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Proteinaceous food product

Info

Publication number
CA1043152A
CA1043152A CA 211512 CA211512A CA1043152A CA 1043152 A CA1043152 A CA 1043152A CA 211512 CA211512 CA 211512 CA 211512 A CA211512 A CA 211512A CA 1043152 A CA1043152 A CA 1043152A
Authority
CA
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
material
curd
fermented
product
milk
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired
Application number
CA 211512
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Ian E. Burrows
Peter A. Cheney
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Mars Ltd
Original Assignee
Mars Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23CDAIRY PRODUCTS, e.g. MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE; MILK OR CHEESE SUBSTITUTES; MAKING THEREOF
    • A23C20/00Cheese substitutes
    • A23C20/02Cheese substitutes containing neither milk components, nor caseinate, nor lactose, as sources of fats, proteins or carbohydrates
    • A23C20/025Cheese substitutes containing neither milk components, nor caseinate, nor lactose, as sources of fats, proteins or carbohydrates mainly containing proteins from pulses or oilseeds, e.g. soy curd, tofu
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23CDAIRY PRODUCTS, e.g. MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE; MILK OR CHEESE SUBSTITUTES; MAKING THEREOF
    • A23C19/00Cheese; Cheese preparations; Making thereof
    • A23C19/02Making cheese curd
    • A23C19/055Addition of non-milk fats or non-milk proteins, polyol fatty acid polyesters or mineral oils
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23CDAIRY PRODUCTS, e.g. MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE; MILK OR CHEESE SUBSTITUTES; MAKING THEREOF
    • A23C20/00Cheese substitutes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23JPROTEIN COMPOSITIONS FOR FOODSTUFFS; WORKING-UP PROTEINS FOR FOODSTUFFS; PHOSPHATIDE COMPOSITIONS FOR FOODSTUFFS
    • A23J3/00Working-up of proteins for foodstuffs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23JPROTEIN COMPOSITIONS FOR FOODSTUFFS; WORKING-UP PROTEINS FOR FOODSTUFFS; PHOSPHATIDE COMPOSITIONS FOR FOODSTUFFS
    • A23J3/00Working-up of proteins for foodstuffs
    • A23J3/30Working-up of proteins for foodstuffs by hydrolysis
    • A23J3/32Working-up of proteins for foodstuffs by hydrolysis using chemical agents
    • A23J3/34Working-up of proteins for foodstuffs by hydrolysis using chemical agents using enzymes
    • A23J3/341Working-up of proteins for foodstuffs by hydrolysis using chemical agents using enzymes of animal proteins
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23KFODDER
    • A23K10/00Animal feeding-stuffs
    • A23K10/10Animal feeding-stuffs obtained by microbiological or biochemical processes
    • A23K10/16Addition of microorganisms or extracts thereof, e.g. single-cell proteins, to feeding-stuff compositions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23KFODDER
    • A23K40/00Shaping or working-up of animal feeding-stuffs
    • A23K40/20Shaping or working-up of animal feeding-stuffs by moulding, e.g. making cakes or briquettes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23KFODDER
    • A23K50/00Feeding-stuffs specially adapted for particular animals
    • A23K50/40Feeding-stuffs specially adapted for particular animals for carnivorous animals, e.g. cats or dogs
    • A23K50/45Semi-moist feed
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23VINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO FOODS, FOODSTUFFS OR NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
    • A23V2002/00Food compositions, function of food ingredients or processes for food or foodstuffs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S426/00Food or edible material: processes, compositions, and products
    • Y10S426/805Pet food for dog, cat, bird, or fish

Abstract

ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE

A novel, protein-rich food product, especially suitable for domestic animals, is made by subjecting protein material such as meats or fish to acid-producing fermentation, and preferably also to autolysis or proteolysic, and adding the acidic fermented material to a colloidal solution of protein, such as milk or soya milk, whereupon the disposed protein is precipitated and forms a curd that entraps and binds the particles of fermented material. The curd and entrapped material are separated off and compacted into a coherent mass. The product, which is a compacted mass of the precipitated protein with particles of the fermented material distributed through it, can have the consistency of a cheese and may be formed into "cheese" shapes. The flavour of the product is influenced by the nature of the fermented material.

