BE1014011A3 - System for the trading of gems. - Google Patents

System for the trading of gems. Download PDF

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Publication number
BE1014011A3
BE1014011A3 BE200000693A BE200000693A BE1014011A3 BE 1014011 A3 BE1014011 A3 BE 1014011A3 BE 200000693 A BE200000693 A BE 200000693A BE 200000693 A BE200000693 A BE 200000693A BE 1014011 A3 BE1014011 A3 BE 1014011A3
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BE
Belgium
Prior art keywords
gem
image
last
user terminal
rot
Prior art date
Application number
BE200000693A
Other languages
French (fr)
Inventor
Ygal Hausman
Goldstein
Original Assignee
Diamond And Jewelry 4 U Ltd
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Publication date
Priority to IL13264899 priority Critical
Priority to IL13264899 priority
Priority to IL13466400 priority
Priority to IL13466400A priority patent/IL134664D0/en
Application filed by Diamond And Jewelry 4 U Ltd filed Critical Diamond And Jewelry 4 U Ltd
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of BE1014011A3 publication Critical patent/BE1014011A3/en

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/02Marketing, e.g. market research and analysis, surveying, promotions, advertising, buyer profiling, customer management or rewards; Price estimation or determination
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01NINVESTIGATING OR ANALYSING MATERIALS BY DETERMINING THEIR CHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
    • G01N21/00Investigating or analysing materials by the use of optical means, i.e. using infra-red, visible or ultra-violet light
    • G01N21/84Systems specially adapted for particular applications
    • G01N21/87Investigating jewels
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06TIMAGE DATA PROCESSING OR GENERATION, IN GENERAL
    • G06T3/00Geometric image transformation in the plane of the image
    • G06T3/60Rotation of a whole image or part thereof
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N7/00Television systems
    • H04N7/18Closed circuit television systems, i.e. systems in which the signal is not broadcast
    • H04N7/183Closed circuit television systems, i.e. systems in which the signal is not broadcast for receiving images from a single remote source

Abstract

System for trading in gems, each gem presenting

Description

SYSTEM FOR THE TRADING OF GEMS FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a gem trading system and method, a gem examining apparatus for examining gems, a method of obtaining a pair of complementary digital images, left and right, of an object in view of displaying a stereoscopic image thereof and a method of displaying a continuous moving image of an object on a computer terminal.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The trading of gems in general and diamonds in particular (hereinafter called gems) is based on assessments by trained professionals who carefully study a gem with the naked eye and / or using a magnifying glass of a magnification of 10 or a microscope. A professional evaluation of a gem depends on quantifiable parameters such as its weight, color, clarity in terms of imperfections, polish, size and relative proportions of the different parts of a gem, and also its intrinsic beauty. in terms of shine in the way it reflects light. The proportions of a gem can be calculated from a three-dimensional representation of a gem by a wire lattice, for example as implemented in the digital acquisition systems of calibrated optical images marketed by Ogi Ltd, Israel ; Sarin Ltd, Israel and others. The certification of a gem can be obtained from one or more internationally recognized organizations, for example the Gem Trade

Laboratory of the Gemmological Institute of America. Other certifications may take the form of a "Gem Certificate" as shown and described in US Patent 5,899,503.

Gems are now traded on the Internet on various websites which include www.gemkey.net, www.diamond.net and www.polygon.com. The websites act as virtual marketplaces and manage inventories of gems for sale, which contain details of the parameters mentioned above for each gem as well as the asking price per carat. In addition, gems with similar specifications can be sold in batches. A prospective buyer of a gem can view an inventory by specifying search parameters, such as carats, asking price per carat, and the like. Assuming that the inventory gives one or more gems or lots of gems that meet his search criteria, these gems and / or these lots are presented to the buyer. The buyer then enters a purchase order for one or more of the items that interest him, which are then sent to him for evaluation and which are returned to the seller if the buyer cannot reach an agreement with him. So while gem trading has been streamlined to some extent, there is still a large unwanted movement of inventory, which could be avoided if a prospective buyer of a gem or lot of gems could verify remotely and regardless of a seller's assessment of a gem and in particular its market value.

Registration marks are currently inscribed on the gems for identification purposes. The most common type of registration mark consists of letters and numbers consisting of a series of light-scattering segments located at a distance from each other on one of the polished flat surfaces of a gem, and typically its table (table) or its crown (peripheral edge). This type of marking uses segments of 0.5 µm in height and has a length of about 50 µm, so as to be invisible to the naked eye, so as not to affect the beauty of a gem. Detecting a gem registration mark requires enlarging at least 200 and scanning the entire table or crown of a gem and is a time-consuming and tedious operation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Gem trading involves transactions between "the seller of a gem" and "the prospective buyer of a gem", but due to the nature of gem trading, the seller of a transaction may be the buyer possible from another transaction. Consequently, the present description uses the specific terms “the seller of a gem” and “the eventual buyer of a gem”, and sometimes the generic term “the user” according to what is best suited in the context of the description. In addition, the present description relates only to trading in individual gems, but it should be understood that the present invention also applies to the trading of lots of similar gems. Likewise, the present description relates to the trade in so-called circular cut gems, but it should be understood that the present invention also applies to the trade in gems of other shapes.

In accordance with a first aspect of the present invention, a system for the trading of gems is provided, each gem having a flat table (table) defining a longitudinal axis perpendicular to this face, a peripheral edge (crown), a flag and a base, the system comprising a plurality of user terminals for capturing living colored digital images of a gem, each of said user terminals being capable of creating the same standard portfolio of living colored digital images of a particular gem, thus allowing a prospective buyer to independently assess its market value in accordance with internationally recognized standards.

In a second aspect of the present invention there is provided a method of trading in gems, the method comprising the steps of: (a) providing a data storage device containing a plurality of portfolios of living digital images in gem color , which each allow a prospective buyer of a gem to independently assess its market value from the portfolio of associated images, in accordance with internationally recognized standards; and (b) allow one or more potential buyers of gems remote access to the data storage device, thereby enabling a potential buyer of a gem to carefully study the image portfolio of a particular gem that 'he plans to buy.

The system and method for trading gems in accordance with the present invention necessarily includes the creation of a standardized portfolio of live digital color images of a particular gem, which allows a prospective buyer of a gem of a part to independently determine its quantifiable parameters recognized in trading, and secondly to appreciate its beauty to assess its value on the market as if it were physically studying the gem itself. The need for each of the system's user terminals to create essentially identical portfolios for the same gem is essential for trading gems, otherwise prospective buyers will not be able to implicitly rely on a portfolio when considering '' buy a particular gem. The system and method according to the present invention can be implemented either on a server-based intranet or on a "business-to-business" website managing an inventory of portfolios of gem images for sale. In both implementations, a prospective buyer can preferably conduct a telephone conversation with a seller of a gem to invite him to show him online specific views of a gem that he is interested in buying.

