CA1133342A - Engine cylinder cutout system and control therefor - Google Patents

Engine cylinder cutout system and control therefor

Info

Publication number
CA1133342A
CA1133342A CA 348753 CA348753A CA1133342A CA 1133342 A CA1133342 A CA 1133342A CA 348753 CA348753 CA 348753 CA 348753 A CA348753 A CA 348753A CA 1133342 A CA1133342 A CA 1133342A
Authority
CA
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
rod
fluid
pushrod
tappet
valve
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA 348753
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Laszlo Tamas
Jozsef Tamas
Gino Petrillo
Original Assignee
Laszlo Tamas
Jozsef Tamas
Gino Petrillo
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L13/00Modifications of valve-gear to facilitate reversing, braking, starting, changing compression ratio, or other specific operations
    • F01L13/0005Deactivating valves
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D17/00Controlling engines by cutting out individual cylinders; Rendering engines inoperative or idling
    • F02D17/02Cutting-out
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B3/00Engines characterised by air compression and subsequent fuel addition
    • F02B3/06Engines characterised by air compression and subsequent fuel addition with compression ignition

Abstract

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE

A novel engine cylinder cutout system for internal combustion engines, e.g., gasoline engines, or diesel engines is provided herein.
The system may be operated either by fluids, e.g., pneumatic or hydraulic, or mechanically. The system includes (a) a plurality of uncoupling devices for selectively coupling or uncoupling associated valve operators from respective driven members, the cutout devices selectively operable for normal operation enabling the normal cycle of operation of the valve operators and for cutout operation interrupting the normal cycle in any phase of its operation, the plurality of cutout devices being equal in number to the number of cylinders or valves in the engine; (b) shifting mechanism for selectively operating the cutout devices to provide varia-tion of valve operation from normal cycles, allowing the valves to be opened or closed as required, and cutout operation, uncoupling selective one or ones of the valve operators so that selected exhaust valves are open while associated selected intake valves are closed; and (c) reten-tive control means responsive to the status of vehicle operating para-meters for randomly initiating operation of shifting mechanism associated with each such uncoupling device for random initial activation thereof, thereby selectively cutting out one or more cylinders in the engine a sub-stantially even average amount of time. The control means thus assures even cutout of the cylinders during different sequences of operation so that engine wear is reduced, and any such wear is even.

Description

~:~333~2 This invention relates to an improvement ~n a cylinder cutout - system for any engine which includes intake and/or exhaust valves, e.g., a gasoline internal combustion engine or a dies~l engine. More part~cularly, it relates to an improved control means to enable selective operation of the cylinder cutout system which is functional by fluid pressure or by mechanical means.
Cylinder cutout systems are intended to be used to enable multiple cylinder engines to function with fewer than all of their cylin-ders, thereby to conserve fuel when less than full power operation of the engine is necessary. Thus, a larger displacement engine in effect can be converted in service to a smaller displacement engine, with the power loss incidental to such reduction being acceptable under light load conditions.
Cylinder cutout systems attempt to modify the operation of the valves of the engine. The usual objective of these devices is to disable one or more of the cylinders of the engine by cutting off fuel thereto or - otherwise affecting the cylinder operation so that the cylinder is dead as far as fuel consumption and power output are concerned.
Jones, United States Patent No. 1,201,055, granted October 10, 1916, was an early patent teaching a cylinder cutout system wherein fuel was cut off to a single bank of six cylinders in a V-12 engine, with the intake valve of the cutoff bank being held closed and the exhaust valves being held open. The valve control system was an electromechanical arrangement adapted to work directly on the rocker arm of the v~lve train to hold the valve elements in the desired open or closed position when it was desired to deactivate the cylinders associated with the valves.
Fuller, Jr. et al, United States Patent No. 4,050,435 issued September 27, 1977, was alleged to provide an improved device to control the valves for enabling intake and exhaust valves of the cylinders of an internal combustion engine to be held respectively closed and open to ,: -- 1 ~

" 11333~2 disable some of the cylinders and thus to conserve fuel and energy. That system was alleged to be ~ simple and efficient improvement over various complex and cumbersome prior art devices, most of which required a special engine design to accommodate them. That invention was said to be designed specifically for installation in a simple manner in an existing conven-tional engine much in ehe same manner as any other engine accessory.
In the invention as taught in the above-identified United States Patent No. 4,050,435, a fluid-operated valve pushrod elongating or short-ening device was provided that could be installed as an accessory in an existing engine using a pushrod and rocker arm valve train system. The system was said to be controllable, in effect to elongate the exhaust valve pushrods and to deactivate the intake valve pushrods for each cylin-der to be cut out from engine operation. This system was also said to be controllable so that the intake and exhaust valves could operate in the . normal manner in response to the reciprocating movement of the pushrods.
Engine oil pressure preferably served as the actuating medium. The device was alleged to permit full or partial engine operation under any control set-up desired.
As described in that patent, the standard pushrod was replaced with a modified pushrod of shorter length, and the device was instslled between the shorter pushrod and the rocker arms of the valve actuating train. Control of fluid pressure (i.e., engine oil pressure) supply to the device enabled the device selectively to function as a relatively solid extension of the pushrod for a normal operation engine, as a shortened pushrod for the intake vaives or as a fluid ram or jack for holding the exhaust valve open when the pushrod was still free to reciprocate.
That United States Patent No. 4,050,435 suggested that any suitable control system could be used selectively to regulate the operation of the device. However, the patent was totally silent in respect of a ~1333~Z
suitable control means to enable the above-described selective operation of the cutout device. Since, moreover, that patent taught the use of the oil pressure of the engine to control the operation of the device, the de-vice was only operable when the oil pressure was at a predetermined mini-mun. Consequently, any disruption in a constant oil pressure would render the device, and hence the internal combustion engine itself, inoperable.
Moreover, the normal dirt and grime which accumulates in the oil from normal engine wear tends to hinder the working of this and any other such mechanism relying on engine oil pressure. Consequently, it is preferable to use brake or transmission fluid as the operating fluid.
In addition, no means were taught for any sequencing of the selective controlling of the cylinders to be cut out to enable even wear of the en~ine.
Accordingly, it is an object of a broad aspect of this invention to provide a control means which may operate substantially independently of the oil pressure system of an engine.
An ooject of another aspect of this invention is to provide a con-trol system whereby the exhaust valves may be controllably opened a small amount in order to avoid cylinder breakage and/or damage.
An object of a further aspect of this invention is to provide a control system whereby sequenciny of the cutoff of the cylinders is pro-vided in order to minimize and even avoid backfiring and blowouts.
An object of another aspect of this invention is to provide a con-trol system whereby an average rotation of the cutoff of the cylinders is provided in order to provide balanced engine wear.
An object of another aspect of this invention is to provide such a control system in which fluid pressure is used to control the uncoupling devices and in which such fluid pressure may be maintained substantially constant regardless of the state of operation of the engine.

~1333~2 An object of a further aspect of this invention is to provide a system which can be maintained in its full operating level even if there should be a drop in engine oil pressure.

An object of yet another aspect of this invention is to provide such a control system in which normal valve operation is interrupted in order to assist in start-up of the engine through temporary reduction of piston compression.
By one broad aspect of this invention, an engine cylinder cutout system is provided, comprising: (a~ a plurality of uncoupling devices for - 3a -- .

~333~Z
sel(ctively couplinc3 or urlcoupling associated valve operators from respec-tive driven members, the cutout devices being selectively operable for nor-mal operation enab3ing the normal cycle of operation of the valve opera-tors, and for cutout operation interrupting such normal cycle in any phase of its operation, the plurality of cutout devices being equal in number to the number of cylinders or valves in the engine; (b) shifting mechanism for selectively operating the cutout devices to provide variation of valve operation from normal cycles, allowing the valves to be opened or closed as required, and cutout operation, uncoupling selective one or ones of the valve operators so that selected exhaust valves can be maintained are opened in a controlled manner while associated selected intake valves can be maintained are closed; and (c) retentive control means responsive to the status of vehicle operating parameters for randomly initiating opera-tion of shifting mechanism associated with each such uncoupling device for random initial activation thereof, thereby selectively cutting out one or more cylinders in the engine a substantially even average amount of time, so that engine wear is balanced.
By a variant thereof, the uncoupling devices are operated by fluid under substantially constant desired pressure.
By a variant thereof, the uncoupling device is specially con-structed for selectively coupling or uncoupling a reciprocating pushrod member from a driven member, and for holding such driven member at a con-trolled position with respect to the pushrod member while the pushrod mem-ber motion itself is wlinterrupted, with the driven member having a return stroke driving means, the uncoupling device comprising: (a) a support means disposed between a selected pushrod member and a selected driven mem-ber; (b) a variable length member connected to the support means and relatively movable with respect thereon; (c) coupling means on the varia-~ _ 4 _ ~333~2 ble length m~mber for engaging the selected pusllrod mcmber; (d) means for select.ively operating or deactivating the coupling means, whereby - 4 a -1~333'~2 the variahle length meml)er may be selectively driven by the pushrod member when coupled thereto or, when uncoupled, not driven by the pushrod member while the motion of the pushrod is unimpeded with respect to the variable length member; (e) length-varying means movably attached to the variable length member for permitting relative motion between first and second limit positions, the variable length member being at minimum and maximum lengths, respectively, when the length-varying means is disposed at its first and second limit positions respectively, the length-varying means being driv-ingly connected to the driven member; and (f) extension-actuating means for selectively extending the length-varying means to its second limit position relative to the variable length member, and for holding the length-varying member at such position.
By another variant, the system includes at least one chamber for containing the fluid under pressure, and means for maintaining such fluid under substantially constant pressure.
By a variation thereof, the fluid under pressure is hydraulic fluid, and the constant pressure is maintained by an hydraulic accumulator.
By a further variation thereof, the above-mentioned chamber is re-mote from the uncoupling device and the system includes hydraulic fluid conduit lines leading from the cylinder to the uncoupling device, the hy-draulic fluid conduit lines including valves selectively actuated by con-trol means to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or to control or cut out selected, e.g., exhaust valves, to maintain selected such valves, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to maintain associated selected other, e.g., intake valves closed.
By yet another variation thereof, the above-mentioned chamber is part of the uncoupling device and the system includes a solenoid-operated valve selectively actuated by control means to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or to control or cut out, selected, e.g., exhaust, valves ~- 5 -11333~Z

to maintain selected such valves, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to main-tain associated selected other, e.g., intake, valves closed.

- 5 a -" 11333~Z
By a further variation, the fluid under pressure is a pneumatic fluid, and the constant pressure is maintained by a pneumatic accumulator.
By a variation thereof, the above-mentioned chamber is remote from the uncoupling device and the system includes pneumatic fluid con-duit lines leading from the cylinder to the uncoupling device, the pneu-matic fluid conduit lines including valves selectively actuated by control means to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or control or cut out selected, e.g., exhaust, valves to maintain selected such valves, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to maintain associated selected other, e.g., intake, valves closed.
By yet another variation, the above-mentioned chamber is part of the uncoupling device and the system includes a solenoid-operated, one-way, piston-type valve selectively actuated bv control means to operate intake and exhaust valves norma~ly; or to control or cut out selected, e.g., exhaust, valves to maintain selected such valves, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to maintain associated selected other, e.g., intake, valves closed.
By yet another variant, the fluid under pressure is an hydraulic fluid, and the constant pressure is maintained by a movable piston forming part of the walls of the above-mentioned chamber.
By a variation thereof, the above-mentioned chamber is remote from the uncoupling device and the system includes hydraulic fluid conduit lines leading from the cylinder to the uncoupling device, the hydraulic fluid conduit lines including valves selectively actuated bv control means to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or to control or cut out, selected, e.g., exhaust, valves to maintain selected such, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to maintain associated selected other, e.g., intake, valves closed.
By another variation thereof, the above-merltioned chamber is part of the uncoupling device and the system includes a solenoid-operated deactivation cylinder selectively actuated by control means to operate `` 11333~
lntake and e~lla~lst valves normally; or to control or cut out selected, e.g., exhaust, valves to maintain se]ected such valves, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to maintain associated selected o~her, e.g., intake, valves closed.