Description

1043~52 The present invention relates to the preparation of a proteinaceous food product.
In the traditional production of cheese, rennet is added to milk to destroy the colloid stabilizing property of the casein by enzymatic action, whereupon the curd separates and is collected and compacted. Cottage cheese, ~ however, is obtained as a result of the lactic fermentation `I of milk, the colloidal suspension breaking down, with separation of curd, under the action of acid produced in the milk.
~he proteinaceous food product produced in accordance with this invention comprises a compacted mass of acid-precipitated protein or curd fortified with particles of other proteinaceous material distributed and embedded in the mass.
Where the other proteinaceous material has a distinct flavour ~ - or aroma, the product of this invention ma~ be flavoured or ; aromatized accordingly. The product of this invention is anovel food product of high-protein content. It may have a consistency similar to that of cheese and, if desired, may be formed into conventional "cheese" shapes. It is of especial nterest in feeding domestic animals.
In accordance with this invention, a fermentable proteinaceous material is subjected to acid-producing ~, fermentation, the fermented material i~ added to a colloida solution of a binder protein such that the binder protein is precipitated by the acid in the form of a curd that entraps and binds the fermented material, and the curd and . . .

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entrapped ma.terial are separated off and pressed into a compact mass. The proteinaceous material is preferably also subjected to autolysis or to proteolysis by added proteolytic enzymes or micro-organisms whereby the fermented material has a liquid or semi-liquid consistency ~hen it is added to the colloidal solution of the binder protein. Proteolytic enzymes can be obtained from animal, plant or vegetable sources. Mixtures of enzymes can also be used.
l In the preferred process, autolysis should accompany t 10 fermentation but, where proteolysis is conducted through the use of proteolytic enzymes from an exogenous source, other conditions may apply. Thus, in the case of alkaline or neutral proteases the preferred system allows proteolysis to proceed for up to four hours prior to initiating fermentation.
When raw meats, fish or other protein material are used then obviously the autolytic enzymes would contribute some activity during this period. Acid proteases will normally work during the fermentation as for optimum activity they depend upon the lower p~ which de~elops during fermentation.
In certain cases it may be desirable to heat sterilize the ~aterials before fermentation. In such circumstances, autolysis would be unable to proceed due to denaturation of the enzyme systems and exogenous enzymes must be added if proteolysis is to be brought about.
~he preferred binder protein is milk protein~ and ~he formation of the curd can be brought about simply by adding the acid fermented material directly to milk or an aqueous ......

1~43~52 dispersion of milk powder. Other binder proteins, either animal or vegetable in origin, that can conveniently be prepared in colloidal solution and precipitated by acid may, i however, be used. Examples of alternative binder protein solutions include blood and the extract of soy bean known as "soya milk". ~he proteinaceous material to be fermented is preferably animal tissue protein, for example meat, fish or offal, or a mixture of materials. It may be raw, chllled or ,' rrozen.
~he product may also contain colouring matters, added vitamins, mineral supplements, anti-oxidants and binding systems such as gellable hydrophilic colloids or coagulable proteins, to confer stiffness or gel properties. It nay also contain an anti-mycotic such as a sorbic acid compound, for example potassium sorbate. Since certain micro-organisms can metabolize sorbate, it may be necessary to adjust the concer-tration of sorbate in the fermenting material to ensure that the desired final level of sorbate is achieved in the product.
~he preferred analysis of the product by weight is:
15-5C% and more especially about 30% protein, 3-40% and especially about 15% car~ohydrate, 2-12% and especially about 5% fat and 25-60~o and especially about 50% moisture. r~he product preferably contains 0.2-0.8%~ especially about 0.5%
antimycotic and may have an ash analysis of 1.0-2.2%. A
typical analysis of a preferred product according to the invention is: moisture - 50~o; protein - 2~/o; fat - 4.75%;
ash - 1.80C/o; carbGhydrate - 14.0%; potassium sorbate ~ 0.45%.

