf bag throat structure is diselosed which has improved golf 29 club segregation properties and i~proved golf club insertion and extrac-tion eharacteristies.

32 __5__ ~3S67S 7865~17 The invention provides a throat structure for the top end of a golf bag comprising:
l(a) a ring-shaped body means defining a bore; and l(b) divider means in the bore of said ring-shaped body to divide the bore into four separated open golf club segregation areas, said divider means including, I. a first cross bar having a center and includ-ing a pair of arms which extend oppositely and angularly from the center of said first cross bar with those arms being dis-posed to define an obtuse included angle therebetween, II. a second cross bar having a center and includ-ing a pair of arms which extend oppositely and angularly from the center of said second cross bar with those arms being dis-posed to define an obtuse included angle therebetween, III. said first and second cross bars being dis-posed so that the included obtuse angles defined by their respec-tive pairs of arms face in opposite directions and being further disposed so that the centers of said first and second cross bars are in spaced apart relationship with respect to each other, IV. a rib transversely extending between the spaced apart centers of said first and second cross bars for interconnecting the spaced apart centers of said first and second cross bars.
With the divider means being configured as described above, and with a relatively short center rib, a pair of open diametrically opposed relatively large golf club segregation areas, i.e., the upper and lower openings, are provided, with the transverse diametrically opposed pair of open segregation areas, i.e., the intermediate openings, being relatively small.
The upper open segregation area is bounded on the bottom portion by the two arms of one of the divider cross bars with the two arms thereof sloping toward the center of that ``' ~Z3S6'75 cross bar. Thus, when a golf bag having the throat structure of the present invention is being carried, the clubs that are grouped in the upper open segregation area will tend to be con-centrated at a point slightly above the center o the ring-shaped body. The golf clubs grouped in the lower segregation opening, will tend to be concentrated in the center at the bottom of the ring-shaped body due to the arcuate portion of the ring-shaped body which defines the lower part of the lower opening. The golf clubs which are dispose~ in the two inter-mediate open segregation areas will -6a-- - -1~35675 1¦ tend to be concentrated at opposite sides of the ring-sha~ed ~ody 2 ¦at the lowermost outwardly disposed corners of their respective 3 ¦open segregation areas due to the downwardly and oppositely slop-4 ¦ing arms of the lower divider cross bar.
5 ¦ In view of the above, it will be seen that thc above descri-6 ¦bed dividing means will se2ara.e the groups of golf clubs as far 7 ¦apart from each other as is possible within the confines of ~he 8 ¦ring-shaped body, and will tend to hold -the separated groupings 9 ¦in the widely separated locations, thus eliminating, or at least 0 ¦ minimizing the prior art weight shiftlng problem and the head 11 ¦entanglement problem resulting from the different club groupings 12 ¦ gathering in adjacent corners of their respective open segrega-13 tion areas.
14 The problem with golf clubs catching in the prior art golf bag throat structures when the clubs are being extracted therefrom 16 is eased in the throat structure of the present invention by pro-17 viding relatively large radii in the oorners of the open areas, 18 and the radii are sized to be at leas-t approximately equal to the 19 radius of the large end of golf club grips.
In a first embodiment of the golf bag throat struct~re of the 21 presc~nt invention, Lhe ring-sha~cd body arlcl Lh(~ clivid(L me~Jrls are 22 molded or otherwise formed as a unitary structure from a suitable 23 synthetic resin. In a second embodiment, the divider means and 24 the ring-shaped body are made as separate pieces which are assem-bled during fabrication of a golf bag. The assembly may be 26 accomplished in various suitable ways, such as by using fasteners, 27 rivets for example, or by the conventional method of threadingly 28 passing a strap through the divider means and the ring-shaped body 29 and using a buckle to demountably secure the strap, and thus the divider means, in the body.