The creation of images of a gem is made particularly difficult by the fact that its highly polished surfaces reflect light in such a way that its interior is hidden, for example, as in photographs for advertising purposes which accentuate the beauty of a gem but do not reveal its imperfections. On the other hand, photographs of imperfections in a gem are normally "dead" in the sense that they are devoid of any indication of the beauty of the gem, for example as that which can be obtained by an examination apparatus of gems shown and described in US Patent 4,906,083 issued to Sattler, which uses dark field lighting or polarized filters. The present invention overcomes the difficulties of creating images of a gem on the one hand by effectively protecting a gem from ambient light which would otherwise cause two user terminals to create two different image portfolios according to their local environment, and on the other hand, by "bathing" a gem in a diffused artificial white light, in a balanced way such that the captured images are neither too bright nor too dead. In addition, at least some of the images are so-called "floating" images in a uniform background and lighting, and do not include a detectable outline of a transparent gem specimen holder used to mount a gem during capture images of the latter.

A portfolio of living digital color images of gems includes one or more still images of its table, crown and the like, and also preferably includes one or more moving images of the surface of a gem, images for display a stereoscopic image of a gem using any of the systems available on the market, for example the Simuleyer ™ stereoscopic viewing system available from Neotek Inc., a three-dimensional representation of a gem visible in a three-dimensional viewing space in a manner similar to that described in US Patent 5,793,372, the image of the registration mark of a gem and a "Gem Certificate" comprising at least one representation of the gem with its imperfections indicated for evaluation by a potential buyer. The moving images can include one or more of the following images. First, a so-called tilting image of the surface of a gem, which can be its table, its crown or its flag. Next, a rotating image of the surface of a gem, which can be that of its table or pavilion. And finally, an image that can be moved in a precession type movement of the table of a gem when the gem undergoes a superimposed combination of the displacements of the so-called tilting image of its table and the rotation of the gem around its axis. longitudinal. The moving images can be real video streams or series of computer-animated images, created in real time on the prospective purchaser's computer terminal from bitmap information loaded on this terminal. Moving images of a gem are important complements to still images, because they allow a better perception of the location and depth of an imperfection in a gem, and in addition they can reveal imperfections that would otherwise be hidden behind the surface of a gem that blindly reflects light. The images can also be processed manually by a seller to understand areas of interest ("Areas of Interest - AOI") graphically indicating replacement of imperfections in a gem to facilitate detection of these by the prospective buyer, improving thus the accuracy of its assessment of the value of the gem on the market. The images of a gem and in particular those which include AOI can be easily incorporated into a "Gem Certificate" issued by an internationally recognized body, for example the Gem Trade Laboratory mentioned above. Also, one or more of the images may include a color diagram to aid in the determination of the color of a gem by a prospective buyer.

In yet another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method of displaying a continuously moving visual image of a gem on a computer terminal located remote from a database, the method comprising the steps comprising: (a) uploading bitmap information about a gem from the database to the computer terminal; (b) create from the bitmap information loaded on the computer terminal a computer image animated in real time of the gem from a particular observation line directed towards the gem; and (c) update the animated computer image of the gem from different lines of sight directed towards the gem, according to the indications that the prospective buyer of the gem provides on his computer terminal, so as to present a series of animated images of the gem perceived by the prospective buyer as continuously moving visual images.

The method according to the present invention, of presenting a continuously moving visual image of a gem on the computer terminal of a prospective buyer overcomes the problems of delay and bandwidth posed for example by the transmission of video streams on the Internet. The continuously moving visual image may be that of a particular surface of a gem, such as its table, or alternatively may be a three-dimensional representation of a gem. The continuously moving visual image of a gem table can be a tilting image, a rotating image, or a moving image in a precession type movement.

In the case of a tiltable image of the surface of a gem, each computer-animated image In presented on the computer terminal of a prospective buyer is constructed in accordance with the relation l (n) = pl (first) + (1-p) l (last), with 0 <p <1, l (first) and l (last) being respectively the first and the last digital still image of the surface of the gem, the longitudinal axis of the gem defining a first direction when capturing the first still image and a last direction when capturing the last still image, so that the two directions define a plane between them and intersect at an acute angle.

In the case of a rotating image of the surface of a gem, each computer-animated image l (rot) presented on the computer terminal of a prospective buyer is constructed in accordance with the relationship: l (rot) with pixel coordinates (i, j): i (rot) = icosG - jsinG j (rot) - isinG + jcosG

In the case of a continuously moving visual image in a precession type movement of the surface of a gem, each computer-animated image l (z) presented on the computer terminal of a prospective buyer is constructed in agreement with the relation l (z) = pl (rot (first)) + (lp) l (rot (last)), with 0 <p <1, l (first) and l (last) being respectively the first and the last digital still image of the surface of the gem, the longitudinal axis of the gem defining a first direction when capturing the first still image and a last direction when capturing the last still image, so that the two directions define a plane between them and intersect at an acute angle <j>, and l (rot) with pixel coordinates (i, j): i (rot) = icosG - jsinG j (rot) = isinG + jcosG

In the case of three-dimensional representations of a gem visible in a three-dimensional display space, each animated image created by the computer and presented on the computer terminal of the prospective buyer is constructed by displaying on the computer terminal a representation of the gem in a lattice of wire, in agreement with a particular line of observation directed towards the gem and then texturing separately each of the facets of the representation in agreement with the relation: F (i) = Ip (j) F ( ij), with Zp (j) 2 = 1 for j = 1 with n different textures of the same facet F (i), each taken along a different line of observation in agreement with a particular line of observation directed towards the gem , and the p (j) are the cosines that form the direction of the line of observation in a predefined Cartesian coordinate system.

In yet another aspect of the present invention, there is provided a method of obtaining two complementary still digital images, left and right, of a gem, for use in displaying a stereoscopic image of the latter, the method comprising the steps of: (a) mounting a gem in the field of vision of a digital image acquisition device; (b) acquire a left image of the gem; (c) moving the gem within the field of vision of the image acquisition device; and (d) acquire a straight image of the gem.

