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Electric liquid atomizing apparatus

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Publication number
CA1178191A
CA1178191A CA 387254 CA387254A CA1178191A CA 1178191 A CA1178191 A CA 1178191A CA 387254 CA387254 CA 387254 CA 387254 A CA387254 A CA 387254A CA 1178191 A CA1178191 A CA 1178191A
Authority
CA
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
liquid
cavity
fuel
electric
air
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA 387254
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Naoyoshi Maehara
Takashi Uno
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Panasonic Corp
Original Assignee
Panasonic Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D11/00Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space
    • F23D11/34Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space by ultrasonic means or other kinds of vibrations
    • F23D11/345Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space by ultrasonic means or other kinds of vibrations with vibrating atomiser surfaces
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B17/00Apparatus for spraying or atomising liquids or other fluent materials, not covered by the preceding groups
    • B05B17/04Apparatus for spraying or atomising liquids or other fluent materials, not covered by the preceding groups operating with special methods
    • B05B17/06Apparatus for spraying or atomising liquids or other fluent materials, not covered by the preceding groups operating with special methods using ultrasonic or other kinds of vibrations
    • B05B17/0607Apparatus for spraying or atomising liquids or other fluent materials, not covered by the preceding groups operating with special methods using ultrasonic or other kinds of vibrations generated by electrical means, e.g. piezoelectric transducers
    • B05B17/0638Apparatus for spraying or atomising liquids or other fluent materials, not covered by the preceding groups operating with special methods using ultrasonic or other kinds of vibrations generated by electrical means, e.g. piezoelectric transducers spray being produced by discharging the liquid or other fluent material through a plate comprising a plurality of orifices

Abstract

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE

An apparatus for atomizing a large quantity of liquid such as water, liquid fuels, lotions or the like comprises an atomizer including a body having a pressurization cavity for containing a liquid, a nozzle base mounted on the body and having a plurality of orifices communicating with the pressurization cavity, an electric vibrator mounted on the body, and an electric circuit means for applying an alternating voltage to the electric vibrator to vibrate the latter back and forth, for thereby expelling a large quantity of liquid droplets of small and uniform diameter successively out of the orifices.

Description

7~

1I'ITI,E OF T~IE INVENTION
2ELECTRIC LIQUID ATOMI~ING APPARATUS

4 BACKGROUND OF THE INV~NTION
Field of the Invention:
6 The present invention relates to an apparatus for 7 atomizing large quantities of liquid such as liquid fuels, 8 water, lotions or the like.
g Prior Art:
A variety of liquid atomizers have heretofore been 11 proposed and practiced in the art. One such known atomizer 12 utilizes a pump for ejecting a liquid under pressure through 13 a nozzle. According to another conventional atomizing appara-l~ tus , liquid droplets are allowed to fall onto a rotating body and caused upon hitting the latter to be atomized under centrif-16 ugal forces. These prior systems, however, require a high-17 pressure pump or a high-speed motor, are large in size and 18 costly to construct, and cannot achieve a satisfactory degree 19 of liquid atomization. There are also known ultrasonic atomizers which incorporate an ultrasonic vibrator for breaking 21 up the liquid into small droplets. One form of such ultrasonic 22 atomizer inclucles a horn vibrator for amplifying the vibrations 23 from an ultrasonic vibrator up to a level large enough to atomize 24 the liquid supplied to a distal end of the horn. This ultrasonic vibrator is disadvantageous in that the vibration amplifying 26 horn is complex in structure, difficult to machine, expensive 27 to manufacture, and fails to produce liquid droplets of satisfac-28 tory diameter. The vibrator necessitates a liquid supplying 1 devlce such as a pump, and hence is large-sized ancl cannot