32 j __7__ ~LZ3S67S

1 Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention ~o 2 provide a new and improved open top, or throat st~ucture for use 3 in golf bags.
4 Another object o~ the present invention is to provide a new and improved golf bag throat struct-tre which is configured to 6 provide improved golf club group segregation characteristics and 7 has improved golf club eY~traction properties.
8 Another ob~ect of the present invention is to provide a new 9 and improved throat structure for golf bags which includes a ring-shaped body having a divider means therein which provides four 11 especially configured open and separated areas which inherently 12 keeps golf club groupings in widely spaced locations during the 13 carrying of the golf bag.
14 Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved golf bag throat structure of the above described 16 character wherein the divider means incluces a spaced pair of an-17 gular cross bars which are interconnec'ed at their centers to pro- 5 18 vide the four open and separated golf club group segregation areas ' 19 Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved golf bag throat structure of the above described 21 character wherein the angular divider means is configured to pro-22 vide a first pair of diametrically opposed open segregation areas 23 and a second pair of disposed diametrically opposed open segrega-24 tion are\as with the second pair being transversely disposed with respect to the first pair.
26 Another ob~ect of the present invention is to provide a new 27 and improved golf bag throat structure of the above described typ~
28 wherein the angular cross bars face in opposite directions and 29 each has an oppositely and angularly diverging pair of arms which 31 define an included obtuse angle with adjacent pairs of the arms 3~ --8---- /~ :
.lZ35675 1.

1 of the cross bars defining an acute included angL~
2 Still another object of -the present invention is to pro~Jide 3 a new and improved golf bag throat struc~ure of the abovc described 4 character wherein the corners of each of the four open and separa- li ted golf club segregation areas are formed with radii which are at¦
6 least substantially equal to the largest radius provided on a golf¦
7 club grip to minimize golf club hang-up, or catching on the throat¦
8 structure when the clubs are being extracted from the golf bag.
9 The foregoing and other objects-of the present invention, as well as the invention itself, may be more fully understood from 11 the following description when read in conjunction with the accom-12 ¦panying dr-wings 32 __9__ lZ3S675 1 Brief Descripti.on of the Drawings 2 ~ - - ~
3 FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a typical golf bag which is 4 provided with the throat structurc of the present invention.

6 FIG. 2 is an enlarged plan view of a firs-t embodimenc of the 7 golf bag throat structure of the present invention showing the 8 various features thereof.

11 FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG.2.
12 FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 2 and showing a second 13 embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectiorlal view taken along 16 the line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

18 FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sec-tional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 4.
21 FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 5 22 and showing a modified form of the second embodiment of the -throat 23 structure of the present invention.

- 32 --lO--. /' I' ~3S675i 1 Description of the Preferred Embodiments 3 Referring more particularly to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows a 4 typical type of golf bag structure which is identified in its entirety by the reference numeral 10. As is customary, the golf 6 bag 10 includes a tubular container body 12 which, in light weight 7 and relatively small golf bags, such as the one shown in FIG. 1, 8 is usually formed of a suitable synthetic material, such as nylon.
9 In larger and heavier golf bags (not shown) a heavier fabric, such as vinyl coated cloth is most often used. The bag 10 further in-11 cludes a bottom closure member 14 which is a cup-shaped rigid 12 structure that is stitched or o-therwise fastened in the bottom of 13 the tubular body 12. A suitable carrying strap 16 is also provi-14 ded as is customary.
As will hereinafter be described in detail, the golf bag 10 16 is provided with an especlally configured open top, or throat 17 structure 18, which is suitably mountcd in the top of the tubular 18 container body 12 such as by sewing as indicated at 20 in FIG. 1.
19 As seen best in FIGs. 2 and 3, the throat structure 18 in-cludes a ring-shaped body 22 of substantially cylindrical configu-21 ration, with the lower edge 24 lying in a plane transverse to the 22 axis of the body and the upper edge 26, which is rolled over as 23 shown, lying in a plane which is angularly disposed with respect 24 to the axis. This angular orientation of the upper edge 26 or the known alternative of an axially offset two-tier, or stepped upper 26 edge (not shown) of the ring-shaped body is well known in the art 27 and is employed for access and bag balancing purposes.
28 As shown, the carrying strap 16 is attached to the highest 29 point on the ring-shaped body 22. This is done for the above men-tioned bag balancing purpose and the strap 16 may be attached in 31 various ways, such as by means of a suitable flap 22 which is ` lZ35675 1 looped over the ring-shaped body 22 and is suitahly secured t~ere-2 to so as to captively retain a metallic ring to which the strap 15 3 is demountably attached such as by means of a suitable clip.
4 The throat structure 18 further includes a divider means 30 which, in this first embodiment, is molded or otherwise integrally 6 formed with the ring-shaped body 22. The divider means 30 is con-7 figured to divide the bore of the ring-shaped body into four open 8 golf club group segregating areas, 32, 34, 36 and 38, and this is 9 accomplished by a pair of cross bars 40 and 42, which are spaced apart and having their centers interconnected by a rib 44. The 11 cross bars 40 and 42 are curved or otherwise bent at their centers 12 to provide the cross bar 40 with a pair of arms 46 and 48 which 13 extend at a diverging angle from one end of the center rib 44 and 14 to similarly provide the other cross bar 42 with a pair of arms 50 and 52 which extend at an oppositely facing diverging angle 16 from the opposite end of the center ~^ib 4~. The diverging, or 17 included angles between the arms 46 ald 48 of the cross bar 40 and 18 ¦the arms 50 and 52 of the cross bar 42 are preferably obtuse which 19 ¦of course, results in the included angles between the adjacent 20 ¦ arms 46 and 50, and the adjacent arms 48 and 52 being acute. The 21 ¦specific angles are not critical, however, excellent golf club 22 ¦group segregating characteristics result from orienting the arms 23 146, 48, 50 and 52 of the cross bars 40 and 42, respectively, so 24 ¦ that the included obtuse angles are approximately 130, and the 25 ¦ acute included angles are approximately 50. When configured in 26 ¦ this manner, the diametrically opposed pair of open segregating 27 ¦ areas 32 and 36 are relatively large and ideal for segregating, 28 ¦ for example, the woods of a golf club set ~not shown) in the area 29 ¦ 32, with the putter and short distance irons in the area 36. The 30 ¦ transverse diametrically opposed open areas 34 and 38 are rela-31 l ~ ~ ~LZ356~5 ' I