A binocular microscope, for example that shown and described in US Pat. No. 4,906,083 mentioned above allows a user to naturally perceive a stereoscopic image of a gem. Similarly, two image acquisition devices can be used to acquire left and right epipolar still images of a gem, these images being essential to exclude obtaining a fuzzy stereoscopic image. The method according to the present invention for obtaining two complementary images, left and right, eliminates the need for a pair of digital image acquisition devices and can be easily performed using the gem imaging device according to the present invention. The displacement of the gem within the field of vision of the image acquisition device can be a rectilinear displacement over a distance essentially equal to the spacing between the eyepieces of a binocular microscope, or the gem can be displaced along a curved line between two extreme positions equidistant from the optical axis of the image acquisition device, and in which the longitudinal axis of the gem defines two directions which define a plane and form an acute angle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

To understand the invention and see how it can be implemented in practice, preferred embodiments will now be described only by way of nonlimiting examples, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which similar parts are numbered with the same manner, and in which: Figure 1 is an image representation showing an Internet-based system for trading in gems in accordance with the present invention; Figure 2 is an image representation showing a user terminal of the system of Figure 1, which includes a gem imaging device and a computer viewing station; Figure 3 is an exploded image representation showing the gem imaging device of Figure 2; Figure 4 is a cross-sectional graphical representation showing the gem imaging device of Figure 2 along line 1V-IV; FIGS. 5A and 5B are graphic representations showing two positions of a gem-carrying carriage carrying a first type of specimen holder for gem; Figure 6 is a longitudinal sectional graphical representation of the first type of the gem specimen holder along the line VI-VI of Figure 5A; Fig. 7A is a graphical representation showing the first type of gem specimen holder on which a gem is mounted with its table at the top; FIG. 7B is a graphic representation showing a floating image of a size close to the full screen of the table of a gem as entered by the user terminal when the gem is mounted as shown in FIG. 7A; Fig. 8A is a graphical representation showing the first type of gem specimen holder on which a gem is mounted with its base at the top; FIG. 8B is a graphic representation showing a floating image of a size close to the full screen of the base of the gem entered by the user terminal when the gem is mounted as shown in FIG. 8A; Fig. 9A is a graphical representation showing the first type of gem specimen holder on which a gem is mounted with its flag at the top; FIG. 9B is a graphic representation showing a floating image of a size close to the full screen of the pavilion of the gem, as captured by the user terminal when the gem is mounted as shown in FIG. 9A; FIG. 10A is a lateral graphical representation showing the first type of specimen holder for gem on which a gem is mounted with opposite parts of its crown located one at the top and the other at the bottom; FIG. 10B is a graphical representation showing a floating image of a size close to the full screen of the crown of the gem as captured by the user terminal when the gem is mounted as shown in FIG. 10A; FIGS. 11A and 11B are graphic representations showing a second type of specimen holder for a gem, in order to allow the capture of a rotating image of the table of a gem; FIG. 12 is a graphic representation showing the second type of specimen holder for a gem in order to allow the capture of a rotating image of the pavilion of a gem; FIG. 13 is a graphic representation showing a third type of specimen holder for a gem in order to allow the capture of an image of the registration mark of the gem inscribed on its table; FIG. 14 is a graphic representation showing a close-up view of the elimination of the table from a gem and its image; FIG. 15 is a graphical representation showing the scanning of the surface of the gem in order to locate the registration mark inscribed thereon; FIG. 16 is a graphic representation showing a fourth type of specimen holder for a gem in order to allow the capture of an image of the registration mark of the gem inscribed on its crown; Figure 17A is a graphical representation showing a fifth type of gem specimen holder for capturing an image to create a three-dimensional lattice representation of a stone; Figure 17B is a view from the top of the gem specimen holder of Figure 17A; FIG. 18 is a graphical representation showing a graphical user interface for the preparation of a pair of complementary still images, left and right, of the table of a gem, with a view to creating a stereoscopic image of the latter for display on a computer viewing station of the system of FIG. 1; Figure 19A is a view from the top of the silhouette of a gem removed from the back; FIG. 19B is a graphic representation of a three-dimensional lattice of wire superimposed on the image of a gem; FIG. 20 is a schematic representation showing the rotational transformation of an image in order to provide visual images rotating continuously and moving in a precessional movement of a gem; Fig. 21 is a graphical representation showing a graphical user interface of a portfolio of living colorful digital images of a gem as viewed by a prospective buyer; and Figure 22 is a graphical representation showing the Gem Certificate of a gem.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

With reference to FIG. 1, a system 1 for internet-based gem trading comprises a website 2 making it possible to manage an inventory of portfolios of gems for sale 3 and a plurality of identical user terminals 4 linked to the website 2 Each user terminal 4 comprises a gem imaging device 6 and a computer viewing station 7 installed with protected client software and a frame capture device to create a standardized portfolio of living colorful digital images of a gem for sale to be incorporated into website inventory. Both a computer viewing station 7 or a standard computer terminal 7A can be used to view the gem portfolios held in website inventory. A computer viewing station 7 and a standard computer terminal are capable of supporting a stereoscopic viewing system making it possible to view stereoscopic images of a gem, represented by two stereoscopic glasses 8 worn by a user, for example the viewing system Stereoscopic Simuleyer ™ available from Neotek Inc. System 1 users can be in voice communication with each other, either by “Voice over IP (VoIP) or by conventional telephony.

If we now refer to FIGS. 2 to 4, a device 6 for imaging gems comprises a base 9 provided with a vertical member 11 intended to support with sliding a CCD camera 12 (which constitutes a digital device for acquiring images) having an optical axis 13 and used to capture images of a gem 14, the gem 14 having a flat table A defining a longitudinal axis T which is perpendicular thereto. The CCD camera 12 slides along the vertical member 11 while approaching and moving away from the base 9 (direction Z) to capture images of gems of different sizes. The largest diameter of the table representation of a gem, the image of which can be captured by the gem imaging device 6 is determined by the field of vision of the CCD camera when the CCD camera 12 is placed at the top of the vertical member 11, and it is about 35 mm.

A support block 16, in the form of an open-ended box, comprises a lower part 17 having a base surface 18 and two opposite vertical side walls 19A and 19B, the base surface 18 being slidably mounted on two rails 21A and 21B (direction Y) spaced from each other thus allowing the lower part 17 to move back and forth relative to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera, over a stroke of approximately + / - 10 millimeters around a central position which corresponds to the maximum size of the representation of the table of a gem whose image can be created. The base surface 18 is traversed by an opening 22 disposed above an annular source 23 of white light and a light diffuser 24. The light source 23 may be a fluorescent light source of 9 Watts or may also be realized in the form of a series of LED light-emitting diodes arranged in a circle.