By yet another variant, the fluid under pressure is a pneumatic fluid and the constant pressure is maintained by a mov~ble piston forming part of the walls of the above-mentioned chamber.
By a variation thereof, the above-mentioned chamber is remote from the uncoupling device and the system includes pneumatic fluid con-duit lines leading from the cylinder to the uncoupling device, the pneu-matic fluid conduit lines including valves selectively actuated by control means to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or to control or cut out selected7 e.g., exhaust, valves to maintain selected such valves, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to maintain associated selected other, e.g., intake valves closed.
By another variation thereof, the above-mentioned chamber is part of the uncoupling device and the system includes a solenoid-operated, one-way, piston-type valve selectively actuated by control means to operate intake and exhaust valYes normally; or to control or cut out selected, e.g., exhaust, valves to maintain selected such Yalves, e.g., exhaust valves, open and to maintain associated selected other, e.g., intake, valves closed.
By another variation thereof, the retentive control means con-trols a solenoid for each of the shifting mechanism, thereby causing fluid pressure to actuate selected one or ones of the uncoupling devices.
Dy a further variant, the uncoupling devices are operated by mechanical means.
By another variant, the system includes memory means associated with the retentive control means, which serves to assure a substantially even cutout of all the cylinders of the engine during different sequences of operation so that engine wear is balanced.
By other variants, the retentive control means may be either 1~333~Z

manual.ly programmable or automatically programmable.
In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 shows a partial cut-away segment of a typical prior art valve train i.n an internal combustion engine, the valve train using hydraulic lifters, pushrods and rocker arms, conventionally refered to as tappets;
Figure 2 shows a typical installation of an uncoupling device of an embodiment of this inveniton mounted in the engine of Figure l;
Figure 3 is a schematic illustration of one variant of a shifting mechanism of an embodiment of this invention connected to control means and operating a pressure fluid system to actuate an uncoupling device;
Figure 4 is a schematic il.lustration of another variant of a shifting mechanism of an embodiment of this invention connected to control means and operating a pressure fluid system to actuate an uncoupled device;
Figure 5 is a functional block diagram showing the electronic control components of an embodiment of this invention;
Figure 6 is a first portion of the control logic shown in .~ Figure 5; and Figure 7 is a second portion of the control logic shown in Figure 5.
As seen in Figures 1 and 2, a valve-in-head internal combustion engine 10 of typical configur~tion and known in the prior art includes a cylinder head ll through wllich extend pushrods 12 disposed between hydraulic valve lifters 13 and rocker arms or tappets 14. Valves 15 are moved to an open position by rocker arms 14 in a conventional manner and are seated by means of valve springs 16. Cam 17 drives the pushrod 12 (or the pushrods directly if a mechanical pushrod system is used) in timed sequence in a manner well known in the art. This cam drive of the pushrods is not interfered with in the uncoupling device used in the cutout system ,~

1~333~Z
of aspects of this invention.
~ s seen more particularly in Figure 2, a valve uncoupling device 20 according to a broad embodimPnt of this invention is installed in the valve actuating train between the pushrods (which are modified slightly from the facotry installed pushrods~ and the rocker arm, as shown in Figure

2. Thus, the modified pushrod is installed and the valve uncoupling de-vice 20 is placed between the top end of the pushrod 21 and the rocker arm 14 to provide a tappet rod 22 to operate the rocker arm 14. Fluid ConnectioTIS 23 and 24 are made to the uncoupling device 20 and to the shifting mechanism of a suitable control system of an aspect of the present invention to be described hereinafter, for controlling the flow of fluid under pressure to the uncoupling device 20. A valve uncoupling device 20 is installed at each intake valve and at each exhaust valve of each cylinder of the engine desired to be cut out upon demand.
The valve uncoupling device 20 may be the one disclosed and claimed in United States Patent No. 4J050,435, and so its structure and operation will not be described herein, or it may be the one or ones disclosed and described hereinafter.
For normal engine operation on all cylinders, activation of the intake valves and the exhaust valves by the valve uncoupling devices 20 operatively situated in their valve trains is accomplished by supplying fluid through lines 23 and 24 under pressure in order not to interfere with the normal cam timed operation of the valves. I~hen it is desired to operate the engine with less than all cylinders, the valve uncoupling device 20 is selectively actuated in association with a selected exhaust valve to hold the selected exhaust valve open by admitting fluid under pressure through suitable line 23. At the same time, the associated selected intake y?lye is held closed by relieying pressure through line 24 of an associated valve uncoupling device.

il333~Z

It is not necessary that the shifting mechanism be plaeed remote from the uncoupling deviee 20 as eontemplated by the embodiment shown in Figure 2. Two embodiments of a shifting meehanism being plaeed adjaeent to the uncoupling device 20 ~re shown in Figures 3 and 4 (read in conjune-tion with Figures 1 and 2).
As seen in Fiyure 3, the uncouplin~ device 20 ineludes a cylinder chamber 30 eontaining fluid under pressure. The pushrod terminates in a piston head slidably movable within eylinder chamber 30 in response to re-ciprocation of pushrod 21. Tappet rod 22 includes a piston head 33 slida-bly movable within cylinder chamber 30 between an outer position (shown insolid lines) where the tappet 14 opens the valve 15, and an inner position (shown in broken lines) where the tappet 14 closes the valve 15. A second cylinder chamber 34 is provided at right angles to cylinder chamber 30 and includes a deactivating head piston 34 which may be wedge shaped having a rod 36 coupled to a solenoid 37, or to a meehanieal aetivation meehanism and spring biased by spring 38. Solenoid 37 is aetuatable by command im-pulse from control 39 or manually. Under normal operation, the fluid under pressure in cylinder ehamber 30 direetly transmits reeiproeating motion of pushrod 21 to tappet rod 22 by means of eylinder heads 32 and 33, sinee solenoid 37 maintains deaetivating eylinder head 35 in its outward posi-tion. Spring 38 maintains a substantially constant fluid pressure in cylinder chamber 30.
For cutout operation of an intake valve, solenoid 37 is actuated by control 39, or meehanieal pressure is relieved, thereby permitting deaetivating piston head 35 and its piston rod 36 to oseillate within seeond eylinder ehamber 34 and solenoid 37 respeetively, at the same rate as the reeiproeation of piston head 32 by means of pushrod 21. In other words, the resistanee to motion of deaetivating piston head 35 is less ~- 10 -11333~Z

than the rcsistance to motion of cylinder head 33 and its tappet rod 22.
Thus, reciprocation of pushrod 21 causes oscillation of deactivating cylinder 35 by fluid pressure movement of deactivating - 10 a -- 11333~2 cy~nder head 35 inwardly and resllient movmeent of deactivating cylinder head 35 out~ardly by spring 38, with tappet rod 22 remainlng substantially stationary since piston head 33 is also maintained substantially station-ary. This cuts out the intake val~e hnd maintains it closed. ~eactiva-~ion of the solenoid 37, or the reapplicati{)n of mechanical pressure allows deactivating cylinder 35 to return to its normal position for nonmal operation as described above.

For cutout operation of an exhaust valve, solenoid 37 is acti-vated when tappet rod 22 and piston head 33 is in its outer position shown in solid lines, which maintains the exhaust valve open. Such acti-vation drives deactivating cylinder head 35, which may be wedge shaped, into cylinder chamber 30 and prevents piston head 33 from moving to the inner position shown in broken lines, and thus prevents tappet rod 22 from moving to its lower posltion. Fluid under pressure propelled by reciprocation of the piston head 32 by the pushrod 21 flows into and out of the second cylinder 34 behind deactivating piston 35. In other words, reciprocation of the pushrod 21 does not translate itself into reciprocation - of tappet rod 22 or to oscillation of deactivating cylinder 35. This cuts out the exhaust valve and maintains it open. DeactiYation of the solenoid 37 or the release of mechanical pressure, allows deactivating cylinder 35 to return to its nonnal position for normal operation as described above.
As seen in Figure 4, the uncoupling device 20 includes a cylin-der chamber 40 containing fluid under pressure. The pushrod 21 terminates in a piston head 42 slidably movable within cylinder chamber 40 in response to reciprocation of pushrod 21. Tappet rod 22 includes a piston head 43 (shown in solid lines~ where the tappet 14 opens the valve 15, and an inner position (shown in broken lines) where the tappet closes the valve 15. A second fluid chamber 44 is provided at right angles to cylinder chamber 30 and includes one-way piston-type valve 45 coupled to a solenoid 47 and resiliently biased by hydraulic accumulator 48. Solenoid 47 also situated in a fluid flow passage 46 between cylinder chamber 40 and 1~3334Z

hydraulic accumulator 48. Solenoid 47 is actuatable by command impulse from control 49. Under normal operation, the fluid under pressure in cy]inder chamber 40 directly transmits reciprocating motion of pushrod 21 to tappet rod 22 by means of cylinder heads 42 and 43, since solenoid 47 maintains one-way piston-type valve 45 in its outward position by sealing off flow of fluid in flow passage 46 from cylinder chamber 40 to hydraulic accumulator 48. Hydraulic accumulator 48 maintains a substantially con-stant fluid pressure in cylinder chamber 40.
For cutout operation of an intake valve, solenoid 47 is actuated by control 49 to permit fluid to flow through one-way piston-type valve 45 and into solenoid 47 and return by resilient pressure from hydraulic accumulator 48 at the same rate as the reciprocation by means of pushrod 21. In other words, the resistance to flow of fluid through one-way piston-type valve 45 is less than the resistance to motion of cylinder head 33 and its tappet rod 22. Thus, reciprocation of pushrod 21 causes fluid flow through one-way piston-type valve 45, with tappet rod 22 remaining - substantially stationary, since piston head 43 is also maintained substan-tially stationary. This cuts out the intake valve and maintains it closed.
Deactivation of the solenoid 47 allows one-way piston-type valve 45 to control fluid flow normally for normal operation as described above.
For cutout operation of the exhaust valve, solenoid 47 is acti-vated when tappet rod 22 and piston head 43 is in its outer position shown in solid lines, which maintains the exhaust valve open . Such activa-tion allows fluid flow through passage 46, solenoid 47 and hydraulic accu-mulator 48 and drives one-way piston-type valve 45 into cylinder chamber 30 and prevents piston head 33 from moving to the inner position shown in broken lines, and thus prevents tappet rod 22 from moving to its lower - position. Fluid under pressure propelled byreciprocation of the piston head 32 by the pushrod 2' flows into and out of the fluid passage 46 and 11333~'~

solenoid 47. In other words, reciprocation of the pushrod 21 does not translate itself into reciprocation of tappet rod 22 or to fluid flow through one-way piston-type valve 45. I`his cuts out the exhaust valve and maintains it open. Deactivation of the solenoid 47 allows one-way piston-type valve 45 to return to its normal position for normal operation as described above.
While the valve uncoupling devices 20 have been described as being fluid operated devices, they can alternatively be mechanically operated devices. Thus (while not shown), the cylinders can be provided with coiled springs which can be operated to allow the tappet rod to be operated on by the pushrod; by the suitable use of wedges on the coiled springs actuated by solenoids to allow pushrod to reciprocate while tappet rod is maintained substantially constant thereby maintaining selected intake valves closed; or by suitable use of wedges on the coiled springs actuated by solenoids to allow pushrod to reciprocate while restraining tappet rod from downward movement, thereby maintaining selected - exhaust valves open.
Turning now to Figure 5, a block diagram is shown of the organi-zation of the control components, which explains how the sensed parameters~
of the vehicle are processed in a control logic lO, which controls elec-tronically-actuated solenoid groupings 1 to 4 (only solenoid groupings l and 2 being shown) via solenoid drivers 20. The vehicle-sensing functions themselves are preferably divided in two categories, the first being primary sensors for parameters of a higher priority, e.g., engine tempera-ture and vehicle brake actuation. For safety reasons, it is desirable that such primary parameters override the logic control decisions developed from the set of secondary parameters, e.g., acceleration position and speedometer reading. Each sensor output, which is generally an analog voltage proportional to the particular parameter sensed, is converted to ~13334Z

~ dlgital representation by means of an analog-to-digltal converter or encoder. Four such A/D converters 30~ 40, 50 and 60 are shown, one for each sensor. For engine temperature and brake actuation status, a single status bit for each is sufficient. For instance, if the engine tempera-ture is below the operational value, the output is a logic "0". Simi-larly, upon brake actuation the output of the A/D 40 changes from I'll' to lloll. As will be seen later in conjunction with Figure 7, a logic lloll from either A/D 30 or 40 immediately inhibits the actuation of all the solenoid groups 1 to 4, which in turn disable the uncoupling devices 20 associated with each cylinder, and the engine returns to normal operation.
Figures 6 and 7 show in detail the circuit of the control logic 10. The circuit 10 has, ns shown in Figure 6, four inputs. Two inputs designated Ao and Al from the A/D 60, and two inputs designated S0 and Sl from the A/D 50 in Figure 5. In other words, each accelerator and speedo-meter position is digitized by the respective A/D into four regions represented by two bits AOand Al and S0 and Sl. For instance, should the accelerator remain unactivated and the speedometer reading be zero, Ao~ Al, S0 and Sl would each be a logic lloll. On the other hand, should the accelerator be fully depressed, Ao and Al would change to logic llll'. The four possibilities for A~/Al and S0/Sl are, of course, 00, 01~ 10 and 11.

The four variables Ao~ Al, S0 and Sl are processed on the first portion of the logic circuit 10 shown in Figure 6 to yield two variables lo and 1, which are fed to the second portion by the logic circuit 10, shown in Figure 7. The circuit of Figure 6 comprises inverters 101 to 104, which seem to develop the complement (or negation) of each variable. A
suitable multiple inverter integr&ted circuit is Texas Instruments' TTL
logic IC SN74040 which has 6 inverters, only four of which would be used.
The circuit in Figure 6 further comprises NAND gate circuits 105, 106 and 107. The NAND circuits 105 and 107 are 3-input positive NAND circuits, J_-~, - 14 -, ~333~2 while the circuit 106 has two 4-input posltive NAND gates. TI's SN7410 is a suitable circuit, being a triple 3-input gate IC, for the gates 105 and 107, while for gates 106, SN7420 is a suitable dual 4-input IC. The basic logical relationship between the variables Ao~ Al, S0 and Sl and the outputs lo and 1 is as follows:

;~ o SO + Al SlSo; and 11 = ~1 ~o ~1 + Ao Sl So ~ Ao 1 0 Thus, it follows that for all variables at logic "0", for instance zero speed with engine idling, both lo and 11 would be a logic "1". Should S0 and Sl be a logic "1", (i.e. high speed), but the accelera-- tor be unactivated (i.e., vehicle coating at high speed), lo would be a logic "0" and 11 a logic "1".
Turning now to the second portion of the control logic 10, shown in Figure 7, the two outputs lo 11 are applied thereto as sole inputs from the secondary (lower priority) sensors. In addition, the outputs B
and T, from the high priority sensors for brake actuation and low~tempera-ture, are applied directly to the final AND gates controlling the activa-tion of the respective output devices 20 with the solenoid groupings 1 to 4. As mentioned before, brake actuation or insufficient temperature would immediately cause the final AND gates to have a logic "0" at their outputs ZO Zl Z2 and Z3. Two J-K flip-flop circuits 201 and 202 serve as latches to remember the previous status of the two variables lo and 11 prior to a change therein. The logic gate symbols shown in Figure 7 are those con-ventionally used in the art, and it is believed that a detailed individual designation of each such gate would be superfluous. Suffice it to give the basic logic functions performed by the circuit shown in Figure 7, which functions may be simplifiable and implementable by other (possibly more efficient~ circuits other than that shown in Figure 7. These functions, relating the solenoid drivers' outputs Zo~ Zl' Z2 and Z3 to the variables ~1333~Z
lo and 11 and ultimately to Ao~ Al, S0 and Sl, are o ( QlQ21 + QlQ210 + Qlloll)BT
(Qllo + QlQ211 ~ Q21011)BT
Z2 = (QlQ211 + QlQ210 + QlQ211 ~ Qlloll)

3 (Ql10 + QlQ211 + Q2loll)BT.
The variables Ql and Q2 in the above functions are internally developed within the circuit of Figure 7 and are, of course, dependent on the previous history of the engine and speed. Indeed, Ql and Q2 and their complements Ql and Q2 are outputs of the flip-flops 201 and 202. The inclusion of the variables B and T in the above logic functions expresses the override capability of these two inputs; both must be logic "1" for the activation of any cutout device to be possible. (Note that the B bit is only logic "0" if the brake is actuated while the car is moving).
The meaning of the above logic functions in terms of operational characteristics is summarized in the following table. The table gives the corresponding number of groups or pairs of cylinders cut out, given a certain combination of accelerator position and speedometer indication.
Since the present control logic provides the random mitiatron of the flip-flops 201 and 202 (Figure 7~,each time the engine is started anew, the groups of cylinders cut out are also random. This, as is obvious, provides for even distribution of the cylinders cut out over longer periods of time, such that normal wear is evenly distributed over all the cylinders.