1¦ tively smaller and are ideal for jointly segregating the middle 2 ¦and long distance irons of the golf club set (not shown).
3 ¦ As hereinbefore described, when a golf bag is being carried 4 ¦by means of the shoulder strap 16, it will normally be oriented so 5 ¦that the open area 32 will be at the top or upper part of the body 6 ¦22, the open area 36 will be at the lower part of the body, and th 7 ¦open areas 34 and 38 will be intermediate and laterally disposed i 8 ¦the ring-shaped body. This type of orientation is indicated best 9 ¦in FIG. 2, and due to the above described angular relationships of

10 ¦arms 46, 48 and 50, 52, of the divider cross bars 40 and 42, re-

11 ¦spectively, the golf club groupings (not shown) will tend to gathe

12 ¦and be held in specific locations within the open segregation area

13 ¦Due to the upwardly opening angular orientation of the divider

14 ¦cross bar 40, the golf club group (not shown) containable in the

15 ¦upper open segregation area 32 will tend to gather and stay at the

16 center of that cross bar. Of course, all the clubs can't simulta-

17 neously occupy the exact central location. Therefore, the clubs

18 will be spread along the cross bar somewhat. Due to this, the

19 heads of the clubs located in the upper segregation area 32 will hang down, and thus more or less overlay the central rib 44. The 21 golf club grouping in the open bottom segregation area 36 will 22 simllarly gather and stay in the center part of the arcuate por-23 tion of the ring-shaped body 22 which defines the lower part of 24 the bottom area, as is usual in rnost golf bags. The heads of the clubs located in the open bottom area 36 will hang down and thus 26 not overlay any portion of the bore of the ring-shaped body. The 27 right hand, as viewed in FIG. 2, intermediate area 34 is configu-28 red so that the golf club grouping containable in that area will 29 tend to gather and stay in the corner formed at the intersection of the downwardly angularly extending arm 52 and that arcuate ~ iZ3S6~5 1 portion of the ring-shaped body 22 which bounds the rignt hand 2 ¦side of the open area 34 . Some of the heads of the clubs contain-3 ¦able in the right hand open segregation area 34 will hang do~.1n 4 ¦over the right hand side of the bottom open area 36 while others 5 ¦will be outside of the ring-shaped body 22 to the right and sorne-6 ¦what above the heads of the clubs containable in the bottom segre-7 ¦gation area 36. Similarly, the yolf club grouping containable in 8 ¦ the left hand intermediate open segregation area 38 will tend to 9 ¦ gather and stay in the lower left corner formed by the intersec-10 ¦ tion of the angularly and downwardly sloping arm 50 and the arcu-11 ¦ ate portion of the ring-shaped body 22 which defines the left side 12 ¦ of the open area 3~8. The heads of the clubs containable in that 13 ¦ open area 38 will hang down in the same manner as those in the ld5 ¦ right hand open area 34 and thus will be generally to the left oLf 15 ¦ the center of the open bottom area 36. ;~
16 ¦ As shown, the opposite sides of the center rib 44 are curved 17 ¦ as indicated at 54 in FIG. 2. The extending ends of the arms 46, -18 ¦ 48, 50 and 52, are also curved, or flared, at the junctions of 19 ¦ those arms with the ring-shaped body 22, and the cross bars 40 and

