CA1132325A - Fiber reinforced multi-ply stampable thermoplastic sheet - Google Patents

Fiber reinforced multi-ply stampable thermoplastic sheet

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Publication number
CA1132325A
CA1132325A CA306,881A CA306881A CA1132325A CA 1132325 A CA1132325 A CA 1132325A CA 306881 A CA306881 A CA 306881A CA 1132325 A CA1132325 A CA 1132325A
Authority
CA
Canada
Prior art keywords
percent
sheet
mat
layer
inch
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA306,881A
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Michael P. Dellavecchia
Joseph E. Mackey
Albert H. Steinberg
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Allied Corp
Original Assignee
Allied Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US81663077A priority Critical
Priority to US816,630 priority
Application filed by Allied Corp filed Critical Allied Corp
Priority claimed from CA000392604A external-priority patent/CA1137724A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of CA1132325A publication Critical patent/CA1132325A/en
Expired legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/12Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin next to a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C70/00Shaping composites, i.e. plastics material comprising reinforcements, fillers or preformed parts, e.g. inserts
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/18Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin characterised by the use of special additives
    • B32B27/20Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin characterised by the use of special additives using fillers, pigments, thixotroping agents
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B37/00Methods or apparatus for laminating, e.g. by curing or by ultrasonic bonding
    • B32B37/14Methods or apparatus for laminating, e.g. by curing or by ultrasonic bonding characterised by the properties of the layers
    • B32B37/15Methods or apparatus for laminating, e.g. by curing or by ultrasonic bonding characterised by the properties of the layers with at least one layer being manufactured and immediately laminated before reaching its stable state, e.g. in which a layer is extruded and laminated while in semi-molten state
    • B32B37/153Methods or apparatus for laminating, e.g. by curing or by ultrasonic bonding characterised by the properties of the layers with at least one layer being manufactured and immediately laminated before reaching its stable state, e.g. in which a layer is extruded and laminated while in semi-molten state at least one layer is extruded and immediately laminated while in semi-molten state
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B38/00Ancillary operations in connection with laminating processes
    • B32B38/06Embossing
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2309/00Use of inorganic materials not provided for in groups B29K2303/00 - B29K2307/00, as reinforcement
    • B29K2309/08Glass
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B38/00Ancillary operations in connection with laminating processes
    • B32B2038/0052Other operations not otherwise provided for
    • B32B2038/0064Smoothing, polishing, making a glossy surface
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2262/00Composition of fibres which form a fibrous or filamentary layer or are present as additives
    • B32B2262/10Inorganic fibres
    • B32B2262/101Glass fibres
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2305/00Condition, form or state of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2305/08Reinforcements

Abstract

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE
Reinforced thermoplastic polymer composite sheets, formable into smooth, shaped objects in a stamping process.The composite sheet is produced by laminating together (1) a first layer of thermoplastic resin containing short glass fibers and a mineral filler such as kaolin, (2) a backing reinforcing layer comprising a long glass mat impregnated by thermoplastic resin and (3) optionally a third layer similar to the first layer.
The long glass mat is positioned within the reinforcing layer during impregnation, whereby the mat becomes encased in a resin matrix.