2 be built inexpensively. Another known ultrasonic atomizer

3 comprises an ultrasonic vibrator mounted on the bottom of a

4 liquid container for directly transmitting ultrasonic energy into the liquid to atomize the latter with the ultrasonic 6 energy that reaches the surface of the liquid in the container.
7 Although the ultrasonic atomizing apparatus for direct ultra-8 sonic liquid atomization needs no liquid supplying unit such g as a pump and atomizes the liquid into desired droplets, the atomizer consumes a great amount of elec!~ric energy for atom-11 ization and produces ultrasonic vibrations at quite a high 12 frequency which ranges from l MHz to 2 M~z. Such high-13 frequency ultrasonic vibrations have an increased level of 14 undesirable radiation which has a great potential for causing disturbance in radio waves to be received by television and 16 radio receivers. Therefore, the atomizer is required to be 17 equipped with a vibrator driving circuit and a noise prevention 18 means, and hence is costly to construct.
19 U.S. Patent NO. 3,6~3,212 to ~oltan, patented August 2. 1972, discloses a system for ejecting a train of small 21 droplets of liquid through a single orifice in response to 22 pressure increases due to changes in volume of a piezoelectric 23 element to which electric command pulses are applied. The 24 disclosed system can produce a succession of droplets of uni-form diameter and is suitable for use in ink jet printers and 26 recorders. The prior droplet ejecting system, however, cannot 27 be used in a liquid fuel burner or a humidifier which atomizes 7~

1 a large amount of liquid, at a rate of 1 to 20 cc/min., 2 into small uniform droplets. More specifically, when the 3 voltage of supplied pulses is increased in order to produce 4 droplets in large quan-tities, the liquid is broken up into droplets of large diameter. Application of pulses at a hi~her 6 frequency makes it impossible to eject liquid droplets out 7 of the orifice. The sys-tem of Zoltan therefore fails to form 8 droplets of small and uniform diameter in large quantities.
g In U.S. Patent NO. 3,747,120 to Stemme, patented July 17, 1973, an apparatus for ejecting a succession of small 11 droplets is effective for use in recording devices such as 12 an ink jet printer, but is unable to generate large quan-13 tities of atomized liquid as small uniform droplets. The disclosed droplet generator comprises a plurality of super-imposecl plates having small-diameter channels held in coaxial 16 alignment, a structure which is quite difficult to assemble.
17 Experiments conducted by the present inventors indica-Led 1~ that the system as shown in U.S. Patent NO. 3,7~7,120 produced 19 liquid droplets at a rate of about Q ~ cc/min. even when the droplets are of an excessively lar~e diameter, and ejected 21 liquid droplets of smaller diameter at an approximate rate 22 of about 0.1 to 0.2 cc/min. Thus, Zoltan's system has ex-23 perimentally been proven to fail to eject a large quantity of 24 liquid droplets of small and uniform diameter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
26 In accordance with the present invention, an atomizer 27 includes a nozzle base having a plurali-ty of orifices defined 8~

1 therein and attached to a body of the atomizer, the orifices 2 communicating with a pressurizatlon cavity in the body. An 3 electric vibrator comprising a vibration plate and a plate 4 of piezoelec-tric ceramics bonded to the vibration plate is mounted on the body, the electric vibrator is responsive 6 to an alternating voltage applied thereacross for vibratory 7 movement to expel the liquid as fine uniform droplets out of 8 the cavity through the orifices. An electric control circuit g is connected to the electric vibrator for applying the alter-nating voltage thereacross to displace the vibrator back and 11 forth periodically for successive ejection of the liquid 12 droplets. The electric control circuit includes a means for 13 changing the alternating voltage in order to produce liquid 1~ droplets controllably ln a variety of quantities.
It is an object of the present invention to provide 16 an atomizing apparatus for producing a large quantity of fine 17 and uniform droplets of liquid.
1~ Another object of the present invention is to provide 19 a liquid atomi~ing apparatus which is relatively simple in structure, reliable in operation, small in size, and inexpen-21 sive to manufacture.
22 Still another object of the present invention is to 23 provide an atomizing apparatus including means for producing 24 atomized liquid in a variety of controlled quantities.
Still another object of the present invention is to 26 provide an atomizing apparatus which will consume a relatively 27 small amount of energy for liquid atomization.