The side walls 19A and 19B are painted white and are configured with three pairs of opposite grooves, 28, 29 and 31 making it possible to slide a carriage 32 gem carrier. The pairs of grooves are located respectively about 1.5 cm, 2.5 cm and 3.5 cm above the base 9. The lower pair of grooves 28 is used to capture images of gems whose diameter of the table is located in the range of 9 to 19 mm. The intermediate pair of grooves 29 is used to capture gem images whose table diameter is in the range of about 20 to 35 cm. The upper pair of grooves 31 is used to capture images of gems whose table diameter is in the range of 2.5 to 9 mm. Each pair of grooves 28, 29 and 31 is provided with a stop (not shown) against which the carriage 32 abuts when it is completely inserted therein. The side walls of the grooves 28, 29 and 31 are themselves non-reflective.

The lower part 17 of the support block is covered by an upper surface 33 rigidly fixed to the base 9, the upper surface 33 being traversed by an opening 34 and provided with an annular source 36 of white fluorescent light similar to the light source 23 and a light diffuser 37 traversed by an opening 38. The openings 34 and 38 of the upper surface 33 and of the light diffuser 37 and the annular light source 36 are arranged so as to be coaxial with respect to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera, to allow images of a gem to be captured through it.

The support block 16 in the form of an open-ended box has the following internal dimensions: length 6 +/- 15% cm, width 5 +/- 15% cm and height 4 +/- 15% cm, and it includes an arrangement elimination 39 constituted by the light sources 26 and 36 and by their respective light diffuser 24 and 37 and by the reflecting internal surfaces of the side walls 19A and 19B. The support block 16 is adapted on the one hand to essentially protect a gem from ambient light, but without completely excluding the light coming from its interior and, on the other hand, to bathe a gem in a balanced manner in white light diffuse from opposite orthogonal directions, so that you can capture vivid images of a gem that are neither too bright nor too dull. The expression "in a balanced manner" should be understood in the sense that the intensities of the lighting in opposite axial directions are substantially equal, with a tolerance of approximately +/- 10%. Also, since most gems are symmetrical about their longitudinal axis, the intensity of the light coming from the radial direction towards the optical axis of the CCD camera is essentially symmetrically symmetrical around this axis.

If we now refer to FIGS. 5A and 5B, the gem carrier carriage 32 comprises an outer U-shaped frame 41 having two parallel and opposite lateral support members 42 and 43 and a transverse member 44 which extends between the ends adjacent adjacent 42A and 43A of the lateral support members. The free adjacent ends 42B and 43B of the lateral support members are each configured with a slot 46 extending along the length serving to exclude by friction an uncontrolled free movement of the carriage 32 in a pair of grooves 28, 29 or 31. The carriage 32 also includes a pair of parallel and opposite support members 47 which are configured with a pair of grooves 48 for sliding reception of different types of specimen holder 49A for gem, clear, transparent and of the glass slide type (direction X). The support members 47 are rotatably mounted on the inner side of the lateral support members 42 and 43, between a first position in which a specimen holder for gem 49 is canted on the external frame 41 and a second position in which a specimen holder for gem 49 subtends with the outer frame 41 an acute angle a which can be up to about 45 °, for capturing particular fixed and moving images of the surface of a gem, as described further.

Referring now to Figures 6-10, the gem specimen holder 49A with first and second opposing main surfaces 51 and 52 is used to capture the following images of a gem: a still image of his table, a still image of his base, a still image of his pavilion, a still image of his crown, a tilting image of his table, a tilting image of his pavilion and two complementary still images, left and right, of his table , intended to be used to present a stereoscopic image of the precise stone.

The specimen holder for gem 49A is crossed by a cylindrical opening 53 making it possible to releasably receive the base of the gem to mount the gem 14 so that its longitudinal axis T is oriented in the same direction as the optical axis 13 CCD camera, table A at the top. When mounted in this way, the gem 14 can be placed in the field of vision of the CCD camera so that its longitudinal axis T is coaxial with the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera (see FIG. 7A ), thus making it possible to capture an image of a size close to the full screen of table A of the gem (see FIG. 7B). The gem is typically enlarged so that it fills about 90% of the height of the screen. In this case, the image of table A of the gem is accompanied by the following legend: size 1.51 K, color K, clarity VS1 and REMARKS: STONE FLAT, and it includes an AOI 54 which indicates the location of '' an imperfection visible on the image. Represented in this way, the image of table A of the gem is a floating image in the sense that we cannot discern any visible contour there, neither that of the specimen holder for gem 49 nor that of the cylindrical opening 53. In this position, a tilting image of the gem table A can be captured by the cyclical tilt of the gem specimen holder 49A relative to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera, as indicated by the arrow J.

The cylindrical opening 53 can also be used to mount the gem 14 in the opposite direction, so that its longitudinal axis T is oriented in the same direction as the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera and that its base B is at the top (see Figure 8A) to capture a still image of the latter (Figure 8B). When the gem specimen holder 49A is inclined relative to the outer frame 41, the cylindrical opening 53 can also be used to mount the gem 14 so that its longitudinal axis T is disposed transversely to the optical axis 13 CCD camera and its pavilion C is located at the top (see Figure 9A), thus allowing to capture a still image of the latter (see Figure 9B). In this position, a tilting image of the pavilion C of the gem can be captured by cyclic tilting of the specimen holder for gem 49A relative to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera, as indicated by the arrow K.

The specimen holder for gem 49A is also configured with a canoe-shaped opening 56, the deepest part 56A of which passes through it, to mount the gem 14 so that its longitudinal axis T is perpendicular to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera and that opposite parts of its crown D are the upper surface and the lower surface of the gem (see FIG. 10A). When mounted in this way, the gem 14 can be placed in the field of vision of the CCD camera so as to allow the capture of an image of the crown D of the gem (see FIG. 10B). In this case, the image of the crown D of the gem is accompanied by the remark that the crown is not polished.

Referring now to Figures 11A and 11B, a gem specimen holder 49B includes a spur gear arrangement 57 with a hand-turned gear 58 which is used to drive a receiving gear 59 through which an opening cylindrical 61. The gem 14 can be mounted in the specimen holder for gem 49B with its longitudinal axis T coaxial with the optical axis 13 with CCD camera and with its table at the top, thus allowing the entry of a rotating image of the gem. In addition, a moving image can be captured in a precessional movement of the gem table by combining the rotational movements of the gem and a cyclic tilt around the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera, as indicated by the arrow. L.

