AU2018100181B4 - Moving system, method of moving an item and related components - Google Patents

Moving system, method of moving an item and related components Download PDF

Info

Publication number
AU2018100181B4
AU2018100181B4 AU2018100181A AU2018100181A AU2018100181B4 AU 2018100181 B4 AU2018100181 B4 AU 2018100181B4 AU 2018100181 A AU2018100181 A AU 2018100181A AU 2018100181 A AU2018100181 A AU 2018100181A AU 2018100181 B4 AU2018100181 B4 AU 2018100181B4
Authority
AU
Australia
Prior art keywords
upright
uprights
arm
guide
outrigger
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active
Application number
AU2018100181A
Other versions
AU2018100181A4 (en
Inventor
Gino Paul Imbrogno
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Ginco Industries Pty Ltd
Original Assignee
Ginco Ind Pty Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to AU2016904015 priority Critical
Priority to AU2017308025A priority patent/AU2017308025A1/en
Application filed by Ginco Ind Pty Ltd filed Critical Ginco Ind Pty Ltd
Priority to AU2018100181A priority patent/AU2018100181B4/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of AU2018100181A4 publication Critical patent/AU2018100181A4/en
Publication of AU2018100181B4 publication Critical patent/AU2018100181B4/en
Active legal-status Critical Current
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Abstract

Abstract The invention relates to a temporary support when used to support uprights during construction of a tower of a racking bay, the temporary support including first and second outrigger arms and a link arm, the link arm in use arranged to extend between the first and second outrigger arms, the first outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a first upright and the second outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a second upright , and wherein the first outrigger arm and second outrigger arm extend away from their respective uprights towards an open area that is outside of the tower of the racking bay. The invention also relates to a kit of parts for constructing a tower of a racking bay, the kit including uprights and shelf frames for forming the tower, a shelf frame moving system and a shelf frame jig table for positioning shelf frames between uprights to form the tower, and a temporary support of the type described above. Also, the invention relates to a racking bay that includes a plurality of towers constructed from uprights and shelf frames, the uprights having been supported during construction of each tower by a temporary support of the type described above.