1 The above and other objects, features and advantages 2 of the present lnvention will become more apparent from the 3 following description when taken in conjunction with the 4 accompanying drawings in which some preferred embodiments of the present invention are shown by way of illustrative 6 example.
7 ~RIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
8 FIG. 1 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of a g liquid-fuel burner which incorporates an electric liquid atomizing apparatus according to the present invention;
11 FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of an atom-12 izer of the present invention;
13 FIG. 3 is an enlarged plan view of a nozzle base in 14 the atomizer shown in FIG. 2;
FIG. 4 is an enlarged diametrical cross-sectional view 16 of the nozzle base illustrated in FI(,. 3;
17 FIG. 5 is an enlarged diametrical cross-sectional view 18 of a modified nozzle base;
19 FIG. 6 is a circuit diagram oi~ a volta~e generator for applying an alternating voltage to an electric vibrator in 21 the atomizerj 22 FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrative of waveforms of three 23 alternatin~-voltage signals for driving the electric vibrator 24 at maximum, medium, and minimum power requirements;
FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view 26 of the atomizer as it is in a droplet-expelling mode of oper-27 ation with the electric vibrator bent in one direction;

9~
1 F:[G. 9 is a vi.ew similar to FIG. 7, showing the 2 atomizer as it is in a liquid-supplying mode of operation 3 with the electric vibrator displaced in the opposite 4 direction;
FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of an atomizer 6 according to another embodiment;
7 FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view of an atomizer 8 according to still another embodiment;
g FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view of an atomizer in accordance with still another embodiment; and 11 FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view of an atomizer in 12 accordance with still another embodiment.

1~ As illustrated in FIG. 1, a liquid-fuel burner com-prises a casing 1, a fuel tank 2 housed in the casing 1, a 16 fuel leveller 4 mounted in the casing 1 and connected to the ]7 fuel tank 2 by a pipe 3 for being supplied with a liquid fuel 18 from the tank 2, and an atomizer 6 disposed in the casing 1 19 and connected to the fuel leveller 4 by a pipe 5 through which the liquid fuel can be delivered from the fuel leveller g to 21 the atomizer 6. The atomizer 6 atomizes the supplied liquid 22 fuel and ejects fuel droplets 8 thus atomized into a mixing 23 chamber located adjacent to the atomizer 6.
24 Ais is introduced by an air delivering system com-prising an air charging fan 10 which is driven by a motor 9 26 through an air delivery pipe 11. The fan 10 supplies draft 27 to an air rotator or swirling device 13 for supplying a swirling 1 s~ream of air into the mixin~ chamber 7, in which air is 2 mixed with the fuel droplets 8. The fuel-air mixture as it 3 swirls is discharged through a discharge port 14 into a 4 combustion chamber 15. The mixture is then igni.ed by an ignition means 16, producing flames 17. An exhaust gas is 6 discharged from the combustion chamber 15 through an exhaust 7 pipe 18 that extends out of the casing 1. The heat energy 8 generated by the combustion in the combustion chamber 15 is g transferred to air forced by a fan 19 to move around the combustion chamber 15, the heated air being dischargable 11 into a room in which the liquid-fuel burner is installed.
12 Thus, the liquid-fuel burner serves as a heater for discharging 13 hot air.
~ The liquid-fuel burner is equipped with a controller 20 for controlling operation of the burner, i.e., operation 16 of the fans 10, 19, the atomizer 6, the ignition means 16 and 17 o-ther components in response to command signals from a con-18 trol panel 21, and signals from a frame condition detector 22 19 and a room temperature detector (not ~3hown).
As illustrated in FIG. 2, the atomizer 6 comprises a 21 body 24 having a first pressuriæation cavity 25 which is in 22 the shape of an exponential horn. The pressurization cavity 23 25 has a cylindrical front end portion 26 having an inside 24 diameter of 3 mm on which there is mounted a circular nozzle ~5 base 27 peripherally sealed by a gasket 28 and held in position 26 by a holder plate 29 that is fastened to the body 24 by screws 27 30. The nozzle base 27 includes a central curved or parti-28 spherical portion or nozzle 31 having a plurality (thirty seven ~l~'7~