1~43~SZ
The fermentation by acid-producing micro-organisms is preferably continued until the pH of the material is lowered to within the range 3.6-4.5, especially such that the final product has a pH in the approximate range 4.0-6Ø
In the preferred method of this invention the proteinaceous starting materials are cor~minuted, usually by mincing through a 1.0-2.0 cm plate. Other methods of co~minu~
tion, e.g. chopping or cubing, can be used. Desirable fermentation additives such as fermentable carbohydrate and ,.
organic acid may be added, and antimycotic may also be added at this stage. ~or example, 1~/o of a fermentable carbohydrate such as glucose, 0.5% of potassium sorbate and O.~/o citric acid based upon the weight of proteinaceous starting materials ¦ may be added and mixed in well. The mixture is inoculated with a starter culture of lactic acid producing bacteria, e.g.
~. casei or S. lactis, and the mixture incubated at 30C.
until the pH of the system reaches 4Ø The temperature may be varied depending upon the strain or species of micro-organism used.
As previously stated, in the case of raw undenatured proteinaceous starting materials, autolysis may be allowed to proceed during fermentation. When protease enzy~es of exo-genous origin are used they should be added directly after comminution. The enzyme or mixture of enzymes and the protein~
1 25 aceous materials are then incubated for the optimum period of time, i.e. one to two hours at the optimum temperature for enzyme activity. ~hen proteolysis has proceeded to a .,, , . ' ~ . ' sufficient degree the carbo'nydrate, potassium sorbate and citric acid may be mixed in. The mixture is cooled to 30C and inoculated with viable lactic acid producing bacteria. Further incubation then takes place and the mixture allowed to ferment until the pH of the slurry falls to about 4Ø After incubation, the material is added ~ slowly with agitation to a colloidal solution of milk solids, ! for example pasteurized milk or a solution of spray dried skim milk.
After complete addition of the fermented material the curd is allowed to separate and the whey and residual liquor from the proteinaceous material ferment is removed. ~he curd is then pressed and drained and can then be stored in a conventional manner.
The following are examples of the practice of this invention:
_xample 1 A fermented autolysed sprat slurry was prepared by first comminuting 1,000 parts by weight of raw deep frozen sprats by passage through a mincer fitted with a 1.0 cm platP.
100 parts by weight of lactose, 6 parts by weight Gf potassium sorbate and 0.2 parts by weight of citric acid were ¦ added and mixed well in. 110 parts by weight of a 24 log hour ¦ - old culture of ~actobacillus ~actis were added and mixed well in. ~`he whole mixture was incubated at 37C until the pX o~
the mixture reached 4Ø During this time autolysis took place and a fluid slurry was produced.

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.. . ..
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1~343~L52 Thirt~ parts by weight of this fermented and autolysed sprat slurry were added slowly with stirring to ? parts by weight of 2~o spray-dried skim milk solution held at 45C. During the course of the addition the pH of the milk was reduced by the lactic acid in the fermented fish and as the milk proteins precipitated a curd was formed ¦ which contained the solid components and some of the liquors of the added fish. The fish contained o.50~0 potassium sorbate, but if necessary the conc,entration should be adjusted prior to addition of the acidified or low pH
component. Gentle mixing by a slowly revolving magnetic follower was provided during the addition to ensure adequate mixing of the components without homogenization of the curd.
Th~ mixture was allowed to cool to ambient temperature and the liquors drained from the curd by decantation. ~he very moist and soft curd was then subjected to slow vacuum filtration until as much water and liquors as possible had been removed in this wayO
The curd was then removed from the vessel, and packaged or wrapped in a conventional way prior to storing at sub-ambient te~perature.
~he product had a texture similar to Cheddar cheese, a pH of 4.5-5.0 and a pleasant fishy aroma.
Exam~le 2 A fermented fish slurry was prepared as described in ~xa~pie 1, except that ~. casei was used instead of L. Lactis, lactose was used as tne carbohydrate and the incubation -- ,, .... . , . . . .. , . . , . _ . ., .. .. . . _ ., .

lC~43~5Z
temperature ~as 30~C.
A curd was produced as in Example 1 but using 65 parts by weight of milk and 20 parts of the fermented fish. During curd formation 15 parts by weight of meat chunks or meat analogue chunks approximately 1 cm x 1 cm were added and ~ uniformly dispersed within the forming curd.
j ~he curd was separated and treated as described in Example 1.
The texture was similar to that of Cheddar cheese but .
of attractive a~pearance due to the lumps of meat or meat analogue visible on slicing the curd with a knife. ~he pH was about 5.0 and the product had a very pleasant odour.
Example 3 A fermented sprat slurry was produced as described in Example 1, except that _. casei was used, with "~rudex"~as the fermentable carbohydrate and an incubation temperature of ~0C.
Forty parts by weight of the fermented and autolysed sprats, pH 4.0, were added slowly to 60 parts of a 2~o solution of spray dried skim milk at 45C. Gentle agitation of the mixture was provided during the addition. On complete addition of the fermented fish the formed curd was allowed to separate prior to removal of the whey and fish liquors. ~he curd was then pressed and allowed to drain for 24 hours before being stored in a conventional manner at 4C.
~he product had a Cheddar cheese like consistency, a pX of 4.5-5.0, and a faintly fishy aroma.
' - : . , :
. :