Description

Moving System, Method of Moving an Item and Related Components Technical Field [0001] The present invention relates to a moving system, a method of moving an item and to related components, including a temporary support for components during moving. The invention has particular, but not exclusive, application in lifting components, such as construction components, to heights above about 10 metres, particularly within confined environments, such as in the construction of racking bays from a plurality of towers formed from uprights and shelf frames.
Background of Invention [0002] Using cranes or hoists to lift and transport loads between locations is inherently dangerous. Many practices have been developed to manage the risk of injury or death to persons operating, working with, working near, or simply being in an area adjacent to the operational point of a crane. Similarly, practices have been developed to manage the risk of injury or death to persons working in the construction industry. One of the major causes of injury in the construction industry is falls and thus fall-arrest systems have been developed to arrest the fall of a person from heights of above about two metres. Such systems include safety nets, catch platforms and safety harness systems. In Australia and in many countries around the world, stringent work place regulations stipulate what workers can and cannot do and which safety systems and equipment must be in use, particularly in relation to construction at height.
[0003] In construction environments where there are space constraints, controlling the load being lifted into position by a crane becomes more problematic. Space constraints increase the risk that the load will strike adjacent structures causing damage to them or the load being lifted by the crane. Typically, responsibility for controlling the swing of the load being craned into position is held by the “dogger” or “dogman”. The dogger holds a tagline, a line attached to the load, and uses it to control swing of the load. The dogger is also responsible for safely slinging the load, directing the crane operator, and checking the surrounding area for hazards. When the crane operator’s vision is obscured, the dogger provides all instructions to the crane operator to ensure safe movement of the load. Accordingly, the dogger needs to be positioned so that they can safely observe the entire lifting operation from the time the load is slung until it is securely placed in its final position with lifting slings removed.
[0004] Aspects of the present invention have been developed because of the difficulty of safely lifting loads to heights in confined environments. An example of such a confined environment is when the crane is operating within a building, such as a factory or storage facility. Typically, such environments have structural members, such as racking bays formed from a plurality of towers of multiple uprights and shelf frames, either already in place or under construction. In such environments, the crane may need to lift loads to heights over 30 metres above the ground. Further, such loads may need to be lifted between existing structures (such as the towers) with very little clearance room. This means that extra care and thus extra time must be taken to ensure that the load does not strike anything as it is lifted by the crane into position. This can greatly increase the overall construction costs.
[0005] It is also difficult for the dogger to safely observe the entire lifting operation in such confined and tall environments. This is because the only position in which the dogger can really observe the load over the entire lifting operation is from directly below the load. From a safety aspect, it is unacceptable for the dogger to ever stand directly below the load.
[0006] The discussion of the background to the invention herein is included to explain the context of the invention. This is not to be taken as an admission that any of the material referred to was published, known or part of the common general knowledge as at the priority date of this application.
Summary of Invention [0007] A moving system has been developed, the moving system including: a first guide cable mounted between first and second mounting points, a first member arranged for movement along the first guide cable between a first position and a second position, the first member arranged for connection to an item to be craned into position; a second guide cable mounted between first and second mounting points, a second member arranged for movement along the second guide cable between a first position and a second position, the second member arranged for connection to the item to be craned into position; a lifting support arranged for connection to a moving device and to provide support for the item during moving of the item; and wherein when the item is connected to each of the first and second members, the item is set by that connection at a predetermined orientation and when the lifting support is moved by the moving device the first and second members move along their respective guide cables and maintain the item substantially at the predetermined orientation.
[0008] The arrangement of the first and second guide cables, their associated first and second members, and the connection of the item to the first and second members is preferably such as to enable the angular positioning of the item to be maintained at the predetermined orientation as the item is moved, for example upwardly or downwardly, by the moving device. The item is thus moved in a very controlled and predictable manner enabling it to be more readily manoeuvred in very confined environments, such as vertically between rows of a racking bay being constructed, and at greater lifting speeds than would otherwise be safely possible.
[0009] Once a first item is moved into position by the moving system, secured in place and removed from the lifting device, a second item of identical form can be moved into position below the first item. This can be achieved efficiently because there is no need to adjust the positioning of the moving device because the crane line will be in the required position, nor is there any need to change or adjust any of the other components of the lifting system. The second item can simply be secured to the first and second member and moved into position. If a second item different to the first item is to be installed below the first item, it may be necessary to adjust the connection between the second item and each of the first and second members to a new pre-determined orientation.
[0010] The moving device may be a crane or the like with a hook or other arrangement for connection to the lifting support. The lifting support may include a lifting beam which supports the item and thereby enables movement of the item when the lifting support is moved by the crane. The lifting support is preferably secured to the item to prevent inadvertent release by means of pins or other appropriate connectors or connections.
[0011] The first and second guide cables may adopt different forms, for example a cable, chain, rope, rail, rod, track or other component, either non-rigid or rigid. The first and second guide cables each establish a path of travel along which their associated first and second member can be moved and that path of travel should be substantially repeatable each time the associated first or second member is moved therealong.
[0012] When the first and second guide cables are in the form of non-rigid members, such as a length of metal cable, the non-rigid members should be tensioned between the first and second mounting points to ensure repeatability of the path of travel. Any substantive lateral movement of the guide cable will impact on the repeatability of the path of travel.
[0013] The first and second guide cables may, in some circumstances, also be restrained at points along their length so as to control movement, for example lateral movement, of the guide cables to better ensure repeatability of the path of travel.
[0014] The first and second guide cables are preferably arranged to extend substantially vertically and are each arranged to be mounted on a respective upright member. However, it is envisaged that the guide cables could be orientated otherwise to enable the lifting system to move items between non-vertically aligned points. For example, items may be moved horizontally or on an angle.
[0015] Each of the first and second members preferably includes a moving member, such as a roller guide, which is configured to engage with its respective guide cable and in this way be guided to move along the path of travel established by the guide cable. In one form, the roller guide includes a series of paired rollers, the guide cable arranged to run between each pair of rollers. In another form, each of the first and second members includes a wheel or other member arranged to run along or within a body of the guide cable. In such an instance, the guide cable may be formed as an elongate generally U-shaped cross-sectional member.
[0016] Attached to or integrally formed with each of the moving members, is an offset arrangement or bracket. Such an offset bracket provides a connection point for connection with the item and is shaped to offset the item relative to the guide cable and/or other adjacent structure(s) such as the uprights so as to prevent the item contacting the same when the item is moved under the action of the moving device. The offset brackets holds the item at a required predetermined orientation, for example angled to the horizontal, to enable the item to fit between the guide cable and/or other adjacent structure(s) such as the uprights.
[0017] A jig table has also been developed for use with the moving system, which includes a frame for holding a lifting support, the frame being further configured to hold an item located on the lifting support in an angled position. In a preferred form, the angled position is identical or substantially identical to the predetermined orientation defined in the first aspect of the invention.
[0018] The jig table is preferably arranged to be readily movable between locations and to this end may include at least one wheel. In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, the jig table includes multiple legs and each leg is wheeled.