1 as illustrated in FIG. 3) of orifices 32 that are arranged 2 in rows and spaced at equal intervals or equidistantly 3 from adjacent ones. Each of the orifices 32 is horn-shaped 4 or conically tapered as shown in FIG. 4 such that an outlet end thereof on the convex side is smaller in cross-sectional 6 area than an inlet end thereof on the concave side. The 7 outlet end of each orifice 32 has a diameter of 80 ~m and 8 the inlet end thereof has a diameter of about 90 to lO0 ~m.
9 A modified nozzle base 27 illustrated in FIG. S comprises a curved portion 31 having therein a plurality of orifices 32 ll each in the form of a combined bowl and aperture.
12 The nozzle base 27 is made from a plate of stainless steel 13 having a thickness of 50 ~m by first defining the orifices l~ 32 in the plate through a one-sided etching process, and then embossing the central curved portion 31. With the one-16 sided etching process, the horn-shaped orifices 32 can be formed 17 with utmost ease and relatively inexpensively.
1?3 In FIG. 2, a circular electric: vibxator 3$ is moun-ted 19 in the cavity 25 at a rear end portion thereof, the electric vibrator 35 comprising a vibration plate 33 of metal and a 21 plate 34 of piezoelectric ceramics bonded to the vibration 22 plate 33, the vibration plate 33 being integral with a support 23 36 attached to the atomizer body 24. The body 24 and the 24 support 36 jointly define a second cavity 37 therebetween which is held in fluid communicaticn with the first cavity 25 through 26 a passage 38 extending circumferentially all around the electric 27 vibrator 35.

~7~

1 The pipe 5 is connected to a lower end of the body 2 24 in communication with the second cavity 37 through a 3 fuel filling channel 46 in the body 24. The fuel leveller 4 4 controls the level of the liquid fuel to be maintained at the position A (FIG. 2) in the pipe 5 just below the atomizer 6 6. The atomizer body 24 is secured by screws 39 to a wall 7 23 of the mixing chamber 15 with the orifices 32 opening into 8 the mixing chamber 15. The body 24 is connected at an upper g end thereof to an air suction pipe 45 coupled to a connector pipe 43 (FIG. 2) disposed upstream of the fan 10 through an 11 air suction fan 41 housed in an air suction chamber 44 and 12 coaxially connected to the fan 10 for corotation. The air 13 delivery pipe 12 is coupled through an orifice or restrictor 14 q2 to the connector pipe 43. The air suction pipe q5 is held in fluid communication with the second chamber 37 through an 16 air exhausting channel 40 in the bod~ 24. When liquid fuel 17 is supplied through the fuel filling channel 46 into the first 18 and second cavities 25, 37, air is f~rced out of these cavities 19 25, 37 through the air e~hausting channel 40 into the air suc-tion pipe 45, while preventing the liquid fuel as supplied from 21 leaking out through the orifices 32.
22 Operation of the liquid atomizing apparatus thus con~
23 structed will now be described with reference to FIGS. 1, 2, 2~ 6, 7 and 8.
In FIG. 1, when the motor 9 is energized under the 26 control of the controller 20, the air charging fan 10 and the 27 air suction fan 41 are caused to corotate, whereupon there is ~:L7~

1 developed a negative pressure of about 2 to 3 mm Ag in the 2 connector pipe 43 due to the orifice 42. The air suction 3 fan 41 also developes a negative pressure of about 5 to 10 mm 4 Ag in the air suction chamber 44 and hence in the air suction pipe 45. Since the orifices 32 are extremely small in dia-6 meter, the amount of air introduced therethrough into the 7 first cavity 25 is also extremely small. The fuel level is 8 now raised from the position A to the position s as shown in g FIG. 2, whereupon the first and second cavities 25, 37 are filled up with the liquid fuel supplied. Thus, the air suc-11 tion fan 41, the air suction chamber 44 and the air suction 12 pipe 45 jointly serve as a fuel filling system.
13 The controller 20 includes a means for generating an 14 alternating voltages to be applied to the electric vibrator 35. The means for generating alternating voltages is illus-16 trated in FIG. 6, and waveforms of generated alternating 17 voltages are shown in FIG. 7 at (a~, ~b), and (c). The 18 alternating-voltage generating means comprises an amplifying 14 output circuit including transistors '~7, ~18 and ~9, capacitors 50, Sl, resistors 52, 53, 54 and SS, and an output transformer 21 56, a Wien bridge oscillator circuit including an operational 22 amplifier 57, a diode 58, capacitors 59, 60, and 61, and 23 resistors 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, and 68, a switching circuit 24 including an N-CH FET (N-channel field effect transistor) 69, a resistor 70, and a transistor 71, and a duty-cycle controlling 26 circuit including transistors 72, 73, capacitors 74, 75, resisters 27 76, 77, 78, 79 and 80, variable resistors 81, 82, and a switch 83.