~13334;~

.

Speed 0,0 0,1 1,0 1,1 Al \ ange: 3-10 10-30 30-70 70 Correspond ~ Accel erator Displacement ~
. _ , . .
0,0 0-.25" 3 2 3 3 ___ . l _ 0,1 .25-.~5 ~ 2 2 2 1,0 .75-1.75 0 1 2 1 ' ' '- . . _ . . . _, .
1,1 1.75-3.00'' _ _ 0 0 0 As an example, the table shows that with the spread between 0-10 kmph and the accelerator displacement between 0-0.25 inches (assuming a total displacement of 3 inches), three groups of cylinders are cut out, since the car is idling. ~or an eight cylinder engine, this means that six cylinders are cut out. For a four cylinder engine, it would mean that three cylinders are cut out. Of course, such table is not the only possible arrangement. Its basic purpose is to take account of the torque require-ments placed on the engine, and as such is dependent on the choice of the~designer within limits. For instance, one may always choose to operate more cylinders than is minimally required. It is also understood that other parameters may be sensed, e.g., vacuum, tachometers with transmis-sion, fuel flow, oil pressure and choke.

li333~2 SUPPI~ENTAR~ DISCLOS~RE
The Principal Disclosure provided a novel engine cylinder cutout system for internal combustion engines, e.g.,gasoline engines, or diesel engines, which may be operated either by fluids, e.g., pneumatic or hydraulic, or which may be operated mechanically. The system included a plurality of uncoupling devices for selectively coupling or uncoupling valve operators from respective driven members, the uncoupling devices being selectively operable for normal operation (enabling the normal cycle of operation of the valve operators), and for cutout operation (interrupting such normal cycle in any phase of its operation), the plurality of cutout devices being equal in number to the number of cylinders or valves in the engine. Shifting mechanism operated either mechanically or being solenoid controlled was provided for selectively operating the uncoupling devices to provide variation of valve operation from normal cycles (allowing the valves to be opened or closed as required), and cutout operation, in which selec-tive one or ones of the valve operators were uncoupled so that selected exhaust valves were open while associated selected intake valves were closed. Retentive control means were provided which were responsive to the status of vehicle operating parameters for randomly initiating activation thereof. In this way, one or more cyclinders in the engine were selectively cut out a substantially even average amount of time, so that engine wear was balanced.
The Principal Disclosure also provided a broad teaching of several variants of uncouplîng devices, several variants of mechanical or solenoid controls, and several variants of retentive control means.
The present invention, as taught both by the Principal Disclosure and by the present Supplementary Disclosure, now aims to provide an internal combustion engine control system having three essential segments therein, namely, the uncoupling devices or mechanisms of cylinder control, improved solenoid-controlled shifting mechanisms, and improved retentive 11333~Z
control means, i.e., information processing. The invention thus provides for the integrated actuation of these three essential segments with the i end result of allowing selectivity, either manual or automatic, in the functioning of the cylinders of an internal combustion engine. By the inven-tion now provided both by the Principal Disclosure and by the present Supple-mentary Disclosure, mechanisms are provided to effect control of cylinder valves through interruption of their normal actuation pulses by the con-trolled alteration of the function of normal pushrods. Ry the invention provided both by the Principal Disclosure and by the present Supplementary Disclosure, means are also provided for cylinder firing patterns to be altered to minimize vibration and to provide for substantially even cylinder use and wear while responding to sensor-monitored load conditions.
Internal combustion engines that operate on less than full cylin-der complement to achieve fuel economy have been under development since the beginning of the l900's. Their commercial implementation has been impractical due to the complexity and corresponding high costs of existing prior art systems, as well as unimpressive reliability records.
Objects of aspects of the present invention as now provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure are to provide improved shifting mech-anisms, to provide improved solenoid mechanism, uncoupling devices, and cylinder control mechanisms, and to provide improved retentive control means or information processing mechanisms which are simple in design, easy to manufacture, provide fast, reliable control of valve function and do not interfere with normal pushrod functions of reliable valve actuation (when so desired) and with normal rocker arm/engine head lubrication. Such mech-anisms provided herein by the Principal Disclosure and by the present Supplementary Disclosure are designed for use with standard internal com-bustion engines, involving only minor pushrod modification. Such mechanisms are designed to be fully compatible with any standard internal combustion engine regardless '~'3 ~ - SD 19 -~1333~2 of fuel used or number of cylinders. The principles involved in the mechanixms of aspects of this invention can be adapted to the valves directly for use with an overhead-cam type engine.
By a broad aspect of the invention now provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure, the uncoupling device for controlling the valve of the internal combustion engine of the engine cylinder cutout system comprises: (1) a casing; (2) a composite operating mechanism comprising an inner pushrod and outer tappet rod telescopically assembled together and slidably mounted within the casing; and (3) controlled means actuat-able for automatically (i) permitting the inner pushrod to slide with res-pect to the outer tappet rod so that the outer tappet rod is immovable with respect to the casing, and (ii) locking the inner pushrod to the outer tappet rod, thereby to cause the inner pushrod to move the outer tappet rod slidably with respect to the casing.
By a variant thereof, the inner pushrod includes a maior cylin-drical portion slidably disposed within a major hollow cylindrical portion - of the outer tappet rod.
By a variation thereof, the major hollow cylindrical portion includes a minor central projecting pin, slidably disposed within a minor central bore at one end of the outer tappet rod.
By another variation, one end of the outer tappet rod includes a plurality of bores extending longitudinally therethrough, and the inner pushrod includes a central bore extending longitudinally therethrough.
By another variant, the means (3) comprises: (a) a first semi-toroidal groove in the inner pushrod; (b) a plurality of discrete slits around the circumference of the outer tappet rod; (c) a plurality of balls disposed within the discrete slits; (d) a slidable member within the casing, the slidable member inrluding a second semi-toroidal groove on the inner face thereof; and (e) means for moving the slidable member (d) ~3334Z

between (1) a first position, where the second groove is ali~ned with the first groove, thereby to pennit the inner pushrod to slide with respect to the outer tappet rod, and (ii) a second position, where the second groove is not aligned with the first groove, thereby to lock the inner pushrod with respect to the outer tappet rod.
By a variation thereof, the slidable member comprises: a piston having a head portion and a rod portion, the second groove being disposed on the rod portion of the piston; and the moving means comprises: a pres-sure fluid in~ectable into selected associated pressure chambers within the casing for acting against selected surfaces of the head portion of the piston.
By another variation, the device includes a lower pressure chamber within the casing for filling with the pressure fluid for urging the lower face of the head of the piston upwardly.
By a further variation, the device includes an intermediate pressure chamber within the casing for filling withthe pressure fluid for ~ urging the upper face of the head of the piston downwardly.
By a still further variation, the device includes an upper pres-sure chamber within the casing for filling with the pressure fluid for urging the upper face of the rod of the piston downwardly.
By yet another variation, the piston rod includes a shoulder engageable with the casing to limit the extent of the lower movement of the piston.
By a still further variation, the casing includes an inner shoulder engageable with the upper face of the head of the piston to limit the extent of the upper movement of the piston.
By another variant, the inner pushrod includes: (a) an inner cylindrical rod; (b) an intermediate hollow cylindrical bushing; and (c) an outer hollow cylindrical slidable member, the outer member including ~13334Z

a circumferential encircling first groove around the outer face ~hereof.

By a variation thereof, the outer tappet rod includes: (a) a hollow cylindrical main portion, the main portion including a plurality of discrete encircling slits therearound; and (b) an outer upper projecting rod.
By yet another variation, the device includes a second slidable member disposed between the inner wall of the casing and the outer wall of the outer tappet rod, the second slidable member including a circumferen-tial encircling second groove around the inner face thereof.
By a further variation, the means (3) comprises: (d) a plurality of balls disposed within the discrete encircling slits; and (3) means for moving the slidable member between (i) a first position where the second groove is aligned with the first groove, (ii) a second position where the second groove is not aligned with the outer hollow cylindrical slidable member with the first groove thereon in its upper position, and (iii) a third position where the second groove is not aligned with the first groove when the outer hollow cylindrical slidable member with the first groove thereon is in its lower position.
By another variation, the moving means comprises a pressure fluid injectable into selected pressure chambers within the casing for acting against selected surfaces of respective such movable members.
By yet another variation, the hollow cylindrical main portion of the outer tappet rod includes a lower head portian.
By still another variation, the fluid pressure chambers include a lower pressure chamber for filling with the pressure fluid for urging the lower face of the lower head portion to move the member upwardly.
By a still further variation, the fluid pressure chambers include a lower intermediate chamber for filling with the pressure fluid for urging the upper face of the lower head portion to move the member 1~333~2 downwardly.
By a still further variation, the means (3) comprises: ~d) a plurality of balls disposed within the discrete encircling sl S ts; and (e) means for moving the slidable member between (i) a first posltion where the second groove is aligned with the first groove, (ii) a second position where the second groove is not aligned with the outer hollow cylindrical slidable member with the first groove thereon in its upper position, and (iii) a third position where the second groove is not aligned with the first groove when the outer hollow cylindrical slidable member with the first groove thereon is in its lower position, and the fluid pressure chambers include an upper intermediate chamber for filling with the pres-sure fluid for urging the lower face of the second slidable member upward-ly .
By another variation, the fluid pressure chambers include an upper chamber for filling ~ith the pressure fluid for urging the upper face of the second slidable member downwardly.
By yet a further variation, the casing includes an upper inner shoulder for restricting the upper movement of the second slidable member.
By a further variation, the casing includes a false floor betwe~en the lower intermediate chamber and the upper intermediate cham~er for simultaneously restricting lower movement of the second slidable member and upper movement of the head of the slidable member.
By another variant, the inner pushrod includes a main lower cylindrical portion and a minor upper central projection of lesser dia-meter than the lower cylindrical portion.
By a variation thereof, the outer tappet rod includes a main inner cylindrical portion and a hollow core within which the minor upper central projection is adapted to slide.
By a further variation, the outer tappet rod includes means to ~1333~2 restrict lower movement thereof.
By yet another variation, the inner pushrod includes a main lower cyliDdrical portion and a minor upper central projection of lesser diameter than the lower cylindrical portion, and the outer tappet rod includes a further main inner cylindrical portion and a hollow core within which the minor central projection of the pushrod is adapted to slide, and an outer slidable cylinder slidably disposed between the incer wall of the casing and the outer wall of the further main cylindrical portion.
By still another variation, the device includes cooperating shoulders on the outer tappet rod and the further cylindrical portion.
By a still further variation, the means (3) comprises: (e) means (i) for urging the slidable member downwardly to require the outer tappet rod to move in unison with the inner pushrod with respect to the casing, and (ii) for urging the slidable member upwardly to permit the inner pushrod to slide with respect to the outer tappet rod.
By a further variation, the means (3) comprises: (e~ means (i) for urging the slidable member downwardly to require the outer tappet rod to move in unison with the inner pushrod with respect to the casing, and (ii) for urging the slidable member upwardly to permit the inner pushrod to slide with respect to the outer tappet rod, and the means (e) includes a pressure chamber for filling with pressure fluid below the lower face of the base of the further cylindrical portion for urging the face upwardly, or above the upper face of the base of the further cylindrical portion for urging the face downwardly.
By yet another variant, the inner pushrod comprises a main lower cylindrical portion slidably disposed within the lower portion of the casing, the cylindrical portlon including an upper central extension rod;
the outer tappet rod comprises a main lower cylindrical portion slidably "` 11333~Z

disposed within the upper portion of the casing, a central lower well within wh~ch the upper extension rod is adapted to slide, and an upper pushrod engagement ball.
By a variatlon thereof, the means (3) comprises a lower chamber in the casing between the pushrod and the tappet rod and a means for filling the chamber with a pressure fluid so that, ~i) when the chamber is filled with fluid, reciprocation of the pushrod provides corresponding reciprocation of the tappet rod; and (ii) when the chamber is empty of fluid, reciprocation of the pushrod does not provide corresponding recip-rocation of the tappet rod.

~ y a further variation, the inner pushrod and the outer tappetare longitudinally bored therethrough for normal oil lubrication.
By still another variant, the casing includes a lower portion of a first internal diameter, and an upper portion of a second larger internal diameter.
By a variation thereof, the inner pushrod comprises a lower cylindrical portion adapted to slide reciprocatingly within the lower por-tion of the casing, a lower countersunk pushrod engagement face, and an - upper reduced diameter upstanding extension rod; and the outer tappet rod 2~ comprises an upper portion of larger diameter adapted to slide recipro-catingly within the upper portion of the casing, a lower portion of lesser diameter adapted to slide reciprocatingly within the lower portion of the casing, a lower well within which the extension rod is adapted to slide reciprocatingly, and an upper pushrod engagement ball.
By another variation thereof, the upper portion of the outer tappet rod is adapted to abut on an inner shoulder on the casing to restrict lower movement thereof.
By yet another variation, the inner pushrod and the outer tappet rod are longitudinally bored therethrough for normal oil lubrication.