[0019] The frame of the jig table is preferably arranged so that the item can be connected to another component, such as an offset bracket, without the need to move the item off or away from the jig table. This prevents or reduces manual handling of the item.
[0020] However, the present invention relates to a temporary support used as a part of the moving system, which finds particular use when the moving system is adopted in the construction of a racking bay that is made up of a large number of towers formed from uprights and shelf frames, the uprights (and thus the towers) often being 20 to 40m high.
[0021] Thus, the present invention relates to a temporary support when used to support uprights during construction of a tower of a racking bay, the temporary support including first and second outrigger arms and a link arm, the link arm in use arranged to extend between the first and second outrigger arms, the first outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a first upright and the second outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a second upright, and wherein the first outrigger arm and second outrigger arm in use extend away from their respective uprights towards an open area that is outside of the tower of the racking bay.
[0022] In one form of the present invention, the link arm is movable in use between a first position and a second position whilst remaining in the open area. In the first position, the link arm is arranged for connection between the first upright and the second upright. In the second position, the link arm is arranged for connection between the second upright and a third upright of the racking bay.
[0023] In a preferred form, the connection between the first outrigger arm and the first upright is releasable, and the connection between the link arm and the second outrigger arm is such as to enable the link arm to be moved to the second position when the connection between the first outrigger arm and the first upright is released, and in the second position the first outrigger arm is arranged for connection to a third upright whilst the connection between the second outrigger arm and the second upright is retained [0024] In this form, the connection between the link arm and the second outrigger arm is preferably of the type that includes a rod extending through an aperture so as to allow the rod to rotate with respect to the aperture.
[0025] In another form, the connection between the link arm and the outrigger arms is such as to enable the link arm to be movable in use between the first position and the second position, wherein in the first position the link arm is connected via the first outrigger arm to the first upright and via the second outrigger arm to the second upright, and in the second position the link arm is connected via the second outrigger arm to the second upright and via a third outrigger arm to a third upright.
[0026] The present invention also relates to a kit of parts for constructing a tower of a racking bay, the kit including uprights and shelf frames for forming the tower, a shelf frame moving system and a shelf frame jig table for positioning shelf frames between uprights to form the tower, and a temporary support for supporting uprights during construction of the tower, the temporary support including first and second outrigger arms and a link arm, the link arm in use arranged to extend between the first and second outrigger arms, the first outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a first upright and the second outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a second upright, and wherein the first outrigger arm and second outrigger arm in use extend away from their respective uprights towards an open area that is outside of the tower.
[0027] Further, the present invention relates to a racking bay that includes a plurality of towers constructed from uprights and shelf frames, the uprights having been supported during construction of each tower by a temporary support of the type described above.
Brief Description of Drawings [0028] Embodiments of different aspects will now be described, including of the moving system, the jig table and the temporary support, by way of example only and with reference to the racking bay construction shown in the accompanying drawings in which: [0029] Figure 1 is a cross-sectional vertical view of a racking bay; [0030] Figure 2 is an isometric view of a lower part of one of the towers of the racking bay shown in Figure 2; [0031] Figure 3 is an isometric view showing a top cable bracket secured to an upright; [0032] Figure 4 is an isometric view showing a cable guide ready for connection along the length of the upright shown in Figure 3; [0033] Figure 4a is a side view showing two cable guides connected to an upright and a roller guide passing one of the cable guides; [0034] Figure 5 is an isometric view of a roller guide with attached offset bracket; [0035] Figure 6 is an isometric view of a lifting beam; [0036] Figure 7 is an isometric view of a shelf frame connected to a lifting beam and resting on a wheeled jig table; [0037] Figure 8 is an isometric view of a racking tower with a shelf frame secured in the upper most position; [0038] Figure 9 is an isometric view of an outrigger arm in accordance with an embodiment of one aspect of the invention; and [0039] Figure 10 is an isometric view of a link arm in accordance with an embodiment of one aspect of the invention.
Detailed Description [0040] The following description explains the use of a moving system and construction method with reference to the erection of a racking bay within an existing building. The invention is not intended to be limited to only such a use and those skilled in the art will appreciate that the invention can be used to lift, move and hold loads in many different applications and environments. Flowever, the invention is particularly advantageous when used in confined environments.
[0041] Figure 1 is a cross-sectional vertical view of a completed racking bay RB. The racking bay RB is formed from a series of towers T separated by crane aisles CA. As shown in Figure 1, the tops of adjacent towers T are connected by a connection structure CS to provide stability to the racking bay RB. The towers T have a height of about 32 metres, but the invention is not limited to use with or construction of towers T of such a height. Flowever, it is envisaged that the moving system will be of particular value where the height that an item must be craned to is over about 10 metres.
[0042] Each tower T includes multiple rows of paired uprights U forming the length of the tower T (i.e. rows extending into the page of Figure 1). Each row of any tower T is formed by sets of paired uprights U which establish the width of the tower T. The two uprights U of such a pair are connected together to form a truss column TC. This connection is typically by way of horizontal and diagonal members. Most of the towers T in Figure 1 have a width established by three truss columns TC per row, whilst the outermost towers T only include two truss columns TC per row. This arrangement of course may vary.
[0043] Each tower T includes multiple horizontally extending shelves S which typically provide storage across the full width and length of the tower T.
[0044] Figure 2 shows schematically the ground level part of one of the towers T of a racking bay RB which is still under construction. The completed part of the tower T is located between first and second rows A, B of column uprights 20, each row A, B including six uprights 20 that form three truss columns TC. To improve the clarity of Figure 2, the horizontal and diagonal members of each truss column TC are not depicted. The arrows marked A and B point to the first upright 20 of each row that extends generally across the page of Figure 2.
[0045] The completed section of racking frame 10 includes horizontal members 22 extending between adjacent uprights in the same row and horizontal members 24 extending between aligned uprights of adjacent rows A, B. Each of the horizontal members 22, 24 was individually hoisted, installed and then secured at the required position along the height of the upright 20. In this way, the horizontal members 22, 24 stabilise the uprights 22 and also provide connection points for potential stacking platforms/shelves or the like at spaced locations along the length of the uprights 20. It will be appreciated that the individual craning and installation such horizontal members 22, 24 is very time consuming. Also, as explained previously, there are significant dangers associated with craning loads in confined environments and limitations on how construction workers must work in such environments.
[0046] Figure 2 also shows a third row C of uprights 20. The arrow marked C in Figure 2 points to the first upright of the third row of uprights. No individual horizontal members 20, 24 have been established between the second and third rows B, C of uprights 20. Rather, a modular array of horizontal members, in the form of a preassembled shelf frame 30, will be used as an alternative to installing individual horizontal members 20, 24. The shelf frame 30 is assembled and constructed at ground level, either on site or offsite, and is then lifted into position between uprights 20.
[0047] In Figure 2, frame 30 is shown ready for installation between the second and third rows B, C of uprights 20. It will be noted that the third row C only includes the outer most truss columns TC. The middle truss column TC is not installed at this stage for buildability reasons.
[0048] Multiple shelf frames 30 will be installed between the second and third rows B, C of uprights 20. The shelf frames 30 will be spaced vertically along the length of the uprights 20 and secured thereto so as to form individual shelves of the tower T. The shelf frames 30 can be directly secured to the adjacent uprights 20 without need of any intervening members.
[0049] The illustrated shelf frame 30 includes two elongate members 32, 34 that are arranged to extend in a lengthwise direction parallel to the rows of uprights B, C and six cross members 36 connected perpendicularly to the two elongate members 32, 34. Typically, the shelf frame 30 will include one cross member 36 per upright 20 included in a completed row of the tower T and thus includes six cross members 36. The shelf frame 30 as illustrated also includes two additional elongate members 38a, 38b. These additional elongate members 38a, 38b are provided to locate the inner edge of pallets located on the shelf frame 30.