20 ¦ 42 are curved in the central areas thereof where they are bent.

21 ¦ Therefore, each corner within the entire throat structure 18 has

22 ¦ a relatively large radius, and those radii are selected to minim-

23 ¦ ize the catching, or hanging-up of the golf clubs when they are

24 ¦ being extracted from the golf bag lO. The different corner radii

25 ¦ in the throat structure 18 are sized so that they are at least

26 ¦ substantially equal to the radius of the largest part of golf club

27 ¦ grips. In this manner, problems of the clubs becoming wedgingly

28 ¦ caught in the corners of the throat structure, and the lips of the

29 ¦ golf club grips catching in those radiused corners is substantial-

30 ly reduced.

31

32 --14-- ` ~-. I

~3S~75 1 As seen best in FIG. 3, the divider mcans 30 is preferabL~
2 recessed axially rom the top sur~acc 26 of the ring-shapcd body 3 22. And, the divider means 30 is preferably configured so that 4 the upper surfaces 56 and 57 of the cross bars 40 and 42, respec-tively, lie in different axially spaced parallel planes, and the 6 upper surface 58 of the center rib 44 extends angularly between 7 the cross bars to form a transition surface. None of these featu-8 res are critical in that the objectives of the invention would be 9 achieved with no axial recessing of the divider means 30, or by being further recessed than is shown, and, obviously, the axially 11 spaced top surface placement of the divider means 30 may be varied 12 The throat structure 18 fully described above is molded or 13 otherwise formed as a unitary structure of a suitable material, 14 such as synthetic resin. This type of structure is suitable for use with many golf bags, particularly the li~ht weight relatively 16 small carrying -bjags. However, the throat structure 18 is not well lq suited for use in some golf bags, maiilly the larger and heavier 18 bags due to the manner in which that type of golf bag is made.
19 In these heavier types of golf bags, it is a common ~ractice to use a metallic ring 60, as shown in FIGs. 4, 5, 6 and 7, which is 21 wrapped in the vinyl coated cloth, or equivalent material 61 of 22 which the bag is made, and thus the ring is an integral part of 23 the tubular container body 62.
24 When the ring-shaped body 60 is an integral part of the golf bag, the divider means 64 is formed as an insert which may be 26 mounted in the ring-shaped body in various ways. As shown in 27 FIGs. 4, 5 and 6, the divider means 64 is configured so that a 28 strap 65 having a suitable buckle 66 on one end thereof is employ-29 ed in the manner which will hereinafter be described in detail.
The divider means 64 is similar to thc hcrcillberorc describcd 32 __L5__ ~L2~3S~5 1 divider means 30 and thus includes a pair of oppositely facing 2 angular cross bars 68 and 70, which are bent at their centers with 3 the centers being interconnected by a rib 72. ~rhe cross bar 68 4 has a pair of arms 73 and 74 which divergingly extend from one end of the center rib 72 and preferably define an obtuse included 6 angle. The cross bar 70 has a pair of arms 75 ~nd 76 which extend 7 oppositely and divergingly from the opposite end of the center rib 8 and also preferably define an obtuse included angle. In this man-9 ner, when the golf bag is being carried by the shoulder strap (not shown) the cross bar 68 defines the lower edge of the upper open 11 golf club group segregation area 78. The other cross bar 70 will, 12 in conjunction with the ring-shaped body 60, define the lower boun- .
13 daries of the intermediate open golf club group segregation areas 14 80 and 82 and will further define the upper boundary of the lower o?en golf club group segregation area 84.
16 The extending terminal ends 85 and ~6 of the arms 73 and 74, 17 respectively, of the upper cross bar ,8 are flared as shown as are 18 the terminal ends 87 and 88 of the arms 75 and 76, respectively, 19 of the lower cross bar 70. These flared ends 85, 86, 87 and 88 of the cross bars 68 and 70, along with the arcuate opposite sides 90 21 of the center rib 72, provide the radiused corners of the open 22 segregation areas 78, 80, 82 and 84 in the manner hereinbefore 23 fully described, and thus reduce golf club extraction problems.
24 The cross bars 68 and 70 are tubular with at least the ex-tending ends 85, 86, 87 and 88 thereof being of enclosed cross 26 section. The ends of the cross bars 68 and 70 are open and they 27 align with slots 92 that are provided through the ring-shaped 28 body 60. The strap 65 is threaded through the cross bars 68 and 29 70 and the aligned slots 92 and thus demountably attaches the divider means 64 within the ring-shaped body 60 in a manner well 31 known in the art.