If we now refer to Figure 12, the gem 14 can be mounted in the opposite direction in the cylindrical opening, with its base B at the top, so that when the specimen holder for gem 49B is inclined relative to the external frame 41, its pavilion C is at the top, thus allowing the capture of a rotating image of the latter.

If we now refer to Figures 13 to 15, a specimen holder for gem 49C is used with a light source 62 whose light beam 63 has a light beam axis 64, to create the image of a mark of recording consisting of segments 66 of light scattering (represented in an exaggerated size in FIG. 15) inscribed on the table A of the gem close to one of its edges. The gem specimen holder 49C includes a U-shaped member 67 which has a lower horizontal branch 68, a vertical arm 69 and an upper horizontal branch 71. The U-shaped member 67 is dimensioned such that when the lower branch 68 is slidably inserted into the central pair of grooves 29, the upper branch 71 is arranged above the cover 33. The upper branch 71 is provided with a support 72 with an upper surface 73 inclined and with a cylindrical hollow 74 receiving a gem, which receives a fitting 76 for mounting the gem 14 so that its table A are inclined relative to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera, including an acute angle β. The gem receiving lining 76 can rotate about an axis of rotation R and is provided with a hollow 77 for receiving the gem 14 so that the longitudinal axis T of the gem coincides with the axis of rotation R of ia garnish. The specimen holder for gem 49C is fixed so that the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera sees a small imprint 78 of about 1 mm in diameter located at the crown of table A of the gem, following which the CCD camera 12 follows an annular path 79 with a width of 1 mm along the crown of the gem table when the gem receiving lining 76 is rotated. The light source 62 is adjusted so that the axis 64 of its light beam intercepts the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera on the small imprint 78, whereupon the perpendicular 79 to the table A of the gem in this location coincides with the bisector 81 of the angle between the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera and the axis 64 of the light beam of the light source. In this arrangement, the table A of the gem reflects the light beam 63 to strike the CCD camera 12 so that the recording mark 66 can be detected by its light scattering segments when it is placed at the point of intersection of the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera and the axis 64 of the light beam of the light source.

Referring now to Figure 16, a 49D gem specimen holder is similar to the 49C gem specimen holder except that it is used to create the image of a registration mark on the crown. C of a gem. In this case, the specimen holder for gem 49C further comprises a device 82 placed under the action of a spring and intended to urge the table A of the gem.

If we now refer to FIGS. 17A and 17B, a specimen holder 49E for gem is provided for creating images of silhouettes of the gem 14 in order to create a representation of the gem in three-dimensional lattice of wire created by computer, and a three-dimensional computer-generated representation of the gem 14 which can be viewed in a three-dimensional viewing space. The gem specimen holder 49E has a stepping motor 83 which rotates a spindle 84 in the axis of rotation 86 and perpendicular to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera. The pin 84 ends with a pin end 87 which passes through an opening 88 and on which a circular member 89 for supporting the gem can be removably fixed. The gem support member 89 includes a reference mark 91 and is used in conjunction with a light diffuser 24A having a black spot 24B for reasons which will be described later. The gem specimen holder 49E also has a calibration square 92 which is located in a plane 93 perpendicular to the optical axis 13 of the CCD camera and which is coplanar with the axis of rotation 86.

Let us now describe the use of the system for the sale on the website of a new individual gem, the image portfolio of which must be displayed on a computer viewing station and / or on a computer terminal which displays visual images. continuously moving a gem as a series of animated images created by computer rather than by streams of video images.

The seller of the gem studies the gem itself and determines all of the necessary information that needs to be passed on to a prospective buyer, including the location of imperfections. The seller enters the website under a subscriber number and enters specific details concerning a gem, on the basis of his evaluation, the details including among others: its dimensions, its size, its color, its size in carats, its clarity, the asking price per carat and the details of a possible certificate.

The seller selects a suitable gem specimen holder and places the gem base in the cylindrical opening of the holder, whereupon the gem is kept vertical with its table at the top. The seller slides the gem specimen holder into the support block and adjusts its position so that the center of the gem table is located in the center of the display screen. The seller adjusts the magnification of the CCD camera so that the image of the gem occupies almost the entire screen and, when satisfied with the image, activates the frame capture device to capture the image under a filename Image of the table. The seller can for example then mark the image of one or more AOIs, as shown in Figure 7B. The seller repeats the operation to capture floating still images, of a size close to the full screen, of the crown of the gem, under the file name Image of the crown, the pavilion of the gem kept under the file name Image of the pavilion and the pellet of the gem preserved under the file name Image of the pellet.

The seller performs the steps below to obtain a first and a final digital still image complementary to the table of the gem, which will be used to display a continuously tiltable visual image of the latter and a continuously moving visual image in a displacement precession type. The vendor calls a Tilt Table subroutine, which requests that the first and last image of the gem table be saved under the file names First Image and Last Image, respectively. The seller rotates the gem specimen holder by an acute angle a, over a range of about 2 ° to 8 °, relative to the optical axis of the CCD camera, and this in a first direction, and it captures the so-called first image of the gem table under the file name First image of the table. The seller then rotates the gem specimen holder by the same acute angle in a direction opposite to the optical axis of the CCD camera and captures the so-called Last image from the gem table under the file name Last image of the table. The seller repeats these steps to obtain a first and a last digital still image complementary to the gem pavilion, which are saved under the file names First pavilion image and Last pavilion image, which will be used to display a tilting visual image. continuously from the latter.

The seller performs the following steps to obtain two complementary digital images, left and right, of the gem table, which will be used to display a stereoscopic image. The vendor calls a Stereoscopic Image subroutine that asks to save the so-called left image and the so-called right image of the table of a gem under the respective file names Left Image and Right Image. The seller repeats the steps described above to capture the so-called tilting image of the gem table, except that this time the first image of the gem table is saved under the file name Image left, while the last image from the gem table is saved as the Right Image file name. In this way, the two images captured are comparable to the images that will be seen by a user who looks at a stationary object first with one eye and then with the other eye. As a variant, the right image of the gem table can be captured after the capture of its left image, by rectilinear displacement of the specimen holder for gem in the negative X direction, the images being then appropriately manipulated in the X and Y directions using a dedicated graphical user interface (“Graphie user interface - GUI”) 94 to allow the display of a clear stereoscopic image (see FIG. 28).