[0050] The shelf frame 30 is shown in Figure 2 mounted on a jig table 40. Each leg of the jig table 40 is mounted on wheels to facilitate movement of the assembled shelf frame 30 to the installation location. Flowever, it will be appreciated that a wheelbarrow type arrangement would also facilitate movement of the jig table 40.
The wheels could also be replaced with one or more skids.
[0051] It will be appreciated that shelf frames 30 may either be manufactured at the installation site or at a distal location. As will be explained later, the wheeled jig table 40 also positions the shelf frame 30 at a desired angular position during a first stage of the installation process. The wheeled jig table 40 and shelf frame 30 are also illustrated in Figure 7.
[0052] In order to install each shelf frame 30 between the second and third rows B, C each shelf frame 30 must be individually hoisted by a crane to the correct installation position. Once in the correct installation position, the shelf frame 30 must be secured to the uprights 20 of the second and third rows B, C. To avoid interference, the uppermost shelf frame 30 must be installed first and the remaining frames 30 are installed in order from the uppermost to the lowermost. Given the cumbersome nature of each shelf frame 30, its dimensions and the confined environment between adjacent rows B, C, craning the shelf frame 30 into position using conventional techniques is problematic, if not impossible. Accordingly, a moving system has been developed to guide movement of the assembled shelf frame 30 as it is craned into the required position. The moving system will now be described.
[0053] The moving system includes a first guide cable 110A mounted between first and second mounting points on an upright 20A. A first member, in the form of a roller guide 150 with attached offset bracket 160 is arranged for movement along the first guide cable 110A. The first member is arranged via the offset member 160 for connection to a shelf frame 30 to be craned into position. A second guide cable 110B is mounted between first and second mounting points of an upright member 20B. The second member, in the form of another roller guide 150 with attached offset bracket 160, is arranged for movement along the second guide cable 110B. The second member is arranged via its associated offset member 160 for connection to the shelf frame 30. A more detailed explanation of the configuration of each roller guide 150 will be provided later in connection with Figure 5.
[0054] A lifting support 170 is arranged for connection to a moving device such as a crane (not shown). The lifting support 170 provides support for the shelf frame 30 during movement by the crane. The shelf frame 30 is connected to each of the first and second members at a predetermined orientation so that when the lifting support 170 is moved by the moving device, each of the first and second members 150 moves along their respective guide cables 110A, 110B and maintains the shelf frame 30 substantially at the predetermined orientation.
[0055] Looking at Figure 2, we can see that the first guide cable 110A and second guide cable 110B as illustrated are each formed by a length of metal cable. The first length of metal cable is attached to the first of the uprights 20A and the second length of metal cable is attached to a second of the uprights 20B. Uprights 20A and 20B are uprights 20 common to the same row (e.g. row C) and are the uprights adjacent the gap where the middle truss column TC will later be installed. The methodology for securing each guide cable 110A, 11 OB to its respective upright 20A, 20B would normally be identical. Accordingly, the method of securing the first guide cable 110A will only hereafter be described.
[0056] First guide cable 110A is secured at either end to the upright 20A so that in use, the guide cable 110A retains a required tension. Guide cable 110 is preferably a metal cable but may be chain, rod, rope or other member.
[0057] As best shown in Figure 3, the top end of the cable 110A is secured to the upper most end of the upright 20A using a top cable bracket 120. The top cable bracket 120 may adopt many different forms but as illustrated includes a simple T-bracket 120 arranged to be bolted to the upright 20A. A shackle 122 enables connection of the upper end of the cable 110A to the cable bracket 120. The bottom end of the cable 110A is secured to the lower most end of the upright 20A, preferably just above ground level, using a bottom cable bracket 130. The bottom cable bracket 130 may adopt many different forms but for ease of manufacture and installation, preferably adopts a configuration similar to the top bracket 120. A cable tensioning device (not shown) is provided, typically at the bottom end of the cable 110A, to ensure the proper tensioning of the cable 110A. Various suitable cable tensioning devices will be known by a person skilled in the art.
[0058] As best shown in Figure 3, when the cable 110A is properly secured between the top and bottom cable brackets 120,130 it is spaced horizontally from the upright 20A. To ensure that this spacing is maintained along the full height of the upright 20A and to prevent excessive lateral movement of the cable 110, cable guides 140 will typically need to be installed along the upright 20A.
[0059] Figure 4 illustrates one of the cable guides 140 prior to attachment to the upright 20A. Cable guide 140 includes a base 142 arranged to be bolted to the upright 20A and a pivotable guide member 144. Guide member 144 has an inner end 144a arranged for spring loaded pivotal movement about a longitudinal axis Ai and a V-shaped outer end 144b.
[0060] In Figure 4 only part of the cable 110A is shown. Flowever, it should be understood that in use, cable 110A passes through the V-shaped outer end 144b of the guide member 144 so that lateral movement of the cable 110A is limited by contact with the V-shaped outer end 144b. Guide member 144 is biased by two springs 146. One spring biases the guide member 144 to pivot in a first direction and the other spring biases the guide member 144 to pivot in a second opposite direction. In this way, the guide member 144 is normally held in a neutral position as shown in Figure 4.
[0061] Figure 5 illustrates one of the previously mentioned roller guides 150, shown fitted with an offset bracket 160. As previously described in relation to Figure 2, one roller guide 150 is fitted to each of the guide cables 110A, 110B. As will be later explained in more detail, each roller guide 150 helps to guide and limit movement of the shelf frame 30 as it is moved into position by the crane. The shelf frame 30 is located on the lifting support 170 which is attached to a crane via the crane’s hook.
[0062] The offset bracket 160 attached to the roller guide 150 has two functions. Firstly, it provides a mechanism by which an item, such as one of the shelf frames 30, can be secured to the roller guide 150. Secondly, the offset bracket 160 is shaped so as to offset the item relative to the upright 20A when the item is being craned into position and/or to hold the item at a required angle relative to the upright 20A. In this way, the item will be prevented from striking the upright 20A and will also be delivered to the rigger at a required orientation. The size and shape of the offset bracket 160 will vary depending on the item that is being craned into position.
[0063] Roller guide 150 is arranged to be mounted about the guide cable 110A so that when the item, for example one of the shelf frames 30, is being craned into position, roller guide 150 will travel upwardly along the length of the guide cable 110A. Roller guide 150 travels upwardly along the guide cable 110A as a consequence of its attachment to the shelf frame 30 which is located on the lifting support 170. Hence, roller guide 150 is in effect pulled upwardly by the crane along the length of the guide cable 110A. As will be explained later, shelf frame 30 and each roller guide 150 are also preferably connected to the lifting support 170.
[0064] It will be appreciated that as the roller guide 150 is arranged to be pulled along the guide cable 110A, the guide cable 110A establishes a path of travel. Provided the location of the guide cable 110A does not substantially move, for example by ensuring the cable 110A is held in tension between its upper and lower connections to the upright 20A, the path of travel of the roller guide 150 as it moves along the cable 110A will be repeatable, controlled and predictable. This means that the path of travel of the shelf frame 30 connected between the two roller guides 150 as it is moved by the action of the crane, will also be repeatable, controlled and predictable.
[0065] Although the roller guide 150 and offset bracket 160 are described and illustrated herein as separate members, it should be understood that this need not necessarily be the case. The features of the offset bracket 160 may be incorporated with the roller guide 150 to form a roller member. However, it is envisaged that the ability to remove one offset bracket 160 from the roller guide 150 and replace it with another, perhaps one of a different shape may be advantageous. A different shaped or sized offset bracket 160 may be configured to hold an item at a different predetermined orientation, which might be necessary to accommodate an item of different size and/or shape, or a different sized spacing between the rows of uprights through which the item is to be moved.
[0066] As best shown in Figure 6, lifting support 170 includes a central longitudinal member 172, a pair of cradles 174, crane chains 176, and crane ring 178. The cradles 174 are configured to receive parts of the shelf frame 30 when the shelf frame 30 is seated thereon. Crane ring 178 is configured to receive the hook of a crane so as to enable hoisting of the lifting support 170 and thus also the shelf frame 30 seated on the cradles 174 of the lifting support 170.