` ~1333~2 By a further variation, the casing includes an upper chamber, fed with pressure fluid through a palr of unimpeded flow conduits, and a lower chamber, fed with pressure fluid through a positive controlled flow conduit, whereby (i) when the lower chamber is filled with pressure fluid, reciprocation of the inner pushrod provides a corresponding reciprocation of the outer tappet rod; (ii) when the lower chamber is emptied of the pressure fluid and when the upper chamber is emptied of pressure fluld, reciprocation of the outer tappet rod does not provide a corresponding reciprocation ~f the outer tappet rod, with the outer tappet rod at its lower limit position; and (iii) when the lower chamber is emptied of the pressure fluid, reciprocation of the outer tappet rod does not provide a corresponding reciprocation of the outer tappet rod, with the outer tappet rod at a slightly elevated position to provide a slight bleed-off of the exhaust valve.
By yet another variation, the device includes an additional unimpeded flow conduit from the upper portion of the lower pressure chamber to provide emergency pressure relief to the lower chamber.

By another variant, the device includes inner and outer pushrods, in which the inner pushrod includes a cylindrical portion slidably disposed with its base within the casing and within a coextensive major bore within the outer tappet rod.
By a variant thereof, the inner pushrod includes a control projecting pin slidably disposed within a minor central bore communicating with the major bore within the outer tappet rod.
By another variant thereof, the device includes a first pressure fluid inlet port to an upper portion of a first internal fluid pressure chamber for operation of the outer pushrod by the reciprocation of the inner pushrod.

11333~2 By yet another variant thereof, the device includes a pressure fluid inlet port in the outer pushrod leading to a second internal fluid pressure chamber.
By a still further variant thereof, the device includes a second pressure fluid inlet selectively operable as a free-flow port and as a one way inlet port, leading to a lower portion of a first internal fluid pressure chamber.

By still another variant, the device comprises: tl) a mounting bushing; (2) an inner and an outer coaxially assembled tappet rod assem-bly slidably mounted within the mounting bushing; and (3) tappet rod length adjusting means operatively associated with the tappet rod assembly and actuatable to change the tappet rod length between a first preselected long length and a second preselected short length.
By a variation thereof, the tappet rod assembly includes: an outer cylindrical member, the lower end of which is connected to a lower tappet rod, with the outer cylindrical member being centrally bored; and an inner tappet rod slidably mounted within the central bore, the inner tappet rod including a tappet-engaging projection ball thereon.
By another variation, the tappet rod length ad~usting mesns - SD 26a -11333 ~Z

compri~se~: an engagement member at the end of the outer cylindrical member, the engagement member including two different height shoulders connected by a spiral ramp so that the shoulders are 180 apart; and an enlarged engagement member along the inner tappet rod, the enlarged engage-ment member including two different height shoulders connected by a spiral ramp so that the shoulders are 180 apart.
By stiil another variation, the engagement means on the inner cylinder comprises an integral enlargement.
By yet another variation, the engagement means on the inner cylinder comprises a sloped end thereof.
By another variation, the device includes directly driven means to rotate only the inner tappet rod and its engagement member through 180 thereby to fix the tappet rod at an upper position independent of the operation of the pushrod.
By a variation thereof, the means includes a bushing having a polygonal inner face slidably engageable with a congruent polygonal outer face of the outer enlargement and operating means to rotate the bushing.
By a further variation thereof, the operating means comprises a rack and pinion device.
By yet another variation thereof, the operating means comprises an hydraulic ramt By another aspect of t~is invention as now provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure, the shifting mechanism comprises solenoid control mechanism comprising: (a) a block; ~b~ a central longitudinal control well therein; (c) a first and a second transverse, fluid conduiting valved bores therein each being provided with a fluid flow conduit; (d) a central, transverse fluid conducting bore therein, provided with open conduit con-nections to the transverse valved bores and valved conduit connections to the valved bores, and connecting to a main supply conduit; and (e) actuated " ~333~Z

control means disposed in the control well for (i) providing fluid connec-tion between the first valved conduit, the open conduit connection, the central bore and the main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connec-tion between the open conduit connection and the second valved conduit;
(ii) providing fluid connection between the second valved conduit, the open conduit connection, the central bore and the main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connection between the open conduit connection and the first valved conduit; and (iii) providing fluid connection between the first valved conduit, the open conduit connection,the central bore and the main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connection between the open conduit connection and the second valved conduit and providing fluid con-nection between the second valved conduit, the open conduit connection, the central bore and the main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connec-tion between the open conduit connection and the first valved conduit.
By a variant thereof, the actuated control means comprises an electromagnetically actuated solenoid having a body portion with an access - gap and a blocking portion thereon, By another variant, the first valved conduit is connected to the exhaust mechanism.
By another variant, the second valved conduit is connected to the intake mechanism.
By a further variant, the first valved conduit is connected to the exhaust mechanism,the second valved conduit is connected to the intake mechanism and the exhaust conduit is at a lower level than the intake con-duit.
By yet another variant, the valved bores are each controlled by spring actuated ball check valves.
By a still further variant, the actuated control means is posi-tively actuated to provide flow from main supply conduit at a sufficient 11333~Z

pressure to flow through valved bores and then through the ~luid flow con-duit associated with each valved bore.
By another variantJ the actuated control means is positively actuated control means is positively actuated to provide fluid flow through the open conduit connection only to the first valved bore, allowing fluid exhaust from the exhaust mechanism to relieve fluid pressure and allowing normal exhaust valve function.
By a further variant, the actuated control means is positively actuated to provide fluid flow through the open conduit connection to both the first valved bore and the second valved bore, thereby closing the intake valve while allowing the exhaust valve to function normally.
By still another variant, the actuated control means is positive-ly actuated to provide fluid flow through the open conduit connection only to the second valved bore, thereby disconnecting the intake valve mechanism.
sy another variant of the invention, the shifting mechanism comprises (a) an open;:tubular casing; (b) a cont-rol body slidably disposed within the tubular casing, the control body including a head portion, adopted to abut with a rlm in the tubular casing, thereby to limit movement of the control body in one direction; (c) a lesser diameter tubular rod connected between the control body and a second captive slidable plug fully disposed within the tubular casing; and two pairs of ports adopted to lead hydraulic fluid into and out of the interior of the tubular casing.
sy a variant thereof, the mechanism includes means for applying an activating force to the head portion of the control body.
By a variation thereof, the actuating force is derived from a soloen id, a permanent magnet, an electromagnet, a spring, hydraulic means, or pneumatic means.

` ~1333~
sy yet another variant thereof, the mechanism in-cludes means adopted to act upon an exposed face of the captive plug selectively to act against the means for apply-ing the activating force.
By a variation thereof, that means is a return spring.
By another variant thereof the ports are so disposed that the control body is adopted to close off a pair of diametrically opposed ports while the captive plug is adopted to open the other pair of diametrically opposed ports.
By a variation thereof, the mechanism includes spacing grooves or gates to adjust the proper distance between the control body and the captive plug.
In the drawings accompanying the present Supplementary Disclos-ure~
Figures 8A, 8B and ~C show one variant of a cylinder control mechanism of an embodiment of the invention provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure for an intake valve;
Figures 9A, 9B, 9C and 9D show one variant of a cylinder control mechanism of an embodiment of the invention provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure for an exhaust valve.
Figures lOA and lOB show another variant of a cylinder control mechanism of an embodiment of the invent;on provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure for an intake valve;
Figures llA, llB and llC show yet another variant of a cylinder control mechanism of an embodiment of the invention provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure for an exhaust valve;
Figures 12A, 12B, 12C and 12D show other variants of a cylinder control mechanism of an embodiment of the invention provided by ~he present Supplementary Disclosure, `' il333~Z

in which Figures 12A, 12B and 12D are for an exhaust valve, and in which Figure 12C is for an intake valve;
Figures 13A and 13B show in full view and in partial view, re-spectively, another variant of a cylinder control mechanism of an embodi-ment of the invention provided by the present Supplementary Disclosure for an intake valve.
Figures 14A and 14B show in full view and in partial view, re-spectively, another variant of a cylinder control mechanism of an embodi-ment of the invention provided ~y the present Supplementary Disclosure for an exhaust valve;
Figure 15 is a top view, partly in section, of the body of a solenoid control mechanism forrning part of another variant of this inven-tion;
Figure 16 is a front view of the solenoid control mechanism of Figure 15;
Figure 17 is a rear view of the solenoid control mechanism of Figure 15;
Figure 18 is a side view of the solenoid control mechanism of Figure 15;
Figure 19 is a side view of the a-mature mechamism forming a part of the solenoid control mechanism of Figure 15;
Figure 20 is a schematic longitudinal section through another variant of a control mechanism forming part of another variant of this invention.
As seen in Figures 8A, 8B and 8C, the cylinder control mechanism 120 for an intake valve comprises a hollow cylindrical casing 130 having a greater diameter lower end 131. Disposed within casing 130 is a modified inner pushrod 121 and modified outer tappet rod 122. Inner pushrod 121 is ~ -SD 30 a -`` 11~3~;~

modified by the provision of an encircling semi-toroidal ball race ~- SD 30 aa -.

~13334Z

groove 132 within which a plurality of balls 133 are freely rotatably placed. Inner pushrod 121 al80 includes a smaller diameter upper cylin-- SD 30 b -1~3334~
d~ical pin 134 projecting therefrom. Outer tappet rod 122 includes 8 lower hollow cylindrical portlon 125 telescopically slidably mounted with respect to inner pushrod ]21. Portion 125 of outer tappet rod 122 includes a discontinuous circumferential encircling slit 136 therein of slightly greater width than the diameter of the balls 133. The number of - discontinuities in slit 136 is equal to the number of balls 133. The upper part of outer tappet rod 122 is also provided with a central well 137, within which pin 134 is adapted to oscillate or reciprocate. A
plurality of longitudinally extending vent bores 138 is also provided in the upper portion of outer tappet rod 122. A dead space 148 is provided between an end face of inner pushrod 121 and the base of portion 125 of outer tappet rod 122. Outer tappet rod 122 is provided with a conventional pushrod engagement ball 122a.
Slidab~y disposed within casing 130 between the inner wall of the casing 130 and the outer wall of the lower portion 125 of outer tappet rod 122 is a piston 139 including a rod end 140 and a head end 141. The piston 139 thus provides three discrete chambers within casing 130, namely lower chamber 142, intermediate chamber 143 and upper chamber 144, having conduits 145, 146, 147 therefrom respectively, to allow inflow or outflow of a fluid under pressure, e.g~, a hydraulic fluid or a pneumatic fluid.
Rod 139 is provided with an interior encircling semi-toroidal ball race groove 149 therein.
In operation, in the configuration shown in Figure 8A, with fluid under pressure in chambers 143 and 144 and with chamber 142 evacu-ated, reciprocating movement of the inner pushrod 121 (e.g., by operator 13 and cam 17 as described for Figure 2) results in corresponding recip-rocating movement of outer tappet rod 122, since the balls 133 are cap-tured in the race between the grooves 132 and the slits 136. In this con-figuration, normal valve operation is provided.

1~333~Z
In the configuration shown in Figures 8B and 8C, with fluid under pressure in chamber 142, and with chambers 143 and 144 evacuated, piston 139 is pushed upwardly so that groove 149 is aligned with slits 136~ Thus, as inner pushrod 121 is pushed upwardly, balls 133 escape to the race between slits 136 and groove 149. This permits inner pushrod 121 to oscillate within well 137 withou$ a corresponding oscillation of outer tappet rod 122. In this configuration, then, cutout valve operation is provided with the valve being "substantially" closed. By being substan-tially closed, i.e., slightly open, the intake valve can "breathe" slight-ly and thereby be maintained slightly cooler. This would increase opera-tional life.
Thus, the mechanism shown in these Figures is a device designed such that, when activated through a control mechanism, the normal recip-rocating function of a~n intake~ valve is interrupted, with the bottom half of the pushrod following the contour of the cam shaft through the periodic pulses transmitted through the hydraulic valve lifter. Thus, - this embodiment shows a mechanism designed to alter the operation of a pushrod for an intake valve such that the cam-induced motion can be selec-tively disconnected from its normal valve train operation, in such a manner as to maintain the valve at its end-of-pushrod-stroke position with the valve substantially closed regardless of pushrod motion.
The small size of the slits compared to the size of the balls is to ensure fast, secure deactivation with a minimum of wear on the parts.
Drilling of the push and tappet rods also ensures that the secondary role of the normal rod is maintained, namely, that of lubrication. Since all the parts are cylindrical (except, of course, for the balls), the pushrod and tappet rod are free to rotate, in the normal pushrod manner, to dis-tribute wear evenly and to compensate for pushrod deformation which other-wise tends to curve the rod with repeated impact. This cylindrical design s - SD 32 -~1333~Z

allows all parts to rotate about the pushrod axis while not interfering with the illtended valve actuation process.
As seen in Figures 9A, 9B, 9C and 9D, the cylinder control mechanism 220 for an exhaust valve includes a casing 230 within which are 2 slidably mounted inner pushrod 221 and outer tappet rod 222. Inner push-rod 221 is a normal pushrod merely modified to have a flat head 255, and has its conventional lubrication bore 237 longitudinally therethrough.
Concentrically disposed around inner pushrod 221 is a cylindrical housing 251 to support inner pushrod 221 while allowing inner pushrod 221 to oscillate therewithin, and yet permitting relative rotation thereof.
Outer tappet rod 222 includes a lower hollow cylindrical portion 235 which is provided with a plurality of discontinuous slits 236. Dis-posed between the inner wall of portion 235 and the outer wall of housing 251 is a piston 239 including a rod portion 240 and a head portion 241.
On the outer circumferential wall of the rod portion 240 is an encircling - semi-toroidal ball race groove 232, wîthin which a plurality of balls 233 is freely rotatably positioned. The width of slits 236 is slightly greater than the diameter of the balls 233, and the number of discontinu-ous slits 236 is equal to the number of balls 233. Mounted in the casing~
20 230 between the inner wall thereof and the outer wall of portion 235 is a governing cylinder 252, whose inner wall is provided with a cylindrical groove 249. Outer tappet rod 222 is also provided with a normal pushrod engagement ball 222a.
The placement of the various components within casing 230 pro-vides a number of discrete fluid chambers therein, namely, lower chamber 242, lower intermediate chamber 243, upper intermediate chamber 253 and upper chamber 244, provided with valved pressure fluid conduits 245, 246, 254 and 247, respectively.
In operation, as shown in Figure 9A, inner pushrod 221 contained , ~