The seller performs the following steps to obtain a representation of the gem in three-dimensional wire mesh, and a series of images that are necessary to create a three-dimensional representation of the gem. The vendor calls a three-dimensional representation subroutine that requires dozens of bitmap silhouettes of the gem and five or more images of the gem along different lines of sight, which include all of the different facets of the gem. The seller mounts the gem on the gem support member by a technique known as "dry adhesion" which involves pressing the gem table against the gem support member with sufficient pressure so that the gem is fixed by natural adhesion to the gem support member. The seller then mounts the gem support member on the end of the spindle with the reference mark in the 12 o'clock position and replaces the initial light diffuser on the base with the light diffuser with the large black spot for the lighting said from the back of the gem. The seller then activates the motor to rotate the gem, following which preferably 90 silhouettes are taken at 4 ° intervals so that most of the vertices of the gem are captured in the silhouettes (see Figure 19A) . The subroutine then processes the bitmaps using curve fitting techniques and the like to determine the position of all the vertices of the gem in a three-dimensional object space, to construct a three-dimensional lattice representation of the gem from wire 95 to starting from both its detected vertices and its calculated vertices (see Figure 19B). The three-dimensional wire mesh can be manipulated in a three-dimensional viewing space by means of a suitable control device, i.e. a computer mouse, and also has an indication which corresponds to the reference mark. The seller then creates images of the calibration square without changing the system setting, so that the subroutine can then calculate the external dimensions of the gem and the relative proportions of its different faces. To create the three-dimensional representation of the gem, the seller creates images of the gem along different lines of observation and then superimposes the three-dimensional lattice of wire so that each of the facets of the gem is correctly superimposed on its corresponding facets. when they appear on the images (see Figure 19B). After each of these overlays, the subroutine creates an array of Bitmap information of the textures of each facet of the gem.

Prospective gem buyers examine the inventory of gems for sale on the website in a similar manner to that described above for websites that are already commercially active. However, instead of receiving a simple list of gems that meet its search parameters, in this case, the prospective buyer receives a graphical user interface (GUI) 96 showing a still image that is alive in color, floating and d '' a size close to full screen from the table of one of the gems that meet its search parameters, and which was downloaded from the website (see Figure 21). In addition, GUI 96 presents a side column 97 containing relevant details of the gem, which include its dimensions, size, color, clarity, price, quantity, code, certificate and seller details. .

GUI 96 also features icons for viewing additional images of the gem, which are also downloaded from the website, as follows. A 98 icon to display the still image of

its crown, saved as the Crown Image file name. An icon 99 allowing to display the still image of its base, saved under the name of file Base image. An icon 101 used to display a still image of its pavilion, saved as the image file of the pavilion. An icon 102 allowing to display a stereoscopic image of his table, saved under the respective file names Image left and Image right. An icon 103 allowing to display a continuously tilting visual image of its table, which uses the images saved under the file names First image of the table and Last image of the table, the image having the form of a series of animated, computer-generated l (n) still images, each constructed according to the relation: l (n) = pl (first) + (1-p) l (last), with 0 <p <1, l (first ) being the image kept under the file name First image of the table and l (last) being the image saved under the file name Last image of the table. An icon 104 allowing to display a continuously tilting visual image of its flag, which uses the images saved under the file names First image of the flag and Last image of the flag, in a similar manner to the display of a tilting visual image continuously from his table. An icon 106 making it possible to display a visual image continuously rotating l (rot) of its table by manipulation of the image saved under the file name Image of the table, in accordance with the relation: l (rot) with the coordinates of the pixel (i, j): i (rot) = icosO - jsinG j (rot) = isinO + jcosO

from an observation line that changes continuously and is directed towards the gem (see Figure 20). An icon 107 making it possible to display a rotating visual image which can be continuously displaced from its flag by manipulation of the image saved under the flag image file name, in a manner similar to the display of a visual image rotating by continuous from his table. An icon 108 making it possible to display a moving visual image l (z) in a continuous precession movement of its table in accordance with a line of observation changing continuously and directed towards the gem, by manipulation of the images l (first) and l (last), following l (z) = pl (rot (first)) + (lp) l (rot (last)), with 0 <p <1, l (first) and l (last) being the first and the last still image of the surface of the gem, Longitudinal tax of the gem defining a first direction during the capture of the first image and a last direction during the capture of the last image so that the two directions define between them a plane and intercept an acute angle a, and l (rot) with the pixel coordinates (i, j):

i (rot) = icosG - jsinG

j (rot) = isinè + jcose

An icon 109 making it possible to display enlarged images of one or more of the imperfections of the gem, as indicated by the areas of interest introduced by the seller of the gem on one or more of the still images of his table, of his crown, its base and its flag. An icon 111 for displaying a three-dimensional representation of the gem, viewable in a three-dimensional display space in which each of the facets of the representation is textured in accordance with a particular line of observation directed towards the gem in accordance with the relation F (i) = EpQ ') F (ij) with Xp (j) 2 = 1 for j = 1 to n different textures of the same facet F (i), each taken in a different direction of observation, the p (j ) being the cosines of the direction of the observation line in a predefined Cartesian coordinate system.

Finally, the GUI can also include an icon 112 making it possible to display a Gem Certificate 113 (see FIG. 22) of the gem, issued by an internationally recognized body, the Gem Certificate comprising a delivery number, a delivery date, details regarding shape, size, weight, proportions and measurements, clarity, fluorescence, color and comments. In addition, the Gem Certificate 113 includes one or more of the living color images of the main surfaces of the gem, i.e. its table, crown, base and flag, along with AOI 114 which delimit the borders surrounding its imperfections. Alternatively, images can be replaced with representations of the wire lattice gem, while AOIs can be replaced by arrows 116 and the like to graphically indicate the location of an Imperfection. From a portfolio of gems of living color digital images, as well as his Gem Certificate possibly available, a well-trained professional has all the information necessary to check the details provided by the seller about a gem that he plans to buy, and to assess its market value without having to physically study the gem itself.

Although the invention has been described in the context of a limited number of embodiments, it will be understood that numerous variants, modifications and that other applications of the invention can be made without departing from the scope of the appended claims. For example, the digital acquisition device may be provided with an enlargement facility for enlarging a gem, while the Gem Certificate for a particular gem may be distributed in the conventional manner to potential buyers in hard copy. In addition, the method for displaying a continuously moving visual image on a computer terminal can also be applied to any object, as can the method for obtaining two complementary digital images, left and right, of an object, to display a stereoscopic image.