[0067] Although not shown in Figure 6, in use each end of the central member 172 of the lifting support 170 is arranged to be connected to one of the roller guides 150. This connection is by way of a chain 179 (Figure 8), rope or other such connection and provides the means to pull the roller guide 150 from the top of the guide cable 110Ato the bottom of the cable 110B simply by lowering the lifting support 170 to the ground. The connection also prevents the roller guides 150 from lowering down the guide cables 110A, 110B once the offset bracket 160 is disconnected from the shelf frame 30 following connection of the shelf frame 30 in position on the uprights 20. This connection also provides means for restricting unwanted movement of the lifting support 170. More particularly, as one end of the central member 172 is connected to upright 20A via roller guide 150 and guide cable 110A and the other end of the central member 172 is connected to upright 20B via roller guide 150 and guide cable 11 OB, movement of the lifting support 170 is limited within the range of the chains 179. Accordingly, although the lifting support 170 can be freely lifted and lowered vertically by the crane, side to side movement either horizontally or end to end, and spinning movement is restricted due to the central member’s 172 connection to the pair of roller guides 150 by the chains 179 and when the shelf frame 30 is connected to the lifting support 170, also by the shelf frame’s connection 30 to each roller guide 150 via its respective offset bracket 160.
[0068] As best shown in Figure 5, roller guide 150 includes a U-shaped body 152 that provides a connection point for the offset bracket 160. Body 152 also provides mounting points for three pairs of grooved rollers 154 which are spaced along the length of the body 152. Guide cable 110A is arranged to extend through each pair of grooved rollers 154. The number of pairs of rollers 154 mounted on the roller guide 150 may vary depending on the configuration of the roller guide. It should also be understood that although roller guide 150 includes pairs of rollers 154, it is envisaged that the roller guide 150 could be replaced with another form of guide arrangement that guides movement along the guide cable 110A. For example, the rollers 154 may be replaced with one or more tracks that in use run along the guide cable 110A or they may be replaced with a member, such as a tube or the like, through which the cable 110A would extend. Alternatively, a modified arrangement might include a body including at least one roller wheel extending therefrom and which is arranged to run or slide within or on a track which replaces the previously described metal cable 110A. The track might be formed by a generally U-shaped cross-sectional member.
[0069] Returning to Figure 2, the method of moving a shelf frame 30 into the required position on the tower T and securing it thereto will now be explained.
[0070] Firstly, a lifting support 170 is positioned on a wheeled jig table 40. A shelf frame 30 is then positioned on the wheeled jig table 40 so that it is located on the cradles 174 of the lifting support 170. Typically, the shelf frame 30 would be secured to the lifting support 170 using some form of connectors, for example keeper pins. Although the lifting support 170 is described as being positioned on the wheeled jig table 40 before the shelf frame 30 is positioned on the jig table 40, this may not necessarily be the case.
[0071] The wheeled jig table 40 is then wheeled into position between the second and third rows B, C. The wheeled jig table 40 is arranged so that the shelf frame 30 is held at an angle. The angle is set so that the wheeled jig table 40 can be easily wheeled between the second and third rows of uprights B, C without any part of the shelf frame 30 striking the uprights 20. It will be appreciated that the angle at which the shelf frame 30 sits may vary depending on the particular shelf frame.
[0072] Whilst still supported on the wheeled jig table 40, the shelf frame 30 is positioned so that the offset bracket 160 of each roller guide 150 can be secured, for example by bolting, to the required points on the shelf frame 30. The angle that the shelf frame 30 is held by the wheeled jig table 40 is also preferably set so as to make connection of the shelf frame 30 to the offset brackets 160 possible without need for lifting or substantial adjustment of the positioning of the shelf frame 30. The shelf frame 30 is connected to the offset brackets 160 so that it is held in a predetermined orientation.
[0073] Once the connection between the shelf frame 30 and each of the offset brackets 160 is completed, each end of the shelf frame 30 is held firmly between the pair of offset brackets 160 in a manner that prevents side to side movement of the shelf frame 30. The free end of the chain 179 of each roller guide is then connected to the lifting support 170.
[0074] The crane hook can then be connected to the crane ring 178 of the lifting support 170 so that the crane can be used to lift the shelf frame 30 off the jig table 40. Once the shelf frame 30 is clear of the jig table 40, the jig table 40 is wheeled clear of the tower T. That jig table 40 can then be fitted with another lifting support 170 and another shelf frame 30 in anticipation of another shelf frame 30 installation.
[0075] The crane can then be used to lift the shelf frame 30 attached thereto vertically to its required connection height within the tower T. It will be appreciated that the upper most shelf frame 30 of the tower T must be installed first, followed in height order with the remaining shelf frames 30.
[0076] As the crane lifts the lifting support 170 and shelf frame 30 vertically away from the wheeled jig table 40, the roller guides 150 will be pulled upwardly along the guide cables 110A, 11 OB. As mentioned previously, movement of the roller guides 150 is restricted due to the engagement between each pair of grooved rollers 154 and the associated tensioned guide cable 110A, 110B. The intention is for the roller guides 150 to move along a path of travel established by the guide cables 110A, 110B. In this instance, the path of travel extends substantially vertically. The guide cables 110A, 110B are kept in tension and also restrained along their length by the cable guides 140 so as to prevent movement. In this way, the path of travel along which the roller guides 150 are moved is repeatable, meaning in the context of the described embodiment, that the roller guides 150 can be moved upwardly and downwardly substantially vertically over and over again along the same path.
[0077] It will also be appreciated that because the shelf frame 30 is connected to the roller guides 15 via the offset brackets 160 in the predetermined orientation, the shelf frame 30 can also be moved substantially vertically parallel to the path of travel whilst being retained in that orientation. Further, because the shelf frame 30 is connected between the two offset brackets 160 that are connected to their respective roller guides 150, the shelf frame 30 is restrained from end to end type movement in a direction parallel to the rows of uprights 20. This is because the horizontal spacing between the two roller guides 150 is determined by the horizontal distance between the guide cables 110A, 110B. As the guide cables 110A, 110B are tensioned and are restrained from any significant lateral movement, that horizontal distance is substantially fixed. It will also be appreciated that the shelf frame 30 is located on the lifting support 170 and as such the roller guides 150 will be pulled along their respective cables 110A, 110B substantially evenly. Accordingly, the shelf frame 30 is restrained to move upwardly and downwardly under the action of the crane whilst being retained in the predetermined orientation. The shelf frame 30 will not move to any significant amount other in an end to end direction in a generally horizontal plane, nor will it roll or yaw to any significant amount. In this manner, the orientation of the shelf frame 30 is substantially maintained in the predetermined orientation whereby it will not strike any of the uprights 20 as it is moved into position by the crane.
[0078] Such an arrangement ideally prevents the need for a tagline to be attached to the lifting support 170 due to the controlled positioning of the shelf frame 30. This means that the impact of the weight of the tagline does not need to be counteracted and further there is no requirement for a dogger to ever stand directly below the lifting support 170. This provides a significant safety improvement because the dogger is not underneath the shelf frame 30 should it accidentally fall. Further, the dogger is not required to spend significant time looking upwardly at a sharp angle which may cause injury. Finally, as the predetermined orientation of the shelf frame 30 is maintained during lifting by the crane, it is anticipated that the hoisting speed of the crane will be increased as compared to what would otherwise be possible.
[0079] Once the shelf frame 30 reaches its required attachment position and with the crane still holding the load of the shelf frame 30, riggers will capture the shelf frame 30 and will disconnect the connections to the offset brackets 160. The offset brackets 160 and connected cable guides 150 will then simply hang by the chains 179 from the lifting support 170. Once released from the offset brackets 160, the shelf frame 30 can be connected to the uprights 20 of the second and third rows B, C so as to secure the shelf frame 30 within the tower T.
[0080] Once the shelf frame 30 is securely attached to the tower T, the lifting support 170 is disconnected from the shelf frame 30. If keeper pins are used to connect the lifting support 170 to the shelf frame 30, they will be connected to the lifting support 170 on lanyards or the like. This prevents inadvertent release to the ground which could cause injury to someone below.
[0081] The crane then lowers the lifting support 170 to ground level. Due to the chains 179 that are still connected to the cable guides 150, lowering of the lifting support 170 will pull the cable guides 150 downwardly along their respective guide cables 110A, 110B to return them to their original starting point. The crane hook can then be released from the lifting support 170, and then the lifting support 170 can be taken away. This entire process can then be repeated to install the next shelf frame 30 immediately below the previously installed shelf frame 30.