~333~Z
within cylinder housing 251 is caused to oscillate by cam 17 (see Figure 2) and forces outer tappet rod 222 to its top-of-stroke position, opening valve 15 through activation of the rocker arm 14. Fluid under pressure is provided in chambers 242 and 244, while chambers 243 and 253 are evacuated.
Thus, balls 233 are allowed to run freely along the ball race provided by groove 232 and cylindrical guide 249. This then provides normal valve operation.
As seen in Figure 9B, fluid under pressure is admitted to chamber 244 via conduit 247, which forces governi~g cylinder 239 downward. This permits balls 233 to run along groove 232 and guide 249, i.e., releasing the balls 233 from their locked position taS shown in Figures 9C and 9D).
Fluid under pressure is forced to leave chamber 253 via conduit 246.
Fluid is then injected into chamber 242 via conduit 245, raising piston head 243/piston rod 240 and evacuating chamber 251 via port 246 (as shown in Figure 9A).
As seen in Figures 9C and 9D, fluid pressurization of chamber - 243 through conduit 246 forces head end 241 downwardly and evacuates chamber 242 via conduit 245, and with rod end 240 slîding downwardly with respect to casing 251. Then, hydraulic or electronic sequencing by fluid pressurization of chamber 253 via conduit 254 pushes governing piston 252 upward, and consequently cylindrical guide 249 is also pushed upward. Chamber 244 is also evacuated via conduit 247. This, then, eliminates the alternate guide race for the balls 233 which are therefore forced into the race defined by the groove 232 and the slits 236. Inner pushrod 221 is kept following the motion of the cam 17 by reaction of the spring 16 (see Figure 2) but the valve is kept at its end-of-stroke posi-tion.
Thus, the embodiment shown in Figures 9A - 9D provides a mechanism designed to maintain a valve in an open position when activated , ..

11333L~Z

or to allow system functionlng as a normal pushrad as desired. Thus, the embodiment shown here provides a mechanism designed to alter the operation of tlle pushrod for an exhaust valve such that the rod effectively is main-tained at the top-of-stroke position, maintaining the valve open. By lengthening the height of the pushrod assembly, the rod is effectively maintained at its top-of-stroke position, with the valve remaining propped open with no further energy expenditure. Since this inner pushrod/outer tappet rod assembly is drilled for lubrication, the system maintains normal rocker arm lubrication.

The embodiment shown in Figures 10A and lOB provides a simple form of cylinder control mechanism 520 for an intake valve. The mechanism 520 includes a casing 530 within which are indepdently slidably mounted a modified inner pushrod 521 and a modified outer tappet rod. The lower end of inner pushrod 521 is operatively engaged by a valve lifter mechanism 513, and the upper end is provided by a reduced diameter extension 525.
The modified outer tappet rod includes a restraining shoulder 523 and an internal bore 524. Extension 525 is adapted to slide within bore 524.
In its at-rest position, there is a dead head 540 within bore 524 between the end of the bore 524 and the end of the extension 525, the length of the dead head 540 being slightly longer than the stroke of the extension rod 525. Outer tappet rod 522 is provided with a normal pushrod engagement ball 522a.
A fluid pressure chamber 531 provided with conduit 532 is formed between the end of the outer tappet rod 522 and the larger diameter end of inner pushrod 521.
In operation, in the configuration shown in Figure 10A, chamber 531 is evacuated. Thus, oscillation of the inner pushrod 521 merely results in oscillation of the extension 525 within bore 540, and so there is no oscillation of the outer tappet rod 522. Thus, the tappet 14 is not , - SD 35 -1~333~-~2 actuated and the valve 15 remains substantlally closed. The valve is in its inactive position. By being substantially closed, i.e., slightly open, the intake valve can "breathe" slightly and thereby be maintained slightly cooled. This would increase operational life.
In normal operation as shown in Figure 10B, chamber 531 is filled with fluid under pressure via conduit 532. Oscîllation of the inner pushrod 521 is transmitted to the outer tappet rod 522 via the fluid under pressure acting as a bridge and produces normal valve operation.
This embodiment thus shows a mechanism designed to maintain a valve in its substantially closed position, isolated from the normal push-rod induced reciprocation when activated, or to allow the pushrod/rocker arm assembly to function in a normal manner valve-activating manner when so desired. One-way valves and springs ensure that the chamber cavity is maintained at its fullest level. Lubrication is again maintained. In addition, both inner and outer pushrod and tappet rod sections are free to rotate, in order to distribute wear on the sections within the housing, which remains fixed with respect to the engine head. Thus, this embodi-ment shows a mechanism designed to alter the operation of a pushrod for an intake valve such that the cam-induced motion can be selectively discon-nected from its normal valve train operation, in such a manner as to main-tain the valve at its end-of-pushrod-stroke position with the valve substan-tially closed regardless of pushrod motion.
As seen in ~igures llA, llB and llC, the cylinder control mechanism 620 for an exhaust valve includes a casing 630, a modified inner pushrod 621 and a modified outer tappet rod 622. Modified inner pushrod 621 includes a reduced diameter extension 625 projecting therefrom. Modi fied outer tappet rod 622 includes a central bore 650 within which exten-sion 625 is adapted to slide, and a reduced diameter extension 627 pro-viding an abutment shoulder 628. Between the outer tappet rod 622 and 11333 ~

the casing 630 is a piston 639 including a rod portion 640 and a head portion 641. The elements are disposed within casing 630 so as to provlde a pressure chamber 651 lncluding a pair of conduits 652, 653 thereto. Outer tappet rod 622 is provided with a normal pushrod engagement ball 622a.
In normal operation as shown in Figure llA, with lower portion of chamber 651 evacuated through conduit 653, but with the upper portion of chamber 651 filled with fluid under pressure through conduit 652, piston 639 is pushed down with fluid under pressure on the inside face of head 641. Thus, when the inner pushrod 621 oscillates, the outer tappet rod 622 similarly oscillates since it is urged upwardly by direct contact with cooperating shoulders on the respective rods. The rods are urged downwardly by the valve spring 16 (see Figure 2~.
In the locked position as shown in Figures llB and llC, the lower chamber 651 is filled with fluid under pressure through conduit 653 simultaneously removing fluid through, and sealing off, conduit 652. Thus, inner pushrod 621 is free to oscillate within bore 650, both in the up-stroke (as shown in Figure llB) and in the down-stroke (as shown in Figure llC).
Deactivation of the system, to allow resumption of normal push-2Q rod function can be accelerated by the addition of a second fluid port(not shown) placed so as to provide pressure to be placed so as to provide force to lower the piston, allowing inner and outer rod sections 621/622 to return to their normal pattern of contact.
Thus, in this embodiment, a mechanism is shown which is designed to maintain a valve in an open position, isolated from the normal pushrod reciprocation, when activated, or to allow the pushrod to function nor-mally when so desired. Thus, the embodiment shown here provides a mechanism designed to alter the operation of the pushrod for an exhaust valve such that the rod effectively is maintained at any desired position, e.g., at the top-of-stroke position, 1'1~33~2 maintaining the valve open. By lengthening the height of the pushrod assembly, the rod is effectively maintained at its top-of-stroke position, with the valve remaining propped open with no further energy expenditure.
Since this inner pushrod/outer tappet rod assembly is drilled for lubrica-tion, the system maintains normal rocker arm lubrication.
As seen in Figures 12A and 12B, the exhaust valve control mechanism 720 comprises a hollow cylindrical casing 730 having a greater diameter upper end 731. Disposed within casing 730 is a modified pushrod 721 and a modified tappet rod 722. Pushrod 721 is modified with the lower end having a pushrod engagement countersunk circular face 714 into which a normal pushrod fits after being cut to size. The bottom part of the pushrod 721 consists of a tight-fitting piston head 715, with the top portion comprising a reduced-diameter extension rod 716 fitting snugly and slidably inside a receptor well 724 in the bottom part of tappet rod 722. Elements 715, 715 and 722 of the pushrod 721 are centrally drilled at 735 for normal oil lubrication provision. The tappet rod 722 slides reciprocatingly inside the upper portion 731 of cylindrical casing 720.
The upper face 728 comprises a normal pushrod engagement ball 729 for rocker arm contact~activation. The lower face 732 of the upper portion 733 of tappet rod 722 rests,at bottom of its stroke, on lip 734 of the cylindrical casing 730 where enlarged upper end 731 begins. The tappet rod terminates in protrusion 726 which fits slidingly into main bore 736 of casing 730. Receptive well 724 extends far enough to allow full motion of pushrod extension rod 716 through any phase of operation.
Various conduits are provided in cylindrical casing to be con-nected to pressure-fluid carrying conduits (not shown). Thus, there are two upper apertures, namely upper left hand unimpeded flow conduit 752 connected between lip 734 and upper hydraulic chamber 750; lower left hand conduit 754 connected to lower chamber 751 of casing 730; upper , ~1333~Z

right hand unimpeded flow conduit 753 connected to upper hydraulic chamber 750; and lower right hand conduit 755 connected to the upper portion of bore 734.
In normal operation, the upper hydraulic chamber 750 (see Figure 12B) is allowed both to fill with fluid and to empty of fluid through unimpeded flow through conduits 752 and 753. At the same time, fluid is trapped in chamber 751 through impeded fluid flow from conduit 754, creating a hydraulic extension/bridge for the cam-induced impulses and producing normal valve actuation. Conduit 755 is unregulated and provides an emergency relief valve to guard against overextension of the pushrod and resulting damage to valves, rocker arms, etc.

When deactivated, normal fluid flow is permitted through conduit 753, while such flow is blocked through conduit 752. This creates a hydraulic jack which does not allow the rocker arm assembly to return to its neutral position, leaving it only slightly open such that the normal, uninterrupted piston action would not damage the valves. At the same time, pressure is relieved from chamber 751 by opening conduit 754. In this way, tappet rod 722 is held stationary through pressure in the bottom section of chamber 750, while phshrod 721 reciprocates freely inside chamber 751, with reduced diameter extension rod 716 sliding oscillatingly and normally inside receptor well 724. Again, conduit 755 is a relief valve to prevent valve damage.
Reactivation occurs through de-pressurization of chamber 750 through conduit 752 and re-pressurization of chamber 751 through the allow-ing only of inlet fluid through conduit 754. All of these changes are preferably solenoid-induced, but may satisfactorily be mechanically con-trolled.

. .
It shoul~ be noted that relief conduit 755 can be run verticel]y instead of horizontally. In this case, its access to the interior of 11333L~Z

casing 730 by means of a semi-circular groove leading from chamber 750 with no loss oE function.
Thus, the embodi~.ent shown here provides a mechanism I designed to alter the operation of the pushrod for an exhaust valve such that the rod effectively is malntained at any desired portion, e.g., at the top-of-stroke positlon, maintaining the valve open. By lengthening the height of the pushrod assembly, the rod is effectively maintained at its top-of-stroke position, with the valve remaining propped open with no further energy expenditure. Since this inner pushrod/outer tappet rod assembly is drilled for lubrication, the system maintains normal rocker arm lubrication.
As seen in Figure 12D, the exhaust valve control mechanism 775 comprises a hollow cylindrical casing 776 having a greater diameter upper end 777. Disposed within casing 776 is a modified pushrod 778 and a modified tappet rod 779. Pushrod 778 has its lower end 778a which engages with the normal hydraulic valve lifter (not shown~. The bottom portion of the pushrod 778 acts like a tight-fitting piston head 780a sliding within core 780 with the top of pushrod portion 778 comprising a reduced-diameter extension rod 781 fitting snuggly and slidably inside a receptor well 782 ln the tappet rod 779. Tappet rod 779 has a ma~or lower bo~e 782 coextensive with core 780. Elements 778 and 779 are centrally drilled at 783 for normal oil lubrication provision. The tappet rod 779 slides reciprocatingly inside the upper portion 777 of cylindrical casing 776. The upper face 783 comprises a normal pushrod engagement ball 784 for rocker arm contact/activation. The tappet rod 779 terminates in chamber 785 which abuts chamber 786 in casing 776. Receptive well 782 extends ; far enough to allow full motion of pushrod extension rod 781 ~33~2 through any phase of operation. The lower portion of tappet rod 779 is provided with a thorough bore 787 to the annular chamber 788 within casing 776. A partial circumferential channel 789 is provi~ed in tappet rod 779 for a purpose to be described.
Apertures are provided in cylindrical casing 776 to be connected to pressure-fluid carrying conduits (not shown). Thus, there is an upper aperture 790 provided with conduit 791, and lower aperture 792 provided with conduit 793.
In operation in its activated state, with fluid in chamber 788, upward movement of pushrod 778 first seals aligned ports 790 and 787. This provides a hydraulic ex-tension/bridge between pushrod 778 and tappet rod 779. This in turn, causes upward movement of tappet rod 779. This upward movement allows hydraulic ~luld to enter chamber 78~ via free_flow port 792 and conduit 793. Now, at the bottom of ,the stro~e, hydraulic fluid in chamber 788 is permitted to exit via free-flow part 792 and conduit 793.
A modification of the operation can enable the exhaust valve to be maintained in its partially-opened state.
The modification involves operating port 792 and conduit 793 in a one-way check-value fashion, allowing hydraulic fluid only to enter chamber 788. In such event, hydraulic fluid trapped in chamber 788 will maintain tappet rod 779 in a selected upper orientation. Such orientation is at the time when p~rts 790 and 787 are aligned. This permits the correct amount of hydraulic fluid to be disposed in front of the pushrod 778.