TRANSLATION OF MENTIONS IN FIGURES Figure 1 Website Website

Inventory of gemstones Inventory of gems for sale sell

Figures 7B, 8B, 9B Size Size

Color Color

Clarity Limpidity

Remarks: Fiat stone Remarks: flat stone

Figure 10B Size Size

Color Color

Clarity Limpidity

Remarks: Fiat stone Notes: girdle stone is not polished plate, unpolished crown

Figure 21 Dimension Dimensions

Cut Size

Color Color

Pear pear

Size Size

Clarity Limpidity

Price Price

Quantity Quantity

Code Code

Certificate Certificate

Seller details Seller details

Back Back

Glitch inside Defect inside

Another type of flaw Another type of fault

Tilt table Tilt table

Tilt pavilion Tilt pavilion

Rotating table Rotating table

Rotating pavilion Rotating pavilion

Precession table Precession table

Zoom Magnification

Full gemstone Full gemstone

Gem Certificate Gem Certificate

Figure 22 Gem Certificate Gem Certificate

Issue Number Issue number

Date Date

Dimension Dimensions

Cut Size

Pear pear

Size Size

Proportions Proportions measurement Measurement

Clarity Limpidity

Fluorescence Fluorescence

Color Color

Comments Comments

Claims (37)

1. A system for trading in gems, each gem having a flat table defining a longitudinal axis perpendicular thereto, a crown, a flag and a base, the system comprising a plurality of user terminals for capturing digital images in living colors of a gem, each user terminal being able to create the same standardized portfolio of live digital color images of a particular gem to allow a prospective buyer to independently assess its market value in accordance with standards internationally recognized.
2. The system as claimed in claim 1, in which a portfolio of gems comprises at least one element of the group consisting of: a floating still image of its table; a floating still image of its flag; a floating still image of his crown; a floating still image of its base; two complementary still images, left and right, of the surface of a gem, to allow the display of a stereoscopic image of the latter; a moving image of one of the surfaces of the gem; a three-dimensional representation of a gem, viewable in a three-dimensional display space; an image of its registration mark; details of the sizes and relative proportions of the surfaces of a gem; and a Gem Certificate.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein at least one image comprises: an area of interest indicating the presence of an imperfection which is discernible therein, and / or a color diagram.
4. The system as claimed in claim 2, in which said moving image is: a tilting image, in which each animated still image created by computer In is constructed in accordance with the relation l (n) = pl (first) + (lp) l ( last), where 0 <p <1, l (first) and l (last) being the first and last still image of the surface of the gem, the longitudinal axis of the gem defining a first direction while entering the first image and a last direction during the capture of the last image, so that the two directions define a plane between them and intersect at an acute angle a; or a rotating image in which each animated image created by computer l (rot) is constructed according to the relation: l (rot) with the pixel coordinates (i, j): i (rot) - icosG - jsinG j (rot) = isinG + jcosG; or a moving image of the precession displacement type in which each animated image created by computer l (z) is constructed in accordance with the relation: l (z) = pl (rot (first)) + (lp) l (rot (last )), with 0 <p <1, l (first) and l (last) being the first and last still image of the surface of the gem, the longitudinal axis of the gem defining a first direction while entering the first image and a last direction during the capture of the last image, so that the two directions define a plane between them and intersect at an acute angle oc, and l (rot) with the coordinates of the pixel (i, j) : i (rot) = icosG - jsin0 j (rot) = isinG + jcosG
5. The system as claimed in claim 2, in which said three-dimensional representation has facets which are each textured in accordance with a particular line of observation directed towards the gem, in accordance with the relation: F (i) = ZpG) F (ij ) with Sp (j) 2 = 1 for j = 1 to n different textures of the same facet F (i), each taken along a different observation line, the pG) being the cosines of the direction of the line of observation in a predefined Cartesian coordinate system.
6. The system as claimed in claim 2, in which said Gem Certificate comprises at least one representation of the gem in which an imperfection of the gem is discernible and the location of which on at least one of said representations at least present is indicated therein. graphically.
7. The system of claim 1, further comprising at least one data storage device for storing said portfolios of live color digital images.
8. A device for storing data which stores a plurality of portfolios of living digital colored images of gems for sale, intended for use in the gem trading system according to any one of claims 1 to 7.
9. A method for trading in gems based on the system of any of claims 1 to 7 and on the data storage device of claim 8, allowing one or more potential buyers of gem to have remote access to the data storage device, whereby each prospective buyer can examine the portfolio of images of a gem that they plan to purchase.
10. User terminal for capturing images of a gem, the user terminal comprising: a) a base; b) a support block mounted on said base and carrying a member allowing the support light of a gem to pass through, which carries a gem in a central part of said support block, said support block essentially protecting the gem from ambient light without completely excluding ambient light from said central part, and comprising an elimination arrangement for eliminating the gem from the perpendicular opposite directions, in a substantially balanced manner, said directions comprising a first axial direction for eliminating a first main surface of said support member gem, a second axial direction for removing a second main surface of said gem support member opposite said first main surface and a third direction for radially illuminating said central portion; and c) a digital image acquisition device having an optical axis and mounted on said base for capturing an image of the illuminated gem through an opening formed in said support block opposite said first main surface of said support member. of gem.
11. User terminal according to claim 10, wherein said support block has the shape of an open-ended box with a top surface, a base surface and two substantially opposite parallel walls.
12. User terminal according to claim 10 or 11, wherein said support block has the following internal dimensions: length = 6 +/- 15% cm, width 5 +/- 15% cm and height 5 +/- 15 % cm.
13. User terminal according to any one of claims 10 to 12, wherein said elimination arrangement comprises at least one annular source of diffuse white light for lighting in at least one of said first and said second axial directions .
14. User terminal according to any one of claims 10 to 13, wherein said elimination arrangement comprises light reflecting parts, for reflecting light radially in the direction of said central part.
15. User terminal according to any one of claims 10 to 14, in which said gem support member comprises a carriage provided with an external frame intended to be slidably received in two opposite grooves, and two support members pivotally mounted on said outer frame to assume a first position essentially at edge with said outer frame and a second position which subtends an acute angle relative to said outer frame.
16. User terminal according to claim 15, in which said external frame comprises two opposite support members, at least one of said support members having a slot which extends longitudinally to prevent by friction an uncontrolled free movement of said carriage in two grooves.
17. User terminal according to any one of claims 10 to 15, in which said gem support member comprises a specimen holder for flat gem, allowing light to pass, of the glass slide type, traversed by at least an opening for releasably receiving a part of the body of a gem to mount the gem in a predetermined position.
18. User terminal according to claim 17, wherein said opening has the shape of a cylinder or the shape of a canoe.