Description

BACK~ROUND OF THE INVENTION
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
This invention relates to reinforced thermoplastic mate-rial and more specifically to apparatus and method for extruding a stampable, reinforced thermoplastic composite sheet containing, as reinforcement, a glass fiber mat.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART
In the apparatus and method used to form stampable rein-forced thermoplastic composite sheets, a long glass fiber mat is sandwiched between a glass fiber filled layer of thermoplastic resin and a fiber-free layer of the resin, and laminated into a multi-ply product while the fiber-free resin layer is in a molten condition.
One of the major problems with such systems is the difficulty of coating substantially all of the fibers of the mat during lamination. The problem is particularly troublesome when mats having a high concentration of glass fiber or utilizing chopped glass fiber strands are employed. In order to alleviate the problem of incomplete coating, it has often been necessary to reduce mat weight and filler concentration, increase resin quantity, utilize resin modifiers and decrease processing speeds.
These constraints increase the cost and reduce performance characteristics of the laminated product.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention provides a strong, light stamp-able thermoplastic sheet and a method and means for producing such sheet in an economical, reliable manner. The sheet is essentially free of surface waviness and long glass show-through, comprising in terms of percent by weight of each layer (a) at least one layer comprising from about 40 percent to 100 percent of a synthetic thermoplastic polymer, about 0 percent to 50 percent of a par-~32~5 ticulate filler, and 0 percent to 45 percent short glass fibers having a length ranging from 0.01 to 3/4 of an inch and arranged generally parallel to the plane of the sheet surface, (b) a reinforcing layer adjoining said one layer comprising 50 percent to 100 percent of synthetic thermoplastic polymer on an extruded basis, a long glass fiber mat comprised of fibers having a length of at least 1 inch and having a weight ranging from .1 to 16 ounces per square foot of mat surface area and particulate fillers ranging from 0 percent to 50 percent, and (c) mat positioning means disposed between said at least one layer and said mat, for holding said mat within said reinforcing layer during formation of said composite, said mat being substantially encased in a matrix of the thermoplastic polymer and said reinforcing layer being essentially free of short glass fibers.
In addition, the present invention provides composite laminated sheet comprising the steps of (a) blending and extruding a first sheet layer comprising from about 40 percent to 100 percent of thermoplastic polymer, about 0 percent to 50 percent of a parti-culate filler and 0 percent to 45 percent short glass fibers having a length ranging from 0.01 to 3/4 of an inch and arranged in a plane generally parallel to the sheet surface, (b) embossing said first sheet layer in a roll stack to form an embossed surface thereon containing a plurality of projections, (c) blending and extruding a second sheet layer comprising from about 50 percent to 100 percent of synthetic thermoplastic polymer and from 0 percent to 50 percent particulate filler, but being essentially free of glass fibers, (d) feeding said first sheet, said second sheet and a long fiber glass mat, the fibers of which have a length of at least 1 inch, into the nip of a set of laminating rolls while the resin of the second sheet is still in a molten condition, the clearance between the rolls being less than the thickness of the 3~5 sheets and glass mat being fed to the nip of said rolls, whereby the long fiber glass mat is positioned within said second sheet during impregnation of said mat thereby and said first and second sheets are laminated into a smooth multi-ply product.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
The invention will be more fully understood and further advantages will become apparent when reference is made to the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings in which:
Figure 1 illustrates schematically a system for pro-ducing composite sheets of this invention;
Figure 2 illustrates a stamping press for the sheets of of this invention;
Figure 3 illustrates a schematic cross section of a composite sheet of this invention;
Figure 4 illustrates an alternate construction of the sheet shown in Figure 3;
Figure 5 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the i nventlon .
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
Referring to the drawings, a first extruder 11 receives a mixture of thermoplastic resin such as nylon, short glass and particulate filler and extrudes same through a die to produce a filled sheet 13 which is embossed by roller 70 of stack 14 so as to form an embossed surface 72 thereon containing a plurality of projections 74. A similar thermoplastic sheet 15 is produced from extruder 16 and embossed in similar fashion by roller 76 of stack 17. A third extruder 19 feeds a thermoplastic sheet 20 into laminating rolls 21 simultaneously with sheets 13 and 15, and long ~13Z~2S
glass mat or mats 23 which are fed from roll or rolls 24. It is important that the sheet 20 be in a molten condition at the point where the sheets converge on the rolls 21 and that the sheets 13 and 15 be below the melting point of the polymer so that projec-tions 74 position the glass mat or mats 23 within the molten sheet 20 during impregnation of the mat(s) 23 by the sheet 20. In this manner, the long glass reinforcing mat becomes substantially encased in the sheet 20 and does not affect surface qualities of sheets 13 and 15 when they are laminated together. The sheet is subsequently cut with cutter mechanism 26 on conveyor 27 and fed to stacking table 28.
An important feature of this embodiment of the method is the processing conditions at the roll stack 21.
The clearance between rolls 21(a) and 21(b) is less than the combined thickness of the four components 13, 15, 20 and 23.
(Thickness of mat 23 is measured under little or no compression.) This is necessary to effect an impregnation of mat 23 by sheet 20, and lamination of the resulting product to sheets 13 and 15.
The temperature of the sheet 20 should be above (at least 10 C. above) the thermoplastic melting point to provide adequate residual heat to allow for cooling of sheet 20 between the e~truder die 30 and the roll stack 21 and allow the glass mat to be uniformly impregnated thereby. Preferably, the sheet is 50C. to 100C. above the polymer melting point at the point of convergence between rolls 21(a) and 21(b~. Heating the sheet to a temperature higher than 350C. in the extruder may cause degrada-tion of the polymer and results in excessive energy consumption.
Lower temperatures result in inadequate impregnation of the mat 23 by sheet 20, including inadequate flow of the polymer into the interstices of the glass mat, inadequate bonding of sheets 13 and 1~3~;~2X