~ :~t~81~

The variable resistors 81, 82 and the switch 83 are ganged 2 together by a control 84 such that when the control 84 is 3 actuated in one direction, the resistance of the variable 4 resistor 81 is reduced, the resistance of the variable

5 resistor 82 is increased, and the switch 83 will be closed

6 when the control 84 reaches the end of the stroke in said

7 one direction. The N-CH FET 69, therefore, has a duty cycle

8 D which is rendered continuously variable by the control 84

9 at a constant frequency within the following range:
Minimum value _ D _ 1 11 The oscillator circuit can supply the amplifying out-12 put circuit with various sine-wave voltage signals, as shown 13 in FIG. 7 at (a), (b) and (c), adjustable by the control 84.
14 An output alternating voltage applied through output terminals 85, 86 across the electric vibrator 35 is variable accordingly 16 and can have waveforms as illustrated in FIG. 7 at (a), (b) 17 and (c). The average power fed to the electric vibrator 35 18 can easily and reliably be controlled by the control 84. Thus, 19 the variable resistors 81, 82 and the switch 83 jointly consti-20 tute a means for adjusting the quantity of fuel droplets ejected 21 by controlling the average power supplied to the electric vibra-22 tor 35. The controller 20 also includes a dc power supply 87 23 for supplying a dc power to the circuits therein.
24 Application of the alternating voltage across the 25 electric vibrator 35 causes the latter to vibrate, enabling 26 the atomizer 6 to atomize the liquid fuel into fine droplets.
27 When the sine-wave voltage shown in FIG. 7 at (a), (b), 28 or (c) is applied during its positive half cycle to the electric 29 vibrator 35, the latter bends toward -the first cavity 25 as ~f~ 3~

1 shown in F~IG. 8 causing a pressure increase in the first 2 cavity 25. The pressure buildup is progressively greater 3 toward the nozzle base 27 due -to the horn-shaped cavity 25.
4 The liquid fuel is then expelled out of the first cavity 25 through the orifices 32 as small and uniform droplets 8 6 having a diameter on the order of 50 ~m. While in the 7 embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2 the first cavity 25 is 8 horn-shaped, it may be of other sha~es since ejection of g fuel droplets is primarily dependent in principle on changes in volume of the first cavity which are caused by ll displacement of the electric vibrator 35. Furthermore, the 12 electric vibrator 35 may be shaped and positioned differently 13 from the foregoing embodiment provided it can cause volume l~ changes in the first cavity to propel fuel droplets through lS the orifices 32.
16 Application of the alternating voltage during the 17 negative hal~ cycle enables the electric vibrator 35 to bend 18 away from the nozzle base 27 as illustrated in FIG. 9, where-9 UpOrl a necJative pressure is developed in the first cavity 25 adjacent to the electric vibrator 35, replacing the expelled 21 liquid fuel with an additional amount of liquid fuel that is 22 supplied in the directions of arrows (FIG. 9) through the 23 passage 38. At this time, the liquid fuel is prevented from 24 flowing out of the orifices 32 due to the surface tension of the liquid at the orifices 32. With the passage 38 extending 26 circumferentially around the circular electric vibrator 35, 27 the liquid fuel can smoothly and uniformly be supplied from 28 the second cavity 37 into the first cavity 25. Static pres-29 sure on the liquid fuel in the first cavity 25 becomes negative 1 enough to prevent introduction of air through the orifices 2 32 into the first cavity 25. The second cavity 37 reduces 3 resistance to the flow of liquid into the first cavity 25, 4 an arrangement which also assists in smooth and balanced supply of the fuel into the first cavity 25 and prevention 6 f air flow back into the first cavity 25 under the negative 7 pressure buildup therein.
8 The elec-tric vibrator 35 can be bent or displaced 9 back and forth repeatedly in response to application there-across of one of alternating voltages, the waveforms of which 11 are shown in FIG. 7 at (a), (b), and (c), to eject liquid 12 droplets 8 of a very small and uniform diameter in a controlled 13 ~uanti-ty which ranges from l cc/min. to 20 cc/min.
14 There would be a danger for the nozzle base 27 to vibrate under the influence of pressures produced by the electric vi-16 brator 35, causing influx of air into the first cavity 25 17 through the orifices 32. Presence of such air in the first 18 cavity 25 reduces the pressure buildup caused by the electric l9 vibrator 35 to an extent which is sui-i-icient to prevent smooth and reliable ejection of fuel droplets 8 through the orifices 21 32.
22 Such a danger or difficulty however is completely eli-23 mina-ted by the curved nozzle portion 31 of the nozzle base 24 27, which gives the latter an increased degree of rigidity making the nozzle base 27 resistant to vibrations. The curved 26 or parti-spherical nozzle portion 31 can disperse fuel droplets 27 8 in different directions in a wide conical space in which the ~L7~