19. User terminal according to any one of claims 10 to 18, in which said gem support member comprises a specimen holder for flat gem, allowing light to pass, in the form of a glass slide, provided with a a member mounted for rotation and intended to support a gem, which may include a spur gear arrangement for rotating said member mounted for rotation.
20. User terminal according to any one of claims 10 to 14, further comprising a gem specimen holder provided with a rotating gem specimen holder for rotating a gem with its crown turned towards said digital device d 'acquisition of images.
21. User terminal according to claim 20, in which said gem specimen holder comprises a calibration square situated in a plane perpendicular to said optical axis and coplanar with an axis of rotation of said rotary gem specimen holder.
22. User terminal according to claim 20 or 21, wherein said gem specimen holder is replaceable.
23. User terminal according to any one of claims 10 to 14, further comprising: (d) a light source having a light beam whose light beam axis intersects said optical axis at a point of intersection and defining a bisector between these axes; and (e) a gem support member for supporting a gem so that said bisector coincides with the perpendicular to the portion of its surface; and being selectively movable relative to said point of intersection, whereby the surface of the gem is capable of being scanned along a predetermined scanning path to allow detection of the location of a registration mark of the gem.
24. User terminal according to claim 23, wherein said precious stone support member is slidingly supported in said support block.
25. A user terminal according to any one of claims 23 or 24, wherein said gem support member comprises a gem packing rotatably mounted for mounting the gem.
26. The user terminal according to claim 25, wherein said gem receiving trim is replaceable.
27. User terminal according to any one of claims 23 to 26, further comprising a biasing member for fixing a gem in said gem support member.
28. A gem examination device for detecting the location of the registration mark of a gem, the registration mark comprising a series of light scattering segments located on a planar polished surface of the gem which defines a longitudinal axis perpendicular to this surface, the gem examining device comprising: (a) a light source having a light beam with a light beam axis; (b) an optical enlargement device of which an optical axis intersects said axis of light beam at an intersection point and defines a bisector between these axes; and (c) a gem support member for supporting a gem so that said bisector coincides with the perpendicular to the portion of the surface of the gem which is located at said point of intersection, and which can be selectively movable relative to said point of intersection, allowing the surface of the gem to be scanned along a predetermined scan path.
29. A gem examination device according to claim 28, wherein said gem support member comprises a rotationally mounted gem receiving gasket for mounting the gem.
30. A gem examination device according to claim 28 or 29, wherein said gem receiving lining is replaceable.
31. A gem examination device according to any one of claims 28 to 30, further comprising a biasing member for fixing a gem in said gem supporting member.
32. Gem certificate for a gem, the gem certificate comprising at least one representation of the gem in which an imperfection of the gem can be discerned, and the location of which on at least one of said representations at least present is indicated graphically.
33. A gem certificate according to claim 32, wherein said at least one representation includes at least one member of the group consisting of: a live color digital image of the gem; a wire lattice representation of the gem; an area of interest delimiting a border surrounding an imperfection.
34. A method of displaying a continuously moving visual image of the surface of a gem on a computer terminal located remotely from a database, the method comprising the steps consisting in: (a) downloading from the database to the computer terminal of Bitmap information relating to a gem; (b) from the bitmap information, create on the computer terminal an animated still image created in real time by the computer, of the gem, from a particular observation line directed towards the gem; and (c) updating the computer-generated animated still image of the gem from different observation lines directed towards the gem, as directed by a prospective purchaser of the gem on his computer terminal, to thus displaying a series of computer-animated still images of the gem, perceived as a continuously visible visible image by the prospective buyer.
35. The method of displaying a moving image of the surface of a gem according to claim 34, wherein said moving image is: a tilting image, in which each computer-generated animated still image In is constructed in accordance with the relation l (n) = pl (first) + (lp) l (last), where 0 <p <1, l (first) and l (last) being the first and the last still image of the surface of the gem, l the longitudinal axis of the gem defining a first direction during the capture of the first image and a last direction during the capture of the last image, so that the two directions define a plane between them and intersect at an acute angle a; or a rotating image in which each animated image created by computer l (rot) is constructed according to the relation: l (rot) with the pixel coordinates (ij): i (rot) = icosG-jsinG j (rot) = isinG + jcosG; or a moving image of the precession displacement type in which each animated image created by computer I (z) is constructed in accordance with the relation: l (z) - pl (rot (first)) + (lp) l (rot (last )), with 0 <p <1, l (first) and l (last) being the first and last still image of the surface of the gem, the longitudinal axis of the gem defining a first direction while entering the first image and a last direction during the capture of the last image, so that the two directions define a plane between them and intersect at an acute angle a, and l (rot) with the pixel coordinates (i, j) : i (rot) = icosG - jsinè j (rot) = isinè + jcosG or a moving visual image of a three-dimensional representation of a gem visible in a three-dimensional visualization space, in which each of the facets of the representation is textured in agreement with a particular line of observation directed e towards the gem, in agreement with the relation: F (i) - Sp (j) F (ij), with Σρ (02 = 1 for j = 1 with n different textures of the same facet F (i), each taken along a different observation line in agreement with a different observation line, the p (j) being the cosines formed by the direction of the observation line in a predefined Cartesian coordinate system.
36. A method of obtaining a stereoscopic image of the table of a gem, the method comprising the steps of: (a) mounting the gem in the field of vision of a digital image acquisition device; (b) capture a left image of the gem; (c) moving the gem specimen holder relative to the field of vision of the image acquisition device; and (d) capture a straight image of the gem.
37. The method according to claim 36, in which step (c) comprises the operations consisting in: moving the gem in translation, over a distance which corresponds essentially to the distance between two eyepieces of a binocular microscope, or moving in translation and rotate the gem so that the longitudinal axis of the gem defines two directions of intersection in the extreme positions of the axis. SHORT GEM TRADE SYSTEM A system for trading gems, each gem having a flat table defining a longitudinal axis perpendicular thereto, a crown, a flag and a base, the system comprising a plurality of user terminals for entering vivid color digital images of a gem, each user terminal being able to create the same standardized portfolio of vivid color digital images of a particular gem to allow a prospective buyer to independently assess its market value in accordance with internationally recognized standards.
BE200000693A 1999-10-29 2000-10-30 System for the trading of gems. BE1014011A3 (en)

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JP6041909B2 (en) * 2015-01-15 2016-12-14 株式会社ダイアモンドグレーディングラボラトリー Jewelry observation equipment
EP3254089A4 (en) * 2015-02-05 2019-07-17 Rgv Group Llc Systems and methods for gemstone identification
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