15 to sheet 20r and inadequate binding of the fibers to the poly-mer resulting in poor physical properties in the final product.
For the same reasons, the pressure applied by rolls 21(a) and 21(b) should range from 100 to 1500 pounds per linear inch, and preferably from 150 to 400 pounds per linear inch, to ensure adequate bonding of the layers and impregnation of the glass mat 23 by sheet 20. Rolls 21(a) and 21(b) must have ade-quate diameter and wall thickness and bearings of sufficient load bearing capacity to prevent excessive deflection of rolls 21(a) and 21~b). Excessive deflection of rolls 21(a) and 21(b)r that is deflection of the order of about 3 thousandths inch or morer can result in non-uniform impregnation of glass mat 23 by sheet 20r non-uniform bonding of sheets 13 and 15 to sheet 20r non-uniform surface appearancer and non-uniform thickness of sheet 25.
Sheet 13 after leaving embossing stack 14 contacts roll 21(d) and then roll 21(a). Sheet 15, after leaving embossing stack 17 contacts roll 21(c) and then roll 21(b). Rolls 21(c) and 21(d) are maintained at a temperature close to but below the polymer melting point, preferably 5 to 40C. below the polymer melting point. Rolls 21(a) and 21(b) are maintained at a temperature 10 to 70C. below the polymer melting point. The temperatures of rolls 21(a), 21(b), 21(c) and 21(d) and infrared heaters 30(a), 30(b) are adjusted so that the temperature of sheets 13 and 15 is high enough to achieve strong bonding of sheets 13 and 15 to sheet 20, but not so high as to result in sticking of sheet 13 to roll 21(d) or 21(c) or of sheet 15 to roll 21(a) or 21(b), softening of projections 74 or degradation of the surface quality of sheet 25.
Cooling rolls, such as rolls 29(a) and 29(b), can be used to quickly lower the temperature of laminate 25 sufficiently for easy cutting on cutter mechanism 26.
An alternate embodiment, illustrated in Figure 5, would have the glass mat 123 impregnated by sheet 120 in a separate operation. Under these circumstances the roll 121(a) is provided with a plurality of projections 174 for positioning the mat 123 within sheet 120 during impregnation of the mat 123 by the sheet 120. The ends of the projections force the mat 123 into the sheet 120, causing molten portions of the sheet 120 from extruder 119 to flow within passageways formed by adjacent projections to encom-pass the mat 123. The projections thus position the mat centrally of the sheet 120 and hold it therewithin, facilitating coating of the mat 123 by the sheet during impregnation. The impregnated mat 125 thus produced can be used in a stamping operation or laminated to sheet(s) 13, 15 as described hereinafter in more detail. Fur-ther, a plurality of embossing rolls 121(a) and 121(b) can be employed, the roll 121(b) being provided with a plurality of projections 174l similar to projections 174 of roll 121(a), for positioning mat 123' in sheet 120.
Mat positioning may also be accomplished by means of a screen 80, show in Figures 3 and 4, interposed between sheet 13 and mat 23 prior to lamination, the strands of the screen 80 form ing porjections and the openings thereof forming passageways that function in substantially the same way as the projections and passageways of sheets 13, 15 or roll 21(a). The screen 80 facilitates impregnation of mat 23 melt 20 and provides a further reinforcing means for the composite sheet. Typically, the screen 80 has a mesh size ranging from about 1 in. to No. 8 U.S.
Sieve Size, and is composed of metal, plastic, fibrous material such as glass, graphite, cotton, nylon, polyester, cellulose acetate or the like. As used herein, the term is intended to include such mat positioning means as a perforated plate, expanded metal sheet, scrim and the like.
Whether the projections are located on the sheets 13, ~ 13;~3~