1~4315Z
Example 4 - A fermented autolysed meat slurry was prepared from I equal parts of beef lung, heart, liver and tripe, the materials ! being fermented as described in Example 2.
I 5 10 parts by weight of the autolysed meat slurry were ¦ added slowly with gentle agitation to 90 parts by weight of a solution of spray dried skimmed milk powder in water.
4 parts by weight of potassium sorbate were added during mixing.
Once the curd had formed the agitation was stopped and the temperature of the mixture raised slowly to 55C. The whey was allowed to drain away from the curd during the process.
When the bulk of the whey had been removed the curd was broken and transferred to a press and compacted in the - usual manner.
The product possessed a desirable Cheddar cheese like texture and the aroma of cooked liver. It had a pH of 4.2 and was highly acceptable to pet animals. Discrete ch~lnks of the less autolytic meats were visible throughout the product.
Example 5 A fermented tripe slurry was prep~red using the pro-cedure described in ~xa~ple 2 except that the initially frozen tripe was thawed prior to comminution in a bowl chopper.
After fermentation discrete pieces of tripe were obvious in the slurry.
20 parts by weight of the fermented tripe were added slowly with agitaticn to 80 parts by weight of a ?~b solution _9_ .
.

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.

1~43~5Z
of spray dried skimmed milk powder containing 4 parts by weight of potassium sorbate. On precipitation of the curd, the same procedure was followed as described in ~xample 4 above.
Example 6 "Soya milk" was prepared by a conventional method, as I follo~rs.
¦ 10 parts by weight of soya beans were ground and added ¦ to 100 parts by weight of water. ~he pH was r~ised to 9.0 "I .
and the mixture homogenized and held for one hour. ~he solution was then clarified by passage through a centrifuge, the clarified extract being used as soya milk.
~he procedure followed to cause precipitation of the protein was exactly the same as that described for ordinary milk, e~g. as described in Example 4.

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Claims (9)

THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION IN WHICH AN EXCLUSIVE
PROPERTY OR PRIVILEGE IS CLAIMED ARE DEFINED AS FOLLOWS:
1. A method of making a proteinaceous food product comprising the steps of:
subjecting a proteinaceous material to acid-producing fermentation;
adding the fermented material to a colloidal solution of a further pro-tein and thereby precipitating said further protein by the acid in the form of a curd that entraps and binds the fermented material;
separating off said curd and entrapped material;
and pressing the separated material into a compact mass.
2. A method according to claim 1 including the further step of:
subjecting said proteinaceous material to autolysis or proteolysis together with said fermentation and thereby reducing said fermented material to an at least partially liquid consistency.
3. A method according to claim 1 wherein said fermentation is contained until said fermented material has a pH value of at most about 4.
4. A method according to claim 1 wherein said fermented material is added to a colloidal aqueous solution of milk solids.
5. A proteinaceous food product comprising: a compacted mass of acid-precipitated proteinaceous curd; and particles of other proteinaceous material distributed and embedded in and bonded together by said mass of precipitated protein or curd, whenever prepared by the method claimed in claim 1, or by an obvious chemical equivalent thereof.
6. A food product according to claim 5 wherein said proteinaceous curd comprises milk solids, whenever prepared by the method claimed in claim 4, or by an obvious chemical equivalent thereof.
7. A food product according to claim 5 wherein said particles comprise particles of fermented proteinaceous material, whenever prepared by the method claimed in claim 1 or 2, or by an obvious chemical equivalent thereof.
8. A food product according to claim 5 comprising by weight from 15 to 50% protein, from 2 to 12% fat, from 3 to 40% carbohydrate and about 25 to 60%
moisture, whenever prepared by the method claimed in claim 1 or 2, or by an obvious chemical equivalent thereof.
9. A food product according to claim 5 having a pH value in the approxi-mate range 4.0-6.0, whenever prepared by the method claimed in claim 1 or 2, or by an obvious chemical equivalent thereof.
CA 211512 1973-10-18 1974-10-16 Proteinaceous food product Expired CA1043152A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB4866573A GB1484264A (en) 1973-10-18 1973-10-18 Proteinaceous food product

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
CA1043152A true CA1043152A (en) 1978-11-28

Family

ID=10449468

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
CA 211512 Expired CA1043152A (en) 1973-10-18 1974-10-16 Proteinaceous food product

Country Status (11)

Country Link
US (1) US4016295A (en)
JP (1) JPS5721966B2 (en)
BE (1) BE821211A (en)
CA (1) CA1043152A (en)
DE (1) DE2449160C2 (en)
DK (1) DK146553C (en)
ES (1) ES431132A1 (en)
FR (1) FR2247983B1 (en)
GB (1) GB1484264A (en)
LU (1) LU71114A1 (en)
NL (1) NL180972C (en)