1 droplets 8 are prevented from being re-united into larger 2 droplets, and hence are available of a uniform diameter.
3 The small uniform fuel droplets 8 can easily be mixed with 4 air which is introduced in a swirling motion to help carry away the droplets 8 into the combustion chamber 15 or to 6 produce the fuel-air mixture.
7 With the horn-shaped or conical orifices 32, the liquid 8 fuel is subjected to an increased pressure in the orifices 9 32 while being expelled therethrough under the pressure build-up developed by the electric vibrator 35, and can be accelerated 11 at the outlets of the orifices 32 up to a speed great enough 12 to overcome the surface tension of the liquid fuel at the 13 orifice outlets. The horn-shaped orifices 32 also assist the 1~ liquid fuel in the first cavity 25 in separating from the ejected droplets 8 when the electric vibrator 35 is deflected 16 away from the nozzle base 27, as shown in FIG. 9.
17 FIG. 10 shows an atomizer according to another embodi-18 ment of the present invention. The atomizer comprises a 19 nozzle base 27 bonded to a body 2~, and an electric vibrator 35 located remotely from the nozzle base 27 and outwardly of 21 a cavity 25 in the body 24.
22 According to another embodiment illustrated in FIG. 11, 23 an electric vibrator 35 is in the form of a hollow cylinder 24 disposed around a cavity 25.
An atomizer in accordance with still another embodi-26 ment shown in FIG. 12 includes a flat nozzle base 27 integral 27 with a body 24 of the atomizer.

3~
1 As illustrated in FIG. 13, an atomizer according to 2 still another embodiment has an annular or doughnut-shaped 3 second cavity 37 defined in a doby 24 in surrounding relation 4 to a first cavity 25, the first and second cavities 25, 37 being held in fluid communication with each other by four 6 passages 38 (two shown) positioned near the outer periphery 7 of an electric vibrator 35 and angularly spaced 90 degrees 8 from adjacent passages 38. The passages 38 are spaced 9 equidistantly from the axial center of the electric vibrator 35 and hence the first cavity 25 for smooth and equally 11 distributed supply of liquid fuel from the second cavity 37 12 into the first cavity 25.
13 Advantages accruing from the arrangement of the present 1~ invention are as follows: No separate liquid supply unit or pump is required as the atomizer is of the self-priming type 16 for automatically replacing discharged droplets in the first 17 cavity 25 through the liquid filling channel 46. Therefore, 18 the atomizing apparatus is relatively simple in structure, 19 small in size, and inexpensive to construct. The nozzle base 27 has a plurality of orifices 32 for ejecting therethrough 21 fine and uniorm liquid droplets in large quantities in re-22 sponse to a pressure increase in the cavity 25 caused by the 23 electric vibrator 35. The air exhausting channel 40 allows 24 air to be discharged out of the cavities 25, 37 when liquid fuel is introduced through the liquid filling channel 46.
26 No liquid fuel is caused to flow out through the orifices 32 27 at the time of charging the cavity 25 with the liquid fuel.
28 The curved portion 31 serves as a stiffener for the nozzle 1 base 27 for protection against vibration of the latter during 2 operation of the atomizer 6. Accordingly, influx of air into 3 the cavity 25 through the orifices 32 is prevented for stabi-4 lized liquid atomization. The electric vibrator 35 consumes a small amount of electric power since it requires only a 6 vibratory energy to be applied to the liquid which fills the 7 cavity 25. The atomizing apparatus also has a relatively 8 small power requirement and produces a reduced amount of g noise or unnecessary energy radiation. The quantity of liquid lo droplets expelled can easily be adjusted by controlling the ll average power with which the electric vibrator 35 is energized.
12 The horn-shaped orifices 32 can easily be formed using the one-13 sided etching process. The orifices 32 thus shaped are conduc-14 tive to generation of small and uniform liquid droplets. The second cavity 37 and the symmetrically defined passage 38 16 permit liquid to be introduced smoothly into the first cavity 17 25 without developing an excess negat:ive pressure in the latter, 18 a structure which assures stable liquid atomiæation. The air 19 delivery system and the fuel filling system are coupled with each other for joint operation. This structure serves as a 21 fail-safe device to prevent an atomization process from being 22 started while the air delivery system is not operating. With 23 the air delivery system and fuel filling system thus combined, 24 the atomizing apparatus is simpler in structure and less costly to manufacture. The fuel filling system is operated 26 under air pressure and hence is relatively simple and inexpen-sive.