15 or on the roll 21(a), their number and configuration will vary depending on such processing parameters as mat density, filler concentration, laminating time and temperature and the like.
Typically, the projections are cone-shaped members having a height of about .01 to .1 inch and a base perimeter of about .2 to .8 inch, and either randomly or regularly spaced about .06 to 1 inch apart over substantially the entire area of the mat contacting surface of the sheet or laminating roll employed. The projections can, alternatively, be shaped in the form of a pyramid, cylinder, cube, or the like of regular or irregular configuration arranged to form a regular pattern or an irregular pattern such as a doodle or the like.
Following impregnation of glass mat 123 by sheet 120 in a separate operation, the combined sheet 125 can be laminated to sheet 13, or to sheets 13 and 15 in a laminating process wherein the layers are bonded under heat and pressure. Lamination of the combined sheet 125 to sheet 13 or to sheets 13 and 15 may also be effected during the heating and stamping operation wherein differ-ent laminates are assembled depending on the part to be produced.
An example of the latter method is shown in Fig. 2. A sandwich 25 built from layers 13, 15 and combined sheet 125 is heated in oven 34. This heating step serves to condition the sheets for stamping in press 36 and also to effect a slight bond between the layer interfaces. The subsequent pressure in press 36 has the effect of simultaneously laminating the mat containing sheet 125 to sheets 13, 15 and forming the resulting composite into a part.
A composite sheet typically produced is illustrated in Fig. 3. It comprises: (a) one or more surface layers containing 40% to 100% polymer, 0% to 45% of well-dispersed, randomly ori-ented, short glass fibers and 0% to 50% particulate filler, (b) areinforcing layer consisting essentially of long glass reinforcing 3~3ZS
- weighing .1 to 16 ounces per square foot, together with the mat positioning means herein shown in the form of a screen 80, encased in a thermoplastic polymer matrix containing, on an extruded basis, from 50 to 100 percent thermoplastic resin and from 0 to 50 percent particulate filler, such that there is essentially no migration of the long glass fibers to the surface layer 13 and no migration of the short glass fibers, if present, to the reinforcing layer.
The stampable composite sheet may have one or two defect-free surfaces. The short, well-dispersed fibers 38, if present, are randomly but predominantly two-dimensionally oriented in the plane of the sheets 13 and 15. That is, more than 50~ of the fibers are aligned substantially parallel to the plane of the sheet. Such orientation of the short fiber is easily achieved in extrusion, rolling, drawing or similar orientation-inducing processes, and is preferable for purposes of this invention in achieving smooth surfaced sheets.
The thickness of the surface sheet should be at least 10 mils greater than the height of the projections 74, if present thereon, to prevent tearing during lamination. Typically, the surface sheet 13 has a thickness of at least 20 mils. A thinner surface sheet may also permit the pattern of the reinforcing mat 23 to be visible on the surface of the composite sheet 25. The minimum thickness of sheet 20 is determined by the need to impreg-nate glass fiber mat 23 and is typically about 30-80 mils. If thickness of sheet 20 is less than about 30 mils, then glass fiber mat 23 is likely to be non-uniformly impregnated into sheet 20 and composite sheet 25 is likely to have non-uniform properties. I
The thermoplastic polymers which can be used in forming the sheet compositions which may be stamped into shaped objects in ascordance with the methods of the present invention include the ~,f "
; :