[0082] Although the chains 179 connected between the lifting support 170 and the cable guides 150 are described as providing the mechanism for returning the cable guides 150 to their original starting point, other arrangements are envisaged. It is also envisaged that other arrangements may be put into place to prevent the cable guides 150 from lowering to their original starting point once the offset brackets 160 are disconnected from the shelf frame 30.
[0083] Figure 8 illustrates the upper most shelf frame 30 secured in position in the tower T. In this Figure, the lifting support 170 has been released from the shelf frame 30 and has been lowered to a position just below the shelf frame 30. The connection of the crane to the crane hook 178 of the lifting support 170 is still retained. The connection of the offset brackets 160 to the ends of the lifting support 170 via chains 179 is also shown in this Figure.
[0084] Figure 8 also shows that prior to the secure connection of all of the shelf frames 30 between the second and third rows B, C, of uprights 20, the outer most uprights of the third row C must, for stability reasons be temporarily secured to the outer most uprights of the second row B. If they are not so secured, the truss columns TC of the third row C would be unstable. Securing the positioning of the uprights of these truss columns TC must be done in a way that does not interfere with lifting of the uppermost shelf frame 30 into position from the ground.
[0085] Accordingly, and in relation to the temporary support of the present invention, in this preferred embodiment an outrigger arm 200 is attached to each of the outer most uprights 20 of the second and third rows B, C adjacent the upper most end (i.e. an outrigger arm 200 is attached to a first upright and another outrigger arm 200 is attached to a second upright). Each outrigger arm 200 extends outwardly towards the nearest crane aisle CA and in doing so does not infringe on the ability of the uppermost shelf frame 30 to be moved into the required position between the second and third rows B, C of uprights 20. It will be appreciated that the crane aisle CA represents an open area that is outside the particular tower of the racking bay.
[0086] The outrigger arms 200 of the first and second uprights are joined by a link arm 210 to establish a temporary support. In this way the outer most truss columns TC of the third row C are temporarily, but securely, connected to the adjacent truss columns of the second row B and thus the finished section of the racking bay RB.
[0087] Figure 9 illustrates the outrigger arm 200 in more detail and Figure 10 illustrates the link arm 210 in more detail. Outrigger arm 200 has a plate 202 at one end configured to enable bolted attachment to the upright 20 and a threaded rod 204 at the other to enable connection to the link arm 210. In Figure 9, two bolts 206 are shown extending through apertures 208 of the plate 202. The plate 202 is shown as including eight apertures 208 for bolts, but other numbers of apertures and bolts are envisaged.
[0088] Link arm 210 has an aperture 212 in each end through which the threaded rod 204 of an associated outrigger arm 200 may pass. A nut (not shown) would be threaded onto the end of the rod 204 after it has passed through the aperture 212 and thus used to secure the link arm 210 to the outrigger arm 200.
[0089] Given the overall length of the truss columns TC (i.e. height of the truss columns TC), it may be necessary to provide such a temporary support at a number of points along the length of the truss columns TC. More particularly, the truss column TC may include a number of sections joined together to establish the full height of the truss column TC. In that event, it would be advisable to include at least one temporary support on each section of the truss column TC.
[0090] Once all of the shelf frames 30 between the second and third rows B, C have been installed, the missing middle truss column TC of the third row C must be installed thereby completing the third row C and the tower T.
[0091] To enlarge the tower T, another row of truss columns TC fitted with shelf frames 30 can be established. This would be done in the same way as previously described in relation to the installation of shelf frames 30 between the second and third rows B, C.
[0092] It will be noted that the outermost uprights 20 of the new fourth row will also need to be stabilised using a temporary support in accordance with the present invention. This can be done by releasing the connection between the outrigger arm 200 that is connected to the first upright of the truss column of the second row B, and then moving that outrigger arm 200 with connected link arm 210 from the first position to a second position. The link arm 210 with connected outrigger arm 200 can be swung by the riggers around 180°so that the discon nected first outrigger arm 200 can then be connected to the outermost upright 20 of the new fourth row (i.e. a third upright). During this process, the second outrigger arm 200, that is the one connected to the upright of the truss column of the third row C (i.e. the second upright), remains connected to the second upright via the plate 202 thereof. It may be necessary to slacken off the associated nut of that second outrigger arm 200 in order to enable the link arm 210 to rotate about the threaded rod 204 thereof from the first position to the second position. Further, during this process, the link arm 210 remains in the open area.
[0093] As an alternative methodology, the outrigger arm 200 connected to the first upright of the truss column of the second row B may be left connected thereto. However, the end of the link arm 210 connected to that outrigger arm 200 is released and then moved from the first position to the second position. When in the second position, the end of the link arm 210 can be connected to a third outrigger arm 200 that was previously connected to the outermost upright 20 of the new fourth row.
[0094] Returning to a description of aspects of the moving system, as mentioned previously, it is advantageous to prevent lateral movement of the guide cables 110A, 110B. This can be facilitated by providing a number of cable guides 140 along the length of each guide cable 110A, 110B. Each cable guide 140 is positioned so that its associated cable 110A, 110B runs through the V-shaped outer end 144b of the guide member 144 when the guide cable is in its required position. The V-shaped outer end 144b restricts lateral movement of the guide cable 110A, 110B. However, as will be better appreciated from Figure 4A, the V-shaped outer end 144b of each cable guide 140 should be able to move out of the way of the roller guide 150 as the roller guide 150 travels along the cable 110A. This is why each guide member 144 is spring loaded for pivotal movement about axis A^ Such movement allows the guide member 144 to move from the neutral position to an upward position when the V-shaped outer end 144b is contacted from underneath by the U-shaped body 152 of the roller guide 150. Once the roller guide 150 clears the cable guide 140, the guide member 144 will return, under the spring bias, to the neutral position. It will of course be appreciated, that when the roller guide 150 is pulled downwardly along the guide cable 110A to return it to ground level, the guide member 144 will be caused to move to a downward positon to allow the roller guide 150 to pass. It then springs back to the neutral position.
[0095] To ensure the desired orientation of the cable 110A, 110B along its full length, it is envisaged that multiple cable guides 140 may need to be installed along the length of each upright 20A, 20B. Further, they should preferably be spaced so that when the V-shaped outer end 144b of one cable guide 140 is not limiting lateral movement of the cable 110A, 110B due to it being moved away from the neutral position, another cable guide 140 will still act to control that lateral movement. To this end, it is envisaged that the cable guides 140 would be paired along the length of each upright 20A, 20B and positioned so that when one cable guide 140 is not limiting lateral movement of the guide cable 110A, 110b, the cable guide 140 immediately above or below will do so. This paired nature of the cable guides 140 along upright 20A is illustrated in Figure 4A.
[0096] It should also be understood that the configuration of the offset bracket 160 can be readily changed to take into account the size and the required predetermined orientation of the shelf frame 30 or other item to be connected thereto. As will be apparent, the predetermined orientation will depend on factors such as the size and shape of the item, the spacing between adjacent rows of the racking bay RB through which the item is to be moved, and any other impediment to movement of the item as it is being lifted into position. If necessary, the offset bracket 160 can be quickly disconnected from the roller guide 150 and replaced with a different one.
[0097] It will also be appreciated that by minimising the friction between the guide cables 110A, 110b and the roller guides 150, it will be possible to ensure even better control of the movement of the roller guides 150 and thus the shelf frame 30. This enables the desired clearances between the shelf frame 30 and truss columns TC to be maintained, minimising the risk of any accidental impact to the truss columns TC or any surrounding structure.
[0098] It will also be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the lifting support 170 as previously described may be replaced with other forms of lifting support. For example, the shelf frame 30 or other item being moved could be supported on a lifting beam which is connected to the crane via a pair of soft slings or lengths of wire rope.
[0099] It will also be appreciated that the moving system enables the shelf frame 30 or other item to be lifted along a substantially vertical path. However, it is envisaged that other alternatives would enable movement of an item along a nonvertical path.
[0100] The moving system is useful because it provides very controlled movement of the item being lifted into position. This enables the item to be moved by a crane in confined environments in a safer manner and preferably at greater hoisting speeds than would otherwise be possible. This in turns speeds up construction times when the moving system is used to lift construction elements into position.
[0101] The embodiments have been described by way of example only and modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention are envisaged.