123~67~
.
1¦ A modified divider mean.s 64a ls shown in FI~; 7 as ~eing 2 ¦mounted in the ring-shaped ~ody hOa. In this -nodi~ication, each ,~
3 ¦of the four arms 94 (one shown) of the divider means G4a have thei~
4 ¦flared extendinq terminal ends 95 closed by méans of an end wall 5 196, and suitable rivets 98, or other fastener means, rnay be used 6 ¦to mount the divider means 64a within the ring-shaped body 50a.
7 While the principles of the invention have now been made 8 clear in the illustrated ernbodiments, there will be immediately 9 obvious to those skilled in the art, many modifications of struc-ture, arrangemen~s, proportions, the elements, materials, and 11 components used in the practice of the invention, and otherwise, 12 which are particularly adapted for specific environments and 13 operation requirements without departing from those principles.
14 The appended claims are therefore intended to cover and err.orace any such modifications within the limits only of the true spirit 16 ¦ and scope of ~ inventlon.

Claims (18)

THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN EXCLUSIVE
PROPERTY OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:
1. A throat structure for the top end of a golf bag comprising:
1(a) a ring-shaped body means defining a bore; and 1(b) divider means in the bore of said ring-shaped body to divide the bore into four separated open golf club segregation areas, said divider means including, I. a first cross bar having a center and includ-ing a pair of arms which extend oppositely and angularly from the center of said first cross bar with those arms being dis-posed to define an obtuse included angle therebetween, II. a second cross bar having a center and includ-ing a pair of arms which extend oppositely and angularly from the center of said second cross bar with those arms being dis-posed to define an obtuse included angle therebetween, III. said first and second cross bars being dis-posed so that the included obtuse angles defined by their respec-tive pairs of arms face in opposite directions and being further disposed so that the centers of said first and second cross bars are in spaced apart relationship with respect to each other, IV. a rib transversely extending between the spaced apart centers of said first and second cross bars for interconnecting the spaced apart centers of said first and second cross bars.
2. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 wherein the included angles defined by the pair of arms of said first and the pair of arms of said second cross bars are obtuse angles of about 130°.
3. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 wherein said rib has opposite sides each of which is of arcuate configuration.
4. A throat structure as claimed in claim 3 wherein the opposite arcuate sides of said rib have a radius which is approximately equal to the largest radius of a golf club grip.
5. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 wherein each of the opposite ends of said first and said second cross bars are flared to form radii at the junctions of the opposite ends of said first and said second cross bars and said ring-shaped body.
6. A throat structure as claimed in claim 5 wherein the radii formed at the junctions of the ends of said first and said second cross bars and said ring-shaped body are approximately equal to the largest radius of a golf club grip.
7. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 wherein the upper surfaces of said first and said second cross bars lie in different spaced apart parallel planes.
8. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 wherein said divider means and said ring-shaped body are formed as an inte-gral unitary structure.
9. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 wherein said divider means and said ring-shaped body are separate structures and means are provided for mounting said divider means in said ring-shaped body.
10. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 and further comprising:
(a) said first cross bar of said divider means is tubular with the opposite ends being open and proximate the internal bore defining surface of said ring-shaped body;
(b) said second cross bar of said divider means is tubular with the opposite ends being open and proximate the internal bore defining surface of said ring-shaped body; and (c) means for mounting said divider means in the bore of said ring-shaped body.
11. A throat structure as claimed in claim 10 wherein said means for mounting said divider means in the bore of said ring-shaped body comprises:
(a) said ring-shaped body having four slots formed therethrough each of which aligns with a different one of the open ends of said first and said second cross bars of said divider means;
(b) strap means threadingly disposed in said first and said second cross bars of said divider means and passing through said slots of said ring-shaped body in a manner which places the opposite ends of said strap means proximate each other; and (c) means for releasably interconnecting the opposite ends of said strap means.
12. A throat structure as claimed in claim 11 wherein said means for releasably interconnecting the opposite ends of said strap means is a buckle.
13. A throat structure as claimed in claim 1 and further comprising:
(a) said first cross bar of said divider means is tubular with the opposite ends thereof being closed and proxi-mate the internal bore defining surface of said ring-shaped body;