~13~3~X

various thermoplastic materials normally used in injection molding, extrusion, vacuum forming, blow molding, fiber spinning, or simi-lar thermoplastic processing techniques.
Suitable thermoplastic resinous materials which may be utilized in making the composite laminate of the invention include, for example, the alkenyl aromatic resins typified by polystyrene, styrene copolymers, blends and graft copolymers of styrene and rubber and the like. The invention may be practiced utilizing polyvinyl chloride or copolymers of vinyl chloride or vinylidene chloride.
Particularly desirable thermoplastics in such composi-tions are the polyamides, that is, polymers having regularly recurring amide groups as an integral part of the main chain.
Polyamides such as nylon 6,6 (a condensation product of hexa-methylene diamine and adipic acid) and nylon 6 (the polymerization product of e-aminOcaprOiC acid or e-caprolactam) are examples of two polyamides or nylons.
Polyolefins may also be employed, including polymers and copolymers of ethylene, propylene, methylpentene and blends thereof.
Additional polymers which can be utilized include poly-urethane, polysulfone, polycarbonate and linear polyesters such as polyethylene terephthalate and polybutylene terephthalate; cellu-lose esters such as cellulose acetate, and cellulose propionate;
halogenated polylefins and polyacetals.
Also included in the term "polymer" are blends or copoly-mers of two or more polymeric materials. Illustrative of such polymers are polyethylene/polypropylene, ethylene-acrylic acid-vinylacetate terpolymers and the like.
The glass fiber used in making the fiber mat is prefer-ably used in the form of strands or bundles which are at least about 1 inch to continuous in length. The reinforcing mat may be _g_ ' ~3~32S

woven or nonwoven. The strands or fiber comprising the reinforc-ing mat, if nonwoven, are held together either by resinous adhe-sive binders (thermosetting or thermoplastic resins) or by "need-ling" or, if woven, by the mechanical interaction of the randomly patterned weblike structure.
The individual glass strands in the mat are comprised of about 2 to 400, preferably 5 to 120, filaments per strand. Each filament is about 0.00030 to about .001 inch, preferably 0.00035 to 0.00085 inch in diameter. The glass mat comprising the rein-forcing phase may have a weight of from 0.3 to 16 ounces persquare foot.
The short glass fiber reinforcement is at least about 0.01 inch in average length in the final product. These short lengths of fibrous reinforcement are obtained because of the characteristics of the processing apparatus used to compound or blend this reinforcement with the thermoplastic resin. For example, if fibers 1/8 inch or longer are placed in the feed hopper of a single screw extruder along with the resin, the fibers will ordinarily be broken down into lengths shorter than the original 1/8 inch starting length because of abrasion, shear, turbulence, and mechanical work performed upon the fibers. Longer lengths (e.g., mean lengths longer than 0.010 inch in a major portion of the short fiber reinforcement) may be retained by minimizing the amount of shear or mechanical breakdown of fiber length, with some sacrifice in homogeneity or prolonged processing times although lengths greater than 3/4 inch are not desirable for the object of this invention since they must flow into ribs, etcO
during stamping. Another processing machine which may be used to blend and/or manufacture the short fiber-filled resinous sheet is a twin screw extruder. In this case, the filamentary reinforcing material may be added to agitated heat plastified polymer between `` 113Z3~5 :he screws of the extruder through a feed port such as a volatile (vent) port. In the latter case, the filamentary reinforcing material may be fed to the twin screw extruder in the form of yarn or roving, and the short fiber lengths would be obtained by the mechanical breakup performed by the mixing action of the screws.
Glass fibers as normally used for reinforcement of thermoplastics may be treated or coated with a sizing composition.
Standard sizing agents usually consist of several components, each of which possesses a distinct function. For example, a binder or film former gives the glass fiber strand integrity for workability and prevents fuzzing and aids in distribution of the sizing agent;
a lubricant prevents destruction of the strand by abrasion of the individual filaments against each other and against fiber handling equipment; a coupling agent assists in obtaining greater adhesion between the glass fibers and the polymeric resin yielding improved strength characteristics; an emulsifying or dispersing agent allows sufficient dissolution of the various ingredients in the required carrying agent (frequently water) and improves compati-bility between the various ingredients. In addition, pH adjusters, antistatic agents, wetting agents and surfactants are also often added to sizing formulations. Ordinarily, organosilicon compounds may suitably be employed as coupling agents. For example, halo-genated or nonhalogenated vinyl and alkyl containing, alkylalkoxy, alkenyl, aminoalkyl, aminoalkoxy, acyloxy, alkenyl acyloxy and similar silanes, their hydrolysis products and polymers of the hydrolysis products are suitable for such use. Formulations of this kind and methods of use are known to those skilled in the art.
Another constituent of the improved thermoplastic sheet material herein described is particulate filler. Such fillers may be selected from a wide variety of minerals, metals, metal oxides, siliceous materials, metal salts, and mixtures thereof. These ` ~3~ZS