- SD 40 a -~1333~Z

Thus, the embodiment shown here provldeg a mechanism designed to alter the operation of the pushrod ~or an exhaust v81ve such that the rod effectively is maintained in any desired position, maintaining the valve open. By lengthening the height of the pushrod assembly, the rod is effectively maintained at its top-of-stroke position, with the valve remaining propped open with no further energy expendlture. Since this inner pushrod/outer tappet rod assembly is drilled for lubrication, the system maintalns normal rocker arm lubrication Figure 12C shows a companion intake control valve mechanism to the exhaust valve control mechanism in Figures 12A and 12B. The intake valve control mechanism includes a simple hollow cylindrical casing 830.
Within casing 830 is slidably disposed a modified pushrod 831 and a modi-fied tappet rod 822. Modified pushrod 831 is provided with lower extension means (not shown) for engagement with, and operation by, a normal pushrod (not shown), and with an upper extension lesser-diameter rod 816 fitting snugly and slidably inside a receptor well 833 in the bottom part of modi-fied tappet rod 822. Elements 831, 816 and 822 are drilled at 835 for normal oil lubrication provision. The modified tappet rod 822 slides reciprocatingly inside the upper portion of the hollow cylindrical casing 830. The upper face 828 of modified tappet rod 822 is provided with a normal pushrod-engagement ball 829 for normal rocker arm contact/activation.
The lower portion of cylindrical casing is provided with a lower chamber 851, adapted to be fed with fluid under pressure through controlled conduit 854.
In normal intake valve operation, chamber 851 is filled with - fluid under pressure through conduit 85~. This creates a hydraulic extension/bridge for the ca~-induced impulses to pushrod 831 and provides - SD 40 b -o ~ 33-~2 normal valve actuation, i.e., reciprocation of pushrod 831 causes a corres-ponding reciprocation of tappet rod 832 with a corresponding operation of the rocker arm through ball ~29.
When deactivated, fluid under pressure is drained from chamber ~51 through conduit 854. This allows pushrod 831 to reciprocate with its extension rod 816 sliding within well 833, without any corresponding reciprocation of tappet rod 832. ~e intake valve is thus maintained "substantially" closed. By being substantially closed, i.e., slightly open, the intake valve can "breathe" slightly and thereby be maintained slightly cooler. This would increase operational life.
Re-activation occurs through re-pressurization of chamber 851.
Thus, this embodiment sllows a mechanism designed to alter the operation of a pushrod for an intake valve such that the cam-induced motion can be selectively disconnected from its normal valve train opera-tion, in such a manner as to maintain the valve at its end-of-pushrod-stroke position with the valve substantially closed regardless of pushrod motion.
`As seen in Figures 13A and 13B, a cylinder control mechanism 320 for an intake valve is provided including an inner pushrod 321, an outer tappet rod 322~ an hydraulic valve lifter 313, a rocker or tappet arm 314 and a valve spring 316. Outer tappet rod 322 is modified by the provision of an upper bi-level engagement member 330 including a lower engagement shoulder 331 and an upper engagement shoulder 332. Engagement member 330 is of a cross-se~tional shape (e.g., hexagonal) allowing it to be held non-rotatably but slidably witllin guide element 333 (of similar cross-section). Guide element 333 is positively rotatable by means of a worm gear assembly 334 secured tG the cngine block. Surrounding the outer tappet rod 322 is a hollow control cylinder 340 provided with a bottom floor 341 upon which the lower end 335 o~ the outer tappet rod 322 rests.

33'~2 The lower end 342 of c~ntrol cyl;nder 340 is secured to the upper end of the inner pushrod 321. The upper end of the control cylinder 340 is pro-vided with an upper engagement member 343 having a lower engagement shoul-der 345 and an upper engagement shoulder 344. Control cylinder 340 is slidably and rotatàbly mounted within control bushing 346 whose outer sur-face 349 is within aperture 348 in the engine block. In order to maintain the modified unit 320 in its "at-rest" position, a coil spring 351 is dis-posed between ring 352 on pushrod 321 and retainer 353 secured to the engine block. Pushrod 321/tappet rod 322 are longitudinally drilled at 337 for normal oil lubrication function.
In use, in the configuration shown in Figure 13A, with faces 331/345 and 332/344 in engagement, the inner pushrod 321/outer tappet rod 322 act as a normal rod. Thus, oscillation of the inner pushrod 321 by the hydraulic valve lifter 313 causes similar oscillation of the outer tappet rod 322~ causing alternate opening and closing of the valve (15 -see Figure 2).
Rotation of the guide element 333 by worm gear assembly 343 through 180 degrees (see Figures 13B) causes faces 331/346 to be engaged only a~ top of the stroke of outer tappet rod 322. At other times, inner pushrod 321 rests on the lip of control cylinder 333. This realignment causes inner pushrod 321/outer tappet rod 322 to become a short rod, thereby maintaining intake valve 15 (see Figure 2) substantially closed at all times. By being substantially closed, i.e., slightly open, the intake valve can "breathe" slightly and thereby be maintained slightly cooler. This would increase operational life.
Rotation of guide member 333 through 180 degrees again by worm gear assembly 343 causes engagement member 330 to rotate again and have faces 331/345 and 332/344 in engagement. This brings the inner pushrod 321/outer tappet rod 322 back to its original normal operation as shown , ....
~ SD 42 -` 11333~Z

in Figure 13A.
As seen in Figures 14A and 14B, the cylinder control mechanism 420 for an exhaust valve includes an inner pushrod 421 and an outer tappet rod 422, as well as conventional valve lifter mechanism 413, and tappet rod 424. The valve and valve springs are not shown herein, but are shown as 15 and 16 in Figure 2.
The outer tappet rod 422 is modified by lncluding an operator member 430 thereon, of a shape which can be gripped, e,g., hexagonal or octagonal, which is secured for slidable movement but fixed against rota-tion within control element 433, rotatably mounted by worm gear mechanism 434 to the engine block. Operator member 430 includes upper engagement face 460 and lower engagement face 461.
Modified outer tappet rod 422 is freely rotatably mounted within the elongated tubular bushing 440, so that the lower end 435 thereof abuts the upper end 436 of the pushrod 421. Bushing 440 passes through bore 448 in engine block member 449 and rests with its cylindrical protuberance 456 on that portion of the engine block. The upper end-of bushing 440 is provided with upper engagement surface 463 and lower engagement surface 464.
Inner pushrod 421/outer tappet rod 422 i5 maintained in its fixed relation to bushing 440 by means of coil spring 451 between retainers 452 on pushrod 421 and 453 on bushing 440. ~ushrod 421/tappet rod 422 are longitudinally drilled at 437 for normal oil lubrication function.
In use, in the configuration shown in Figure 14A, surfaces 461/464 and 460/463 are~in engagement. Consequently, the inner pushrod 421/outer tappet rod 422 combination act as a normal rod, and oscillation of the rod 421 by the cam 17 (see Figure 2) causes opening and closing of the valve 15 (see Figure 2). The rod 421 returns to its "at-rest" posi-tion by the action of the valve spr;ng 16 (see Figure 2).

3~;~

Rotation of the control member 433 by the worm Bear mechanlsm - 434 through 180D causes operator member 430 to be rotated through 180 and moved upwardly. Surfaces 461/464 and 460/463 are only in engagement at the top-of-stroke. Thus, as shown in Figure 14B, a "long" rod 421/422 is provided whereby the valve 15 is always open. In this configuration, the pushrod 421 returns to its "at-rest" position by thè action of spring 451.
As noted hereinbefore, both in the Principal Disclosure and in the present Supplementary Disclosure, an essential element of the engine cylinder cutout system is the shifting mechanism which can be either mechanically operated or may be solenoid controlled. By the present inven-tion as now taught by the present Supplementary Disclosure, an improved solenoid control mechanism is also provided. Thus, a single coil solenoid mechanism is now provided ~hich allows control of the modified mechanisms for both the intake valves and the exhaust valves in a safe and ordered manner through the magnetically-induced motion of a single armature.
The importance of sequencing the engagement and disengagement of the modified mechanisms is due to the fact that partial charges can occur.
There is also the possibility of combustion occurring with no provision for gas release. The intake valve must first then be removed from its normal operative cycles followed by the removal of the exhaust valves from its normal operative cycles. ~?hen the reverse is desired, the exhaust valve must first be engaged fully before the intake valve allows combustion to take place.
The solenoid control mechanism provides for this sequencing through the control of the fluid-controlled exhaust from the modified mechanisms. The two modified mechanisms, i.e., for the intake valve and for the exhaust valve, use the fluid flow patterns during their normal cycles set forth in the following table.

TABLE
Intake Intake Exhaust Exhaust _alve InletValve Outlet Valve Inlet Valve Outlet (A) Working:
Flow No Flow Flow Flow (B) Non-Working:
Flow Flow Flow No Flow From the above table, it is apparent that the flow of fluid into the modified mechanisms is not interfered with, but that the allowing of fluid flow out of the modified mechanism is the key to theîr functions.
An embodiment of a solenoid control mechanism within the scope of this invention is shown in Figures 15 - 18. The mechanism 900 includes a block 910 provided with numerous channels and ports therein. It includes a central longitudinal well 911, provided with a rounded countersunk floor 912 and an outlet bore 913. A pair of identical right and left transverse cylindrical channels 914, 915 are provided, which are longitudinally offset to provide upper right hand 914 and lower left hand 915 channels. Upper right hand channel 914 is connected to well 911 by bored conduit 916, and lower left hand channel 915 is connected to well 911 by means of bored conduit 917. Inlet to channel 914 is by conduit 918 connected to the intake mechanism, while inlet to channel 915 is by conduit 919 connected to the exhaust mechanism. Exhaust conduit 919 is at a lower level than intake conduit 918, which allows for the sequencing.
Longitudinal well 911 is connected to intersecting, transverse outlet bore 920 which leads to right hand and left hand internal chambers 921, 922, and then to outlet conduit 923. Right hand channel 914 vents to right hand chamber 921 via outlet por~ 924, while left hand channel 915 vents to left hand chamber 922 via outlet port 925. Fluid control is pro-vided by check valves 926, 927 in channels 914, 915, respectively.
Check valves 926, 927 comprise a ball 928, 929, normally held 1~333~2 again~t port 924, 925 by spring 930, 931, respect~vely. A governing mechanism, comDrising a cylindrical base 932, 933, three transverse arms 934, 935, and an upright port 936, 937, respectively, is secured within conduit 918, 919, respectively, is provided. The governing mechanism restricts the forward motion of the balls 928, 929, in order to minimi~e damage to the srpings 930, 931 through repeated compression. These two check valves 926, 927 thus allow the intake of fluid by the modified mechanisms at all times when the pressure differential permits such fluid flow.
A solenoid armature 950 is provided at the bo`ttom of central well 911, and this armature is described with reference to Figure 19. The armature 950 includes a main cyliDdrical body 951 having an upper bored well 952 therein, with a coiled spring 953 trapped therein. The lower portion of body 951 is provided with an encircling governing gap 954, and a lower cylindrical block 955. The upper portion of the body is provided with a larger diameter pillar 956 supporting a conventional armature coil 957 which is secured thereto. Conventional armature components and a coil winding (not shown) are also associated with the armature block 951 and the armature coil 957.
In operation, fluid under pressure which may come from the engine oil supply, although an independent source of fluid under-pressure may be provided for fail-safe operation, enters the modified mechanisms through ~onduit 923. The inlet flow is provided through branches 921 and 922 which feed check valves 926 and 927, respectively, through check valve ball seats and ports 924 and 925.
Fluid leaving the modified mechanisms enters through conduit 923, but instead of branching off, flows straight through bore 920, the flow through which is controlled by solenoid armature 950 (see Figure 19) in well 911. Armature 950 provides control of fluid flow through governing gap in block 951. r~hen in normal operation, i.e., with the intake outlet ~333~
closed, and with the exhaust outlet open, the spring 951 in the top well 952 forces the armature block 951 to Its normal, bottom position. In this position, fluid flow through bore 920 is guided through governing gap 954 in block 951 into conduit 917 allowing fluid exhaust from the exhaust mechanism to by-pass the check valve 927 and to relieve fluid pressure~
sllowing normal exhaust valve function. When the coil 957 (shown here without its winding) is activated, the armature block 951 is lifted, to a point where fluid outlet is pro-vided for both the exhaust mechanism (through conduit 917~ and the intake mechanism (through conduit 916) is allowed simultaneously. This effec-tively closes the intake valve while the exhaust valve is still function-ing normally. As the armature block 951 is raised further by means of the coil 957, the intake mechanism is fully disconnected by fluid directed through conduit 916 as a by-pass to check valve 926. l~hile this situation is established, the fluid flow through conduit 917 is effectively blocked through the raising of lower block 955 of armature block 951 to block the opening of conduit 917, which formerly opened on armature gap 954.
~nen the cylinder is re-activated, the electromagnet in coil 957 is de-activated, the armature is forced down by the force of gravity and by spring 951, to a point ~here conduits 916, 917 are again both in con-tact with fluid directed by armature gap 954. Thus, the exhaust is re-activated while the intake remains disabled. As the armature returns to its resting position, the fluid is again sealed off at conduit 916, providing no intake outlet for fluid and re-activating the intake mechanism.
Similarly, the exhaust mechanism which has already been re-activated, con-tinues to function in a normal manner.