(b) said second cross bar of said divider means is tubular with the opposite ends thereof being closed and proxi-mate the internal bore defining surface of said ring-shaped body; and (c) means for mounting said divider means in the bore of said ring-shaped body.
14. A throat structure as claimed in claim 13 wherein said means for mounting said divider means in the bore of said ring-shaped body comprises fastener means at each of the closed extending ends of said first and said second cross bars of said divider means for connection thereof to said ring-shaped body.
15. A throat structure for the top open end of a golf bag comprising:
(a) a ring-shaped body means defining a substantially cylindrical bore; and (b) divider means in the bore of said ring-shaped body for dividing the bore into a first open pair of diametrical-ly opposed golf club segregation areas and a second open pair of diametrically opposed golf club segregation areas, said divider means including:
I. a first cross bat having a center and including a pair of arms which extend oppositely and angularly from the center of said first cross bar with those arms being disposed to define an obtuse included angle therebetween, II. a second cross bar having a center and including a pair of arms which extend oppositely and angularly from the center of said second cross bar with those arms being disposed to define an obtuse included angle therebetween, III. said first and said second cross bars being dis-posed so that the included angles defined by their respective pairs of arms face in diametrically opposed directions and being further disposed so that the centers of said first and second cross bars are in spaced apart relationship with respect to each other, IV. a rib transversely extending between the spaced apart centers of said first and second cross bars for intercon-necting the spaced apart centers of said first and second cross bars.
16. A throat structure as claimed in claim 15 wherein the included angles defined by the pair of arms of said first cross bar and the pair of arms of said second cross bar of said divider means are obtuse angles of approximately 130°.
17. A throat structure as claimed in claim 15 wherein said ring-shaped body and said divider means are formed as an integral unitary structure which is configured so that each of the corners of said first and said second open pairs of diametrically opposed golf club segregation areas are provided with a radius which is at least substantially as large as the largest radius of golf club grips.
18. A throat structure as claimed in claim 15 and further comprising:
(a) said first and said second cross bars of said divider means each having their opposed extending ends terminat-ing proximate the inner bore defining surface of said ring-shaped body;
(b) means for connecting the terminal ends of said first and said second cross bars to said ring-shaped body;
(c) each of the terminal ends of said first and said second cross bars being flared to provide a radius at each corner of said first and said second open pairs of diametrically opposed golf club segregation area with those radii being at least substantially as large as the largest radius of a golf club grip; and (d) said rib having opposite sides which are curved inwardly toward each other and have a radius which is at least as large as the largest radius of a golf club grip.
CA 465723 1984-03-08 1984-10-18 Throat structure for golf club bags Expired CA1235675A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US06587453 US4596328A (en) 1984-03-08 1984-03-08 Throat structure for golf club bags

Publications (1)

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CA1235675A true CA1235675A (en) 1988-04-26

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Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 465723 Expired CA1235675A (en) 1984-03-08 1984-10-18 Throat structure for golf club bags

Country Status (4)

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US (1) US4596328A (en)
JP (1) JPH0422594B2 (en)
CA (1) CA1235675A (en)
GB (1) GB2155341B (en)

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Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
JP1748412C (en) grant
JPS60188186A (en) 1985-09-25 application
US4596328A (en) 1986-06-24 grant
CA1235675A1 (en) grant
GB2155341A (en) 1985-09-25 application
GB2155341B (en) 1987-12-02 grant
GB8423607D0 (en) 1984-10-24 grant
JPH0422594B2 (en) 1992-04-17 grant

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