fillers may optionally be treated with various coupling agents or adhesion promoters, as is known to those skilled in the art. Ad-vantageous physical properties are achieved if the filler material has a Young's modulus of 107 psi or greater and at least a Young's modulus twice as great as that of the polymer. Examples of fillers included in these categories are alumina, aluminum hydrates, feldspar, asbestos, talc, calcium carbonates, clay, carbon black, ~uartz, novaculite and other forms of silica, kaoli-nite, bentonite, garnet, mica, saponite, beidellite, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, etc. The foregoing recited fillers are illustrative only and are not meant to limit the scope of fillers that can be utilized in this invention.
The particulate filler may be added to the thermo-plastic resin before, during, or after the addition of the short glass fibers to the resin. Thus, for example, filler and resin pellets may be fed to the feed hopper of a single screw extruder;
the mixture is blended and conveyed towards the die. Short glass fibers can be added to the molten mixture at a vent hole or other such opening downstream of the feed hopper, and the mixture then extruded into pellets, or preferably, directly into sheet of the appropriate thickness for lamination with the glass mat reinforce-ment. In the extrusion process, the short fibers will emerge oriented randomly in the plane of the extruded sheet.
Other minor additives which may be of value in sheet formulations include antistatic agents, plasticizers, lubricants, nucleating agents, impact modifiers, colorants, heat and light stabilizers, or other similar processing aids and adjuvants.
Each of the foregoing constituents performs a specific function within the composite material. The thermoplastic resin is, of course, the matrix which binds the other constituents together. As the matrix, the resin influences the mechanical and ```` 1~ 3Z~5 physical properties of the composite sheet. If a stamped producthaving an extremely high thermal resistance is required, for example, a nylon or linear polyester would be utilized as the matrix rather than polyethylene or polypropylene. If an extremely high impact resistance was required, for example, an impact resis-tant styrene copolymer or polycarbonate may be used rather than polystyrene or a more brittle linear polyester.
With sheets formed of nylon 6 resin, it is preferred to utilize talc as a nucleating agent for the nylon. For this pur-pose about .5 to 1.5% or more talc by weight of the nylon is incorporated into the sheet. Preferably, the sheet contains about 1% talc based on the weight of the nylon. Other nucleating agents may alternatively be employed in similar amounts with nylon or other crystalline polymers.
While composites without filler may be formed, the most desirable sheets include filler.
The functions of the particulate filler are: (1) to increase the modulus and stiffness of the composite sheet and (2) to provide a more economical composition.
The functions of the short fiber reinforcement are: (1) to increase the sheet stiffness and mechanical strength, (2) to increase the resin-phase melt viscosity, (3) to provide reinforce-ment in addition to that provided by the long glass fiber mat, (4) to allow flow of a reinforced plastic mixture into small holes, bosses, ribs, apertures, etc., during stamping and (5) to yield an improved surface in which most short dispersed fibers are oriented and lie in the plane of the sheet. In addition to the ability to form relatively narrow reinforced ribs, bosses, or similar sec-tions, because of flow of short fibers into such sections, the high melt viscosity of the resin-filler-short fiber mixture aids in promoting uniformity of properties. Furthermore, because of 1~ 3Z32S