~7~

1 Although various preferred embodiments have been 2 shown and described in detail,it should be understood that 3 many changes and modifications may be made therein without 4 departing from the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (11)

What is claimed is:
1. An atomizing apparatus comprising:
(a) a body having a cavity for containing a liquid therein;
(b) a nozzle base mounted on said body and having a plurality of orifices defined therein and communi-cating with said cavity;
(c) an electric vibrator mounted on said body and movable to pressurize the liquid in said cavity for ejecting a quantity of the liquid as atomized droplets through said orifices; and (d) electric means for applying an alternating voltage to said electric vibrator to displace the latter back and forth periodically, whereby said atomized droplets can be expelled successively out of said orifices.
2. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 1, said body including an liquid filling channel for supplying there-through the liquid into said cavity, and an air exhausting channel for discharging therethrough air from said cavity.
3. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 1, said nozzle base including a curved portion, said orifices being defined in said curved portion.
4. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 1, said electric means including means for adjusting the quantity of droplets ejected by controlling an average power supplied to said electric vibrator.
5. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 1, each of said orifices being in the shape of a horn, and having an inlet opening into said cavity and an outlet opening away from said cavity, said inlet being larger in cross-sectional area than said outlet.
6. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 5, said orifices being formed in said nozzle base by a one-sided etching process.
7. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 1, said body including a second cavity for supplying the liquid to said first-mentioned cavity, and a passage by which said first-mentioned cavity and said second cavity are held in fluid com-munication with each other.
8. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 7, said passage being disposed adjacent to said electrical vibrator and symmetrically with respect to the axial center of said electrical vibrator.
9. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 1, further including means for filling the liquid in said cavity.
10. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 9, including means operatively coupled with said filling means for delivering air to carry therewith said atomized droplets expelled out of said orifices.
11. An atomizing apparatus according to claim 10, said filling means being responsive for its operation to an air pressure developed by said air delivering means.
CA 387254 1980-10-06 1981-10-05 Electric liquid atomizing apparatus Expired CA1178191A (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP55-140318 1980-10-06
JP14031880A JPS6029312B2 (en) 1980-10-06 1980-10-06
JP14348080A JPS6031557B2 (en) 1980-10-13 1980-10-13
JP55-143480 1980-10-13

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA1178191A true CA1178191A (en) 1984-11-20

Family

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Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 387254 Expired CA1178191A (en) 1980-10-06 1981-10-05 Electric liquid atomizing apparatus

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US4465234A (en)
CA (1) CA1178191A (en)
DE (1) DE3170523D1 (en)
EP (1) EP0049636B1 (en)

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US4465234A (en) 1984-08-14 grant
EP0049636B1 (en) 1985-05-15 grant

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