Claims (5)

  1. Claims
    1. A temporary support when used to support uprights during construction of a tower of a racking bay, the temporary support including first and second outrigger arms and a link arm, the link arm in use arranged to extend between the first and second outrigger arms, the first outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a first upright and the second outrigger arm arranged in use for connection to a second upright, and wherein the first outrigger arm and second outrigger arm in use extend away from their respective uprights towards an open area that is outside of the tower of the racking bay.
  2. 2. A temporary support according to claim 1 wherein the connection between the first outrigger arm and first upright is releasable, and the connection between the link arm and the second outrigger arm is such as to enable the link arm to be moved to a second position when the connection between the first outrigger arm and the first upright is released, and in the second position the first outrigger arm is arranged for connection to a third upright whilst the connection between the second outrigger arm and the second upright is retained.
  3. 3. A temporary support according to claim 1 wherein the connection between the link arm and the outrigger arms is such as to enable the link arm to be movable in use between a first position and a second position, wherein in the first position the link arm is connected via the first outrigger arm to the first upright and via the second outrigger arm to the second upright, and in the second position the link arm is connected via the second outrigger arm to the second upright and via a third outrigger arm to a third upright.
  4. 4. A temporary support according to claim 1 wherein the link arm is movable in use between a first position and a second position whilst remaining in the open area, wherein, in the first position the link arm is arranged for connection between the first upright and the second upright, and in the second position the link arm is arranged for connection between the second upright and a third upright of the racking bay.
  5. 5. A racking bay including a plurality of towers constructed from uprights and shelf frames, the uprights having been supported during construction of a tower by a temporary support in accordance with any one of claims 1 to 4.
AU2018100181A 2016-10-04 2018-02-09 Moving system, method of moving an item and related components Active AU2018100181B4 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2016904015 2016-10-04
AU2017308025A AU2017308025A1 (en) 2016-10-04 2017-09-27 Moving system, method of moving an item and related components
AU2018100181A AU2018100181B4 (en) 2016-10-04 2018-02-09 Moving system, method of moving an item and related components