the generally enhanced moldability of the present compositions,longer, thinner and more complex configurations or parts can be molded than heretofore known.
The short fibers oriented parallel to the plane of the sheet (in distinction to perpendicular to the plane of the sheet) result in a smooth surface free of glass mat and projecting fiber ends.
The present invention is more particularly described in the following examples which are intended as illustrative only since numerous modifications and variations therein will be apparent to those skilled in the art.
Shaping of the sheet can be accomplished in a deep drawing press which has a polished steel die-set to produce 5-inch diameter cylindrical cups. The temperature of the polished steel die-set can be adjusted by means of electric heaters, and main-tained at approximately 140 C. The steel molds used are highly polished and chrome-plated (mirror finished).
The preheated sheet can be transferred to the stamping press, and stamped at a pressure of 800 psi maintained for 10 seconds. The stamped part can be cooled to room temperature, main-tained at room temperature for 24 hours, and the flat bottom of the cup then cut out for surface roughness testing.
The following examples are presented to provide a more complete understanding of the invention. The specific techniques, conditions, materials, proportions and reported data set forth to illustrate the principles and practice of the invention are exem-plary and should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention.
EXAMPLE
Nylon 6 resin is blended with 25% short glass fibers and 15~ kaolin in extruder 11 and extruded into sheet 13. A

`~
3~5 sheet 15 of similar composition is extruded by extruder 16. Sheet.s 13, 15 are embossed by rolls 70, 76 to provide each of the sheets with a mat contacting surface having a plurality of projections 74.
Both sheets 13, 15 are brought together with glass mats 23 and molten sheet 20 at the nip of laminating rolls 21(a), 21(b). The mats 23 are positioned within sheet 20 by projections 74 to form a middle reinforcing sheet comprising 75~ nylon and 25~ glass mat.
The resulting sandwich is laminated and finished in the nip of rolls 21(a), 21(b) and on rolls 29(a), 29(b). The resulting sheet is cut into discrete blanks and stored.
Having thus described the invention in rather full detail, it will be apparent that these details need not be fully adhered to but that various changes and modifications may suggest themselves to one skilled in the art, all falling within the scope of the invention as defined by the subjoined claims.

Claims (8)

We claim:
1. A smooth-surfaced thermoplastic composite laminated sheet being essentially free of surface wavi-ness and long glass show through comprising in terms of percent by weight of each layer: (a) at least one layer comprising from about 40 percent to 100 percent of a synthetic thermoplastic polymer, about 0 percent to 50 percent of a particulate filler, and 0 percent to 45 percent short glass fibers having a length ranging from 0.01 to 3/4 of an inch and arranged qenerally parallel to the plane of the sheet surface, (b) a reinforcing layer adjoining said one layer comprising 50 percent to 100 percent of synthetic thermoplastic polymer on an extruded basis, a long glass fiber mat comprised of fibers having a length of at least 1 inch and having a weight ranging from .1 to 16 ounces per square foot, particulate filler ranging from 0 percent to 50 percent on an extruded basis, and (c) mat positioning means dis-posed between said at least one layer and said Mat, for holding said mat within said reinforcing layer during formation of said composite, whereby said mat being substantially encased in a matrix of the thermoplastic polymer and said reinforcing layer is essentially free of short glass fibers.
2. A smooth-surfaced thermoplastic composite as recited in claim 1, wherein said mat positioning means comprises a plurality of projections integral with said at least one layer.
3. A smooth-surfaced thermoplastic composite as recited in claim 1, wherein said mat positioning means is a screen having a mesh size ranging from about 1 to No. 8 U.S Sieve Size.
4. A process for producing a composite laminated sheet comprising the steps of:
(a) extruding a first sheet layer com-prising from about 40 percent to 100 percent of thermoplastic polymer, about 0 percent to 50 percent of a particulate filler and 0 percent to 45 percent short glass fibers having a length ranging from 0.01 to 3/4 of an inch and arranged in a plane generally parallel to the sheet surface;
(b) embossing said first sheet layer in a roll stack to form an embossed surface thereon con-taining a plurality of projections;
(c) extruding a second sheet layer com-prising from about 50 percent to 100 percent of synthetic thermoplastic polymer and from 0 percent to 50 percent particulate filler, but being essentially free of glass fibers;
(d) feeding said first sheet, said second sheet and a long fiber glass mat, the fibers of which have a length of at least 1 inch, into the nip of a set of laminating rolls while the resin of the second sheet is still in a molten condition, the embossed surface of said first sheet facing said glass mat, the clearance between the rolls being less than the thickness of the sheets and glass mat being fed to the nip of said rolls, whereby the long glass mat is positioned within said second sheet during impregnation of said mat thereby and said first and second sheets are laminated into a smooth multi-ply product.
5. A process as recited in claim 4, wherein said projections are regularly positioned on said embossed surface.
6. A process as recited in claim 4, wherein each of said projections has a height ranging from about .01 to .1 inch.
7. A process as recited in claim 4, wherein the distance between adjacent projections ranges from about .06 to 1 inch.
8. A process as recited in claim 4, wherein a roll of said stack has an embossing surface provided with a plurality of indentations.
CA306,881A 1977-07-18 1978-07-06 Fiber reinforced multi-ply stampable thermoplastic sheet Expired CA1132325A (en)