Families Citing this family (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4294856A (en) * 1977-01-04 1981-10-13 Tokai Regional Fisheries Research Laboratory Process for manufacture of artificial milk replacer for raising infant pigs and other infant animals
US4288458A (en) * 1978-05-01 1981-09-08 Bp Nutrition (Uk) Limited Fish silage
US4216693A (en) * 1978-06-20 1980-08-12 The Wurlitzer Company Means for storing bass rhythm patterns
US4214008A (en) * 1979-03-14 1980-07-22 Microlife Technics, Inc. Lactic acid fermentate flavored pet food
US4361586A (en) * 1980-11-12 1982-11-30 Meinke Wilmon W Vacuum enzymatic digestion of protein material
EP0096902B1 (en) * 1982-06-16 1988-09-28 Taiyo Fishery Co., Ltd. Method for the production of protein food products or protein food materials in paste state and method for the production of food products from these materials
JPS59135838A (en) * 1983-01-25 1984-08-04 Tsune Kawahara Preparation of soybean cheese
JPH0461616B2 (en) * 1983-10-04 1992-10-01 Taiyo Oil & Fat Mfg
US4771001A (en) * 1986-03-27 1988-09-13 Neurex Corp. Production of lactic acid by continuous fermentation using an inexpensive raw material and a simplified method of lactic acid purification
US4698303A (en) * 1985-02-15 1987-10-06 Engenics, Inc. Production of lactic acid by continuous fermentation using an inexpensive raw material and a simplified method of lactic acid purification
FI863009A (en) * 1986-07-22 1988-01-23 Yves Gerard Andre Delatte Foder Science foerfarande Foer framstaellning of the same is.
JPH0255015B2 (en) * 1986-10-23 1990-11-26 Hokkaido
US4822626A (en) * 1987-01-05 1989-04-18 Nabisco Brands, Inc. Coated canine biscuits
JPS63196243A (en) * 1987-02-09 1988-08-15 Hiroyuki Hamano Flake of meat and production thereof
DE4336050C2 (en) * 1993-10-22 1995-11-16 Onken Gmbh Animal feed, especially food for cats and dogs
GB0103879D0 (en) * 2001-02-16 2001-04-04 Mars Uk Ltd Foodstuff
US6800309B2 (en) * 2002-07-03 2004-10-05 Ariake Japan Co. Broth/stock and methods for preparation thereof
US7037541B2 (en) * 2002-07-03 2006-05-02 Ariake Japan Co. Alcoholic beverages derived from animal extract, and methods for the production thereof
US6723356B2 (en) * 2002-07-03 2004-04-20 Ariake Japan Co. High quality fermented bouillon, and method for production thereof
US6793948B2 (en) * 2002-07-03 2004-09-21 Ariake Japan Co. High quality dried bouillon and methods for preparation thereof
US20060263415A1 (en) 2005-05-05 2006-11-23 Sensient Flavors Inc. Production of beta-glucans and mannans
JP5885137B2 (en) * 2011-09-02 2016-03-15 地方独立行政法人山口県産業技術センター Method for producing a cheese-like food
US20140271994A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Richard Baird Smittle Meat slurry culture

Family Cites Families (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE697440C (en) * 1939-02-05 1940-10-14 Johannes Paessler A process for obtaining a mixture of curd and lecithin
US2560621A (en) * 1949-03-02 1951-07-17 Charlton L Wrenshall Meat substitute and process of making same
DE858499C (en) * 1949-06-10 1952-12-08 Karl Eisenhuth A process for the production of cheese preparations
US2986469A (en) * 1958-07-17 1961-05-30 Kruss Johannes Method for producing feed
US3041174A (en) * 1959-01-27 1962-06-26 Messrs As Lumino Feed Company Process for treating oil-containing animal material, such as fish and fish offal
NL6605933A (en) * 1966-05-03 1967-11-06
GB1380394A (en) * 1971-04-20 1975-01-15 Pedigree Petfoods Ltd Food product

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
NL180972C (en) 1987-06-01 grant
GB1484264A (en) 1977-09-01 application
DK541774A (en) 1975-06-16 application
LU71114A1 (en) 1975-04-17 application
DK146553B (en) 1983-11-07 grant
NL7413733A (en) 1975-04-22 application
JPS5070542A (en) 1975-06-12 application
BE821211A (en) 1975-02-17 grant
US4016295A (en) 1977-04-05 grant
ES431132A1 (en) 1976-11-01 application
FR2247983B1 (en) 1981-08-21 grant
DE2449160C2 (en) 1989-06-08 grant
CA1043152A1 (en) grant
DE2449160A1 (en) 1975-04-24 application
BE821211A1 (en) grant
FR2247983A1 (en) 1975-05-16 application
DK146553C (en) 1984-04-16 grant
JPS5721966B2 (en) 1982-05-11 grant
JP1133688C (en) grant

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