. .

il333~Z
Another simplified embodiment of a control mechanism is shown in Figure 20. Here, the mechanism 975 includes a tubular casing 976 having one closed end 977 and an open flanged end 978. A pair of diametrically opposed ports 979 texhaust port) 982 and 980 (intake port), 981 are provided through the wall of the tubular casing 976 to which are at-tached fluia-carrying conduits 983, 986, 984 and 985 respective-ly .
Slidably disposed within casing 976 is a control body 987 having a cap 988 at one end and terminating in a longitudinally extending shaft 989. Shaft 989 connects to captive plug 990, slidably disposed within casing 976. The exposed face of plug 990 abuts a return spring 991, while the cap 988 of control body is acted on by a force shown by arrow 992, which may be a sol~Qid, a permanent magnet, an electromagnet, a spring, a hydraulic or pneumatic means.
The interior of the casing is thus provided with hydraulic chamber 993.
For cut-out operation, the intake 980 closes first, while the exhaust 979 remains slightly open after the regular stroke. In the cut-in operation, the exhaust 979 closes first. Deactivation of the intake 980 is stopped and normal operation is then reinstated. The opening and closing of the ports 979, 982, 980 and 981 is achieved by the activation of the control body and or the captive plug, which moves the control body either to open or to close ports 979, 982, 980 and 985. This control may be facilitated by setting the proper distances, i.e. by grooves or gates, in front of the ports.

:~3;;~

The retentive control means, or "brain" of the engine cylinder cutout system of this invention consists of two parts. The role of the first part is to determine the correct number of cylinders to be using in response to sen-sor output.
- On a normal 8-cylinder car traveling on a level road, at constant speed, the system automatically determines the driver- (i.e. throttle)-controlled input as to power demand. It next compares the normal load, i.e. expected speed, at engine output with the actual load; along with po-tential speed variations caused by additional weight, drag, other forces, and speed. It then determines the correct state of operation for the system, dis-engaging cylinders as required. In one example, the 8 cylinders are automati-cally cut to 4 at 90 k.p.h. with a fully-loaded car, flat road, ideal weather conditions, and minimal drag forces.
As the car climbs a hill, the speed varies (i.e. dS), and the rate of dS/dt determines the additional load on the engine. The brain deduces from dS/dt what an adequate engine response would be needed to maintain speed, if any charge is needed at all; (slight hills involve almost no speed fluctuation). The engine then responds to the signals from the "brain" and modifies the output accordingly. Its res-ponses are simplified in the following chart:

- SD ~9 -, 1~333~

S E N S O R I N P U T V S .
O U T P U T R E S P O N S E

CONDITION dS/dt dT/dt RESPONSE
Stable 0 0 0 Acceleration i)Voluntary 0 * Threshold * increase 0 ** Threshold ** increase 0 *** Threshold *** increase ii)Involuntary # 0 Threshold # decrease ## 0 Threshold ## decrease ##~ 0 Threshold ### decrease * indicates a slight increase in throttle setting ** indicates a moderate increase in throttle setting *** indicates a large increase in throttle setting # indicates a slight increase in speedometer reading ## indicates a moderate increase in speedometer reading ### indicates a large increase in speedometer reading Threshold * increase indicates an increase in number of cylinders active when a pre-determined power demand is sensed.
Threshold # decrease indicates a decrease in the number of active cylinders once a pre-determined power surplus is apparent~
The degree of response is dependant on the degree of the sensed load variation. This chart is simplified, as all vehicles have unique and characteristic parameters, which vary according to speed.
Both signals are analog based, with voltage variations between minimum (0) and maximum (1) initiating coded digital signals describing the zero throttle (0) and maximum throttle (1) settings through analog/digital converters. The twosignals are then compared with reference levels, i.e. a depression of 0.25 normally produces a speed of 30 k.p.h., initiating a normal re-sponse of shifting to 4 cylinders. Should a speed of 40 k.p.h.
be indicated, then the response would be a shifting to 2 cylinders.
Should a speed of 20 k.p.h. be recorded, the response would involve shifting to 6 cylinders. There is, after every switch, ,: ~

11333~2 ~

a slight delay before any further switching occurs, with the exception of the throttle override response which cuts all cy-linders in for emerging power situations.
Once the correct number of cylinders is chosen, then the firing pattern is chosen to allow for (1) minimal harmonic resonance (in the engine it supports) (2) provide for random selection of cut-in and cut-out cylinder in use.

lQ

,.: - .

Claims (22)

THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN EXCLUSIVE
PROPERTY OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:
1. An engine cylinder cutout system comprising:
(a) a plurality of uncoupling devices for selectively coupling or uncoupling associated valve operators from respective driven members, said uncoupling devices selectively operable for normal operation enabling the normal cycle of operation of the valve operators and for cutout operation interrupting said normal cycle in any phase of the operation of said value operators, the plurality of uncoupling devices being equal in number to the number of valves in the engine;
(b) shifting mechanism for selectively operating said uncoupling devices to provide variation of valve operation from normal cycles, allowing the valves to be opened or closed as required, and cutout operation, uncoup-ling selective ones of the valve operators so that selected exhaust valves can be maintained open in a controlled manner while associated selected in-take valves can be maintained closed, whereby a selected number of cylinders less than the total is cutout; and (c) retentive control means responsive to the status of vehicle operating parameters for randomly initiating operation of shifting mechanism associated with each said uncoupling device for random initial activation thereof, thereby selectively cutting out all cylinders in said engine a substantially even average amount of time, so that engine wear is balanced.
2. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said uncoupling devices are operated by fluid under substantially constant desired pressure.
3. The engine cylinder cutout system of claims 1 or 2 wherein said uncoupling device is specially constructed for selectively coupling or uncoupling a reciprocating pushrod member from a driven member, and for holding such driven member at a controlled position with respect to said pushrod member while said pushrod member motion itself is uninter-rupted, with said driven memver having a return stroke driving means, said uncoupling device comprising:
(a) a support means disposed between a selected pushrod member and a selected driven member;
(b) a variable length member connected to said support means and relatively movable with respect thereon;
(c) coupling means on said variable length member for engaging said selected pushrod member;
(d) means for selectively operating or deactivating said coupling means, whereby said variable length member may be selectively driven by said pushrod member when coupled thereto or, when uncoupled, not driven by said pushrod member while the motion of said pushrod is unimpeded with respect to said variable length member;
(e) length-varying means movably attached to said variable length member for permitting relative motion between first and second limit positions, said variable length member being at minimum and maximum lengths, respectively, when said length-varying means is disposed at its first and second limit positions respectively, said length-varying means being drivingly connected to said driven member; and (f) extension-actuating means for selectively extending said length-varying means to its second limit position relative to said variable length member and for holding said length-varying member at said position.
4. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 2 including at least one chamber for containing said fluid under pressure, and means for maintaining said fluid under substantially constant pressure.
5. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 4 wherein said fluid under pressure is a hydraulic fluid; and wherein said constant pressure is maintained by an hydraulic accumulator.
6. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 5 wherein said chamber is remote from said uncoupling device, said system including hydraulic fluid conduit lines leading from said cylinder to said uncoup-ling device, said hydraulic fluid conduit lines including valves selec-tively actuated by control means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
7. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 5 wherein said chamber is part of said uncoupling device, said system including a solenoid-operated, valve selectively actuated by control means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
8. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 4 wherein said fluid under pressure is a pneumatic fluid; and wherein said constant pressure is maintained by a pneumatic accumulator.
9. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 8 wherein said chamber is remote from said uncoupling device, said system including pneumatic fluid conduit lines leading from said cylinder to said uncoupling device, said pneumatic fluid conduit lines including valves selectively actuated by control means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves nor-mally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
10. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 8 wherein said chamber is part of said uncoupling device, said system including a solenoid-operated, one-way, piston-type valve selectively actuated by con-trol means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
11. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 4 wherein said fluid under pressure is an hydraulic fluid; and wherein said constant pressure is maintained by a movable piston forming part of the walls of said chamber.
12. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 11 wherein said chamber is remote from said uncoupling device, said system including hydraulic fluid conduit lines leading from said cylinder to said uncoup-ling device, said hydraulic fluid conduit lines including valves selec-tively actuated by control means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
13. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 11 wherein said chamber is part of said uncoupling device, said system including a solenoid-operated, deactivation cylinder selectively actuated by control means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
14. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 4 wherein said fluid under pressure is a pneumatic fluid, and wherein said constant pres-sure is maintained by a movable piston forming part of the walls of said chamber.
15. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 14 wherein said chamber is remote from said uncoupling device, said system including pneumatic fluid conduit lines leading from said cylinder to said uncoupling device, said pneumatic fluid conduit lines including valves selectively actuated by control means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
16. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 14 wherein said chamber is part of said uncoupling device, said system including a solenoid-operated, one-way, piston-type valve selectively actuated by control means: (a) to operate intake and exhaust valves normally; or (b) to control or cut out selected valves to maintain selected such valves open and to maintain associated selected other valves closed.
17. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said retentive control means controls a solenoid for each of said shifting mechanism, thereby causing fluid pressure to actuate selected ones of said uncoupling devices.
18. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said uncoupling devices are operated by mechanical means.
19. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 including memory means associated with said retentive control means and serving to assure a substantially even cutout of all the cylinders of the engine during different sequences of operation, the cutout line of the cylinders being distributed evenly amongst all the cylinders, so that engine wear is balanced.
20. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said retentive control means is manually programmable.
21. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said retentive control means is automatically programmable.
22. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said retentive control means retains the status of the immediately preceding change of operating parameters.

CLAIMS SUPPORTED BY THE SUPPLEMENTARY DISCLOSURE
SD 23, The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1, wherein said uncoupling device for controlling the valve for said internal combus-tion engine comprises:
(1) a casing;
(2) a composite operating mechanism comprising an inner pushrod and outer tappet rod telescopi-cally assembled together and slidably mounted within said casing;
and (3) controlled means actuatable for automatically (i) permitting said inner pushrod to slide with respect to said outer tappet rod so that said outer tappet rod is immov-able with respect to said casing, and (ii) locking said inner pushrod to said outer tappet rod, thereby to cause said inner pushrod to move said outer tappet rod slidably with respect to said casing.
SD 24. The device of claim SD 23 wherein said inner pushrod includes a major cylindrical portion slidably disposed within a major hollow cylindrical portion of said outer tappet rod.
SD 25. The device of claim SD 24 wherein said major hollow cylin-drical portion includes a minor central projecting pin, slidably disposed within a minor central bore at one end of said outer tappet rod.
SD 26. The device of claim SD 25 wherein said one end of said outer tappet rod includes a plurality of bores extending longitudinally therethrough, and said inner pushrod includes a central bore extending longitudinally therethrough.
SD 27. The device of claim SD 23 wherein said means (3) comprises:

(a) a first semi-toroidal groove in the inner pushrod;
(b) a plurality of discrete slits around the circum-ference of the outer tappet rod;
(c) a plurality of balls disposed within said discrete slits;
(d) a slidable member within said casing, said slidable member including a second semi-toroidal groove on the inner face thereof;
and (e) means for moving said slidable member (d) between (i) a first position, where said second groove is aligned with said first groove, thereby to permit said inner pushrod to slide with respect to said outer tappet rod, and (ii) a second position, where said second groove is not aligned with said first groove, thereby to lock said inner pushrod with respect to said outer tappet rod.
SD 28. The device of claim SD 27 wherein said slidable member comprises: a piston having a head portion and a rod portion, said second groove being disposed on said rod portion of said piston; and wherein said moving means comprises: a pressure fluid injectable into selected associated pressure chambers within said casing for acting against selected surfaces of the heat portion of said piston.
SD 29. The device of claim SD 28 including a lower pressure chamber within said casing for filling with said pressure fluid for urging the lower face of the head of said piston upwardly.
SD 30. The device of claim SD 28 including an intermediate pres-sure chamber within said casing for filling with said pressure fluid for urging the upper face of the head of said piston downwardly.

SD 31. The device of claim SD 28 including an upper pressure chamber within said casing for filling with said pressure fluid for urging the upper face of the rod of said piston downwardly.
SD 32. The device of claim SD 28 wherein said piston rod includes a shoulder engageable with said casing to limit the extent of the lower movement of said piston.
SD 33. The device of claim SD 28 wherein said casing includes an inner shoulder engageable with the upper face of the head of said piston to limit the extent of the upper movement of said piston.
SD 34. The device of claim SD 33 wherein said inner pushrod includes:
(a) an inner cylindrical rod;
(b) an intermediate hollow cylindrical bushing;
and (c) an outer hollow cylindrical slidable member, said outer member including a circumferential encircling first groove around the outer face thereof.
SD 35. The device of claim SD 34 wherein said outer tappet rod includes:
(a) a hollow cylindrical main portion, said main portion including a plurality of discrete encircling slits therearound;
and (b) an outer upper projecting rod.
SD 36. The device of claim SD 35 including a second slidable member disposed between the inner wall of said casing and the outer wall of said outer tappet rod, said second slidable member including a circum-ferential encircling second groove around the inner face thereof.
SD 37. The device of claim SD 35 wherein said means (3) com-prises:

(d) a plurality of balls disposed within said discrete encircling slits;
and (e) means for moving said slidable member between (i) a first position where said second groove is aligned with said first groove, (ii) a second position where said second groove is not aligned with said outer hollow cylindrical slidable member with the first groove thereon in its upper position, and (iii) a third position where said second groove is not aligned with said first groove when said outer hollow cylindrical slid-able member with the first groove thereon is in its lower position.
SD 38. The device of claim SD 37 wherein said moving means com-prises a pressure fluid injectable into selected pressure chambers within said casing for acting against selected surfaces of respective said mov-able members.
SD 39. The device of claim SD 37 wherein said hollow cylindrical main portion of said outer tappet rod includes a lower head portion.
SD 40. The device of claim SD 39 wherein said fluid pressure chambers include a lower pressure chamber for filling with said pressure fluid for urging the lower face of said lower head portion to move said member upwardly.
SD 41. The device of claim SD 39 wherein said fluid pressure chambers include a lower intermediate chamber for filling with said pres-sure fluid for urging the upper face of said lower head portion to move said member downwardly.
SD 42. The device of claim SD 36 wherein said means (3) comprises:
(d) a plurality of balls disposed within said discrete encircling slits;
and (e) means for moving said slidable member between (i) a first position where said second groove is aligned with said first groove, (ii) a second position where said second groove is not aligned with said outer hollow cylindrical slidable member with the first groove thereon in its upper position, and (iii) a third position where said second groove is not aligned with said first groove when said outer hollow cylindrical slid-able member with the first groove thereon is in its lower position.
SD 43. The device of claim SD 42 wherein said fluid pressure chambers include an upper intermediate chamber for filling with said pressure fluid for urging the lower face of said second slidable member upwardly.
SD 44. The device of claim SD 42 wherein said fluid pressure chambers include an upper chamber for filling with said pressure fluid for urging the upper face of said second slidable member downwardly.
SD 45. The device of claim SD 42 wherein said casing includes an upper inner shoulder for restricting the upper movement of said second slidable member.
SD 46. The device of SD 42 wherein said casing includes a false floor between said lower intermediate chamber and said upper intermediate chamber for simultaneously restricting lower movement of the second slidable member and upper movement of the head of said slidable member.