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US81663077A true 1977-07-18 1977-07-18
US816,630 1977-07-18

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CA000392604A CA1137724A (en) 1977-07-18 1981-12-17 Fiber reinforced multi-ply stampable thermoplastic sheet

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CA1132325A true CA1132325A (en) 1982-09-28

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JP (1) JPS6054183B2 (en)
CA (1) CA1132325A (en)
DE (1) DE2831363A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2397938B1 (en)
GB (2) GB2001282B (en)
IT (1) IT1160423B (en)

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JPS6047104B2 (en) * 1979-05-17 1985-10-19 Toray Industries
JPS57121650A (en) * 1981-01-19 1982-07-29 Tsudakoma Ind Co Ltd Weft yarn detection in water jet type loom
GB8315164D0 (en) * 1983-06-02 1983-07-06 Redland Technology Ltd Boards
US4596736A (en) * 1984-06-04 1986-06-24 The Dow Chemical Company Fiber-reinforced resinous sheet
JPH0465854B2 (en) * 1984-08-02 1992-10-21 Idemitsu Sekyu Kagaku Kk
JPH0692148B2 (en) * 1987-01-27 1994-11-16 出光石油化学株式会社 Composite resin material
JP2006218468A (en) * 2005-02-09 2006-08-24 Technica Machinery Kk Bag tearing machine
DE102012204345A1 (en) * 2012-03-19 2013-09-19 Sgl Carbon Se A belt-shaped fiber-reinforced composite material and a method for producing the same
FR3064524B1 (en) * 2017-04-03 2019-04-05 Coriolis Group METHOD AND PRODUCTION OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL PARTS FROM NEEDLE PREFORMS IN THE PRESENCE OF LUBRICATING AGENT
WO2020085079A1 (en) * 2018-10-24 2020-04-30 東レ株式会社 Fiber-reinforced resin molding material and method for manufacturing molded article

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CA1013624A (en) * 1972-02-25 1977-07-12 Fred H. Ancker Calendering of laminated polymeric materials
US3765998A (en) * 1971-01-11 1973-10-16 Allied Chem Shapable fiber-reinforced low molecular weight polyethylene terephthalate
DE2312816C3 (en) * 1973-03-15 1983-02-03 Basf Ag, 6700 Ludwigshafen, De

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GB2073658A (en) 1981-10-21
IT1160423B (en) 1987-03-11
IT7868689D0 (en) 1978-07-17
JPS6054183B2 (en) 1985-11-29
GB2001282A (en) 1979-01-31
FR2397938B1 (en) 1983-07-22
DE2831363A1 (en) 1979-02-08
FR2397938A1 (en) 1979-02-16
JPS5421476A (en) 1979-02-17
GB2073658B (en) 1982-09-08
GB2001282B (en) 1982-07-21
CA1132325A1 (en)

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