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2018100181A AU2018100181B4 (en) 2016-10-04 2018-02-09 Moving system, method of moving an item and related components

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
AU2017308025A Division AU2017308025A1 (en) 2016-10-04 2017-09-27 Moving system, method of moving an item and related components

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
AU2018100181A4 AU2018100181A4 (en) 2018-03-15
AU2018100181B4 true AU2018100181B4 (en) 2018-03-22

Family

ID=61568904

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
AU2018100181A Active AU2018100181B4 (en) 2016-10-04 2018-02-09 Moving system, method of moving an item and related components

Country Status (1)

Country Link
AU (1) AU2018100181B4 (en)

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2839320A (en) * 1954-12-07 1958-06-17 Globe Company Pipe connectors
JP2008248664A (en) * 2007-03-30 2008-10-16 Shimizu Corp Hoisting method of curtain wall
US20100059952A1 (en) * 2008-09-11 2010-03-11 Chris Lyman Haley Haley material handling cart
US20130105428A1 (en) * 2011-10-28 2013-05-02 Spacesaver Corporation Structural articulation joint for high density mobile carriage
US20150014262A1 (en) * 2013-07-08 2015-01-15 Kevin Mcauliffe System and Method For Maintaining a Minimum Separation Between Pallets Positioned on Adjacent Racks

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2839320A (en) * 1954-12-07 1958-06-17 Globe Company Pipe connectors
JP2008248664A (en) * 2007-03-30 2008-10-16 Shimizu Corp Hoisting method of curtain wall
US20100059952A1 (en) * 2008-09-11 2010-03-11 Chris Lyman Haley Haley material handling cart
US20130105428A1 (en) * 2011-10-28 2013-05-02 Spacesaver Corporation Structural articulation joint for high density mobile carriage
US20150014262A1 (en) * 2013-07-08 2015-01-15 Kevin Mcauliffe System and Method For Maintaining a Minimum Separation Between Pallets Positioned on Adjacent Racks

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU2018100181A4 (en) 2018-03-15

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9592997B2 (en) Guide rail installation arrangement and a method for installing guide rails
US9410329B2 (en) Lift unit for ascending and descending a scaffold
US9032689B2 (en) Jacking tower
JP2015506885A (en) Weight lifting apparatus and method
US20080308362A1 (en) Cable management assembly and method for construction elevator systems
CN109629813A (en) A kind of arc gradual change is interior to receive structure attached lifting scaffold
JP5577538B2 (en) Mobile safety experience equipment frame and safety experience education method
KR101068229B1 (en) Dismantled tower crane cargo handling system and cargo handling method using thereof
AU2018100181B4 (en) Moving system, method of moving an item and related components
AU2020101007B4 (en) Racking bay tower construction method
US20190218074A1 (en) Moving System, Method Of Moving An Item And Related Components
AU2022202615A1 (en) Moving system, method of moving an item and related components
US20160090277A1 (en) Secured gripping system
JP2005500962A (en) Safety device used to maintain the elevator system on the elevator car
KR101349298B1 (en) Crane apparatus for suspension bridge, and method for elevating bridge block for suspension bridge
JP5927718B2 (en) Mobile safety equipment frame
CN107352445A (en) A kind of boom hoisting
AU2016101598B4 (en) Device and Method for Accessing a Racking System
CN209253981U (en) A kind of fall protection device for working at height
KR0148135B1 (en) Climing device and method of a crane
CN103771266A (en) Method for unloading load pulley from tower crane
WO2021123967A1 (en) An elevator locking device for a vertical automatic warehouse
AU2016225930A1 (en) Device and Method for Accessing a Racking System
US20150166308A1 (en) Method for installing and removing concrete blocks
AU2004293121B2 (en) Lifting apparatus

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
FGI Letters patent sealed or granted (innovation patent)
FF Certified innovation patent