SD 47. The device of claim SD 23 wherein said inner pushrod includes a main lower cylindrical portion and a minor upper central pro-jection of lesser diameter than said lower cylindrical portion.
SD 48. The device of claim SD 47 wherein said outer tappet rod includes a main inner cylindrical portion and a hollow core within which said minor upper central projection is adapted to slide.
SD 49. The device of claim SD 48 wherein said outer tappet rod includes means to restrict lower movement thereof.
SD 50. The device of claim SD 23 wherein said inner pushrod includes a main lower cylindrical portion and a minor upper central pro-jection of lesser diameter than said lower cylindrical portion, and wherein said outer tappet rod includes a further main inner cylindrical portion and a hollow core within which said minor central projection of said pushrod is adapted to slide, and an outer slidable cylinder slidably disposed between the inner wall of said casing and the outer wall of said further main cylindrical portion.
SD 51. The device of claim SD 50 including cooperating shoulders on said outer tappet rod and said further cylindrical portion.
SD 52. The device of claim SD 46 wherein said means (3) com-prises:
(e) means (i) for urging said slidable member downwardly to require said outer tappet rod to move in unison with said inner pushrod with respect to said casing, and (ii) for urging said slidable member upwardly to permit said inner pushrod to slide with respect to said outer tappet rod.
SD 53. The device of claim SD 50 wherein said means (3) com-prises:

(e) means (i) for urging said slidable member downwardly to require said outer tappet rod to move in unison with said inner pushrod with respect to said casing, and (ii) for urging said slidable member upwardly to permit said inner pushrod to slide with respect to said outer tappet rod.
SD 54. The device of claim SD 53 wherein said means (e) includes a pressure chamber for filling with pressure fluid below the lower face of the base of said further cylindrical portion for urging said face upwardly, or above the upper face of the base of said further cylindrical portion for urging said face downwardly.
SD 55. The device of claim SD 23 wherein said inner pushrod com-prises a main lower cylindrical portion slidably disposed within the lower portion of said casing, said cylindrical portion including an upper cen-tral extension rod; wherein said outer tappet rod comprises a main lower cylindrical portion slidably disposed within the upper portion of said casing, a central lower well within which said upper extension rod is adapted to slide, and an upper pushrod engagement ball.
SD 56. The device of claim SD 55 wherein said means (3) comprises a lower chamber in said casing between said pushrod and said tappet rod and a means for filling said chamber with a pressure fluid so that, (i) when said chamber is filled with fluid, reciprocation of said pushrod provides corresponding reciprocation of said tappet rod;
and (ii) when said chamber is empty of fluid, reciprocation of said pushrod does not provide corresponding reciprocation of said tappet rod.

SD 57. The device of claim SD 55 wherein said inner pushrod and said outer tappet rod are longitudinally bored therethrough for normal oil lubrication.
SD 58. The device of claim SD 23 wherein said casing includes a lower portion of a first internal diameter, and an upper portion of a second larger internal diameter.
SD 59. The device of claim SD 58 wherein said inner pushrod com-prises a lower cylindrical portion adapted to slide reciprocatingly within the lower portion of said casing, a lower countersunk pushrod engagement face, and an upper reduced diameter upstanding extension rod; and wherein said outer tappet rod comprises an upper portion of larger diameter adapted to slide reciprocatingly within the upper portion of said casing, a lower portion of lesser diameter adapted to slide reciprocatingly within the lower portion of said casing, a lower well within which said extension rod is adapted to slide reciprocatingly, and an upper pushrod engagement ball.
SD 60. The device of claim SD 59 wherein the upper portion of said outer tappet rod is adapted to abut on an inner shoulder on said casing to restrict lower movement thereof.
SD 61. The device of claim SD 60 wherein said inner pushrod and said outer tappet rod are longitudinally bored therethrough for normal oil lubrication.
SD 62. The device of claim SD 60 wherein said casing includes an upper chamber, fed with pressure fluid through a pair of unimpeded flow conduits, and a lower chamber, fed with pressure fluid through a positive controlled flow conduit, whereby (i) when said lower chamber is filled with pressure fluid, reciprocation of said inner pushrod pro-vides a corresponding reciprocation of said outer tappet rod;
(ii) when said lower chamber is emptied of said pressure fluid and when said upper chamber is emptied of pressure fluid, reciprocation of said outer tappet rod does not provide a corresponding reciprocation of said tappet rod, with said outer tappet rod at its lower limit position;
and (iii) when said lower chamber is emptied of said pressure fluid and when said upper chamber is emptied of pressure fluid, reciprocation of said outer tappet rod does not provide a corresponding reciprocation of said outer tappet rod, with said outer tappet rod at a slightly elevated position to provide a slight bleed-off of said exhaust valve.
SD 63. The device of claim SD 62 including an additional unimpeded flow conduit from the upper portion of said lower pressure chamber to provide emergency pressure relief to said lower chamber.
SD 64. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said uncoupling device for controlling the valve for said internal com-bustion engine comprises:
(1) a mounting bushing;
(2) an inner and an outer coaxially assembled tappet rod assembly slidably mounted within said mounting bushing;
and (3) tappet rod length adjusting means operatively associated with said tappet rod assembly and actuatable to change the tappet rod length between a first preselected long length and a second preselected short length.
SD 65. The device of claim SD 64 wherein the tappet rod assembly includes: an outer cylindrical member, the lower end of which is connected to a lower tappet rod, with the outer cylindrical member being centrally bored; and an inner tappet rod slidably mounted within said central bore, said inner tappet rod including a tappet-engaging projection ball thereon.
SD 66. The device of claim SD 64 wherein said tappet rod length adjusting means comprises: an engagement member at the end of said outer cylindrical member, said engagement member including two different height shoulders connected by a spiral ramp so that the shoulders are 180° apart;
and an enlarged engagement member along the inner tappet rod, said enlarged engagement member including two different height shoulders con-nected by a spiral ramp so that the shoulders are 180° apart.
SD 67. The device of claim SD 66 wherein said engagement member on said inner cylinder comprises an integral enlargement.
SD 68. The device of claim SD 66 wherein said engagement member on said inner cylinder comprises a sloped end thereof.
SD 69. The device of claim SD 67 including directly driven means to rotate only said inner tappet rod and its engagement member through 180°
thereby to fix said tappet rod at an upper position independent of the operation of said pushrod.
SD 70. The device of claim 67 including directly driven means to rotate only said inner tappet rod and its engagement member through 180°
thereby to fix said tappet rod at an upper position independent of the operation of said pushrod.
SD 71. The device of claim SD 69 wherein said means includes a bushing having a polygonal inner face slidably engageable with a congruent polygonal outer face of said outer enlargement and operating means to rotate the bushing.
SD 72. The device of claim SD 70 wherein said means includes a bushing having a polygonal inner face slidably engageable with a congruent polygonal outer face of said outer enlargement and operating means to rotate the bushing.
SD 73. The device of claims SD 71 or SD 72 wherein said opera-ting means comprises a rack and pinion device.
SD 74. The device of claims SD 71 or SD 72 wherein said opera-ting means comprises an hydraulic ram.
SD 75. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said shifting mechanism comprises solenoid control mechanism comprising:
(a) a block;
(b) a central longitudinal control well therein;
(c) a first and a second transverse, fluid conducting valved bores therein each being provided with a fluid-flow conduit;
(d) a central, transverse fluid conducting bore therein, provided with open conduit connections to said transverse valved bores and valved con-duit connections to said valved bores, and con-necting to a main supply conduit;
and (e) actuated control means disposed in said control well for (i) providing fluid connection between said first valved conduit, said open conduit connection, said central bore and said main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connection between said open conduit connection and said second valved conduit;

(ii) providing fluid connection between said second valved conduit, said open conduit connection, said central bore and said main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connection between said open conduit con-nection and said first valved conduit;
and (iii) providing fluid connection between said first valved conduit, said open conduit connection, said central bore and said main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connection between said open conduit connection and said second valved conduit and providing fluid connection between said second valved conduit, said open conduit connection, said central bore and said main supply conduit while blocking off fluid connection between said open con-duit connection and said first valved conduit.
SD 76. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 75 wherein said actuated control means comprises an electromagnetically actuated solenoid having a body portion with an access gap and a blocking portion thereon.
SD 77. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 76 wherein said first valved conduit is connected to the exhaust mechanism.
SD 78. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 76 wherein said second valved conduit is connected to the intake mechanism.
SD 79. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 76 wherein said first valved conduit is connected to the exhaust mechanism, wherein said second valved conduit is connected to the intake mechanism and wherein said exhaust conduit is at a lower level than said intake conduit.
SD 80. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 75 wherein said valved bores are each controlled by spring actuated ball check valves.
SD 81. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 75 wherein said actuated control means is positively actuated to provide flow from main supply conduit at a sufficient pressure to flow through valved bores and then through the fluid flow conduit associated with each said valved bore.
SD 82. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 79 wherein said actuated control means is positively actuated to provide fluid flow through said open conduit connection only to said first valved bore, allowing fluid exhaust from said exhaust mechanism to relieve fluid pres-sure and allowing normal exhaust valve function.
SD 83. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 79 wherein said actuated control means is positively actuated to provide fluid flow through the open conduit connection to both said first valved bore and said second valved bore, thereby closing the intake valve while allowing the exhaust valve to function normally.
SD 84. The solenoid control mechanism of claim SD 79 wherein said actuated control means is positively actuated to provide fluid flow through the open conduit connection only to said second valved bore, thereby disconnecting the intake valve mechanism.

SD 85. The device of claim SD 23 wherein said inner pushrod includes a cylindrical portion slidably disposed with its base within said casing and within a coextensive major bore within said outer tappet rod.
SD 86. The device of claim SD 85 wherein said inner pushrod includes a control projecting pin slidably disposed within a minor central bore communicating with the major bore within said outer tappet rod.
SD 87. The device of claim SD 85 including a first pressure fluid inlet port to an upper portion of a first in-ternal fluid pressure chamber for operation of said outer push-rod by the reciprocation of said inner pushrod.
SD 88. The device of claim SD 85 including a pressure fluid inlet port in said outer pushrod leading to a second internal fluid pressure chamber.
SD 89. The device of claim SD 85 including a second pressure fluid inlet selectively operable as a free-flow port and as a one-way inlet port leading to a lower portion of a first internal fluid pressure chamber.
SD 90. The engine cylinder cutout system of claim 1 wherein said shifting mechanism comprises:
(a) an open tubular casing;
(b) a control body slidably disposed within said tubular casing, said control body including a head portion, adopted to abut with a rim in said tubular casing, thereby to limit move-ment of said control body in one direction;
(c) a lesser diameter tubular rod connected bet-ween said control body and a second captive slidable plug fully disposed within said tubular casing; and (d) two pairs of ports adapted to lead hydraulic fluid into and out of the interior of said tubular casing.
SD 91. The control mechanism of claim SD 90 including means for applying an activating force to the head portion of said control body.
SD 92. The control mechanism of claim SD 91 wherein said activat-ing force is derived from a solonoid or a spring.
SD 93. The control mechanism of claim SD 91 including means adapted to act upon an exposed face of said captive plug selectively to act against said means for applying said activating force.
SD 94. me control mechanism of claim SD 93 wherein said means comprises a return spring.
SD 95. The control mechanism of claim SD 90 wherein said ports are so disposed that said control body is adopted to close off a pair of dia-metrically opposed ports while said captive plug is adopted to open the other pair of diametrically opposed ports.
SD 96. The control mechanism of claim SD 95 including spacing grooves or gates to adjust the proper distance between said control body and said captive plug.
SD 97. The control mechanism of claim SD 91 wherein said activat-ing force is derived from a permanent magnet or an electromagnet.
SD 98. The control mechanism of claim SD 91 wherein said activat-ing force is derived from hydraulic means or pneumatic means.
CA 348753 1980-03-28 1980-03-28 Engine cylinder cutout system and control therefor Expired CA1133342A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CA 348753 CA1133342A (en) 1980-03-28 1980-03-28 Engine cylinder cutout system and control therefor

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
CA 348753 CA1133342A (en) 1980-03-28 1980-03-28 Engine cylinder cutout system and control therefor
EP19810301342 EP0037269A1 (en) 1980-03-28 1981-03-27 Engine cylinder cutout system

Publications (1)

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CA1133342A true CA1133342A (en) 1982-10-12

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EP0037269A1 (en) 1981-10-07 application

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