AU2014232707A1 - Snap mobile security apparatuses, methods and systems - Google Patents

Snap mobile security apparatuses, methods and systems

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Publication number
AU2014232707A1
AU2014232707A1 AU2014232707A AU2014232707A AU2014232707A1 AU 2014232707 A1 AU2014232707 A1 AU 2014232707A1 AU 2014232707 A AU2014232707 A AU 2014232707A AU 2014232707 A AU2014232707 A AU 2014232707A AU 2014232707 A1 AU2014232707 A1 AU 2014232707A1
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AU
Australia
Prior art keywords
sms
access
user
server
security
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
AU2014232707A
Inventor
Ayman Hammad
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Visa International Service Association
Original Assignee
Visa International Service Association
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201361800012P priority Critical
Priority to US61/800,012 priority
Application filed by Visa International Service Association filed Critical Visa International Service Association
Priority to PCT/US2014/030517 priority patent/WO2014145708A1/en
Publication of AU2014232707A1 publication Critical patent/AU2014232707A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/30Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices or networks
    • G06Q20/36Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices or networks using electronic wallets or electronic money safes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/30Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices or networks
    • G06Q20/32Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices or networks using wireless devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/30Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices or networks
    • G06Q20/32Payment architectures, schemes or protocols characterised by the use of specific devices or networks using wireless devices
    • G06Q20/327Short range or proximity payments by means of M-devices
    • G06Q20/3276Short range or proximity payments by means of M-devices using a pictured code, e.g. barcode or QR-code, being read by the M-device
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/06Buying, selling or leasing transactions

Abstract

The SNAP MOBILE SECURITY ("SMS") provides verification, access and security to virtual wallet based electronic financial transactions. SMS receives a request from user's device to decode a scannable code and verify the security of the decoded code's contents. SMS decodes the scannable code to obtain code contents requesting access to the wallet account. SMS obtains digital fingerprints of the user device and a request identifier for the request to access the wallet account. The SMS receives from the access requester digital signatures for the requester and the request identifier. SMS confirms the digital fingerprints of the user device verify the device is authorized to access the wallet account. The SMS confirms the received digital signatures verify the access requester and the request are authorized to access the wallet account. The SMS sends wallet unlock and activity unlock keys to the device for activity access to the wallet.

Description

WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 1 SNAP MOBILE SECURITY APPARATUSES, METHODS AND 2 SYSTEMS 3 [oo01] This patent for letters patent document discloses and describes various 4 novel innovations and inventive aspects of SNAP MOBILE SECURITY technology 5 (hereinafter "disclosure") and contains material that is subject to copyright, mask work, 6 and/or other intellectual property protection. The respective owners of such intellectual 7 property have no objection to the facsimile reproduction of the disclosure by anyone as 8 it appears in published Patent Office file/records, but otherwise reserve all rights. 9 PRIORITY CLAIM 10 [0002] This application claims priority to United States Patent Application serial 11 no. 61/800,012, filed March 15, 2013 and entitled "Snap Mobile Security Apparatuses, 12 Methods and Systems," attorney docket 349US01. This application also claims priority 13 to: United States Application serial no. 13/398,817 filed February 16, 2012, entitled 14 "SNAP MOBILE PAYMENT APPARATUSES, METHODS AND SYSTEMS," attorney 1s docket P-42032USo1, which claims priority to United States provisional patent 16 application serial no. 61/443,624 filed February 16, 2011, entitled "MOBILE CAPTURE 17 CHECKOUT APPARATUSES, METHODS AND SYSTEMS," attorney docket no. P 18 42032PRV; United States provisional patent application serial no. 61/512,248 filed July 19 27, 2011, entitled "SNAP MOBILE PAYMENT APPARATUSES, METHODS AND 20 SYSTEMS," attorney docket no. 1oUSoi; United States provisional patent application 21 serial no. 61/522,213 filed August 10, 2011, entitled "UNIVERSAL MOBILE PAYMENT WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 2 1 PLATFORM APPARATUSES, METHODS AND SYSTEMS," attorney docket no. 2 1oUSo3; and United States provisional patent application serial no. 61/527,576 filed 3 August 25, 2011, entitled "SNAP MOBILE PAYMENT APPARATUSES, METHODS AND 4 SYSTEMS," attorney docket no. 1oUSo2. The entire contents of the aforementioned 5 applications are expressly incorporated by reference herein. 6 FIELD 7 [o 003] The present innovations generally address apparatuses, methods, and 8 systems for electronic purchase transactions, and more particularly, include SNAP 9 MOBILE SECURITY APPARATUSES, METHODS AND SYSTEMS ("SMS"). 10 BACKGROUND 11 [0004] Consumer transactions require a customer to select a product from a store 12 shelf or a website, and then to check them out at a checkout counter or a webpage. 13 Product information may be entered automatically by scanning an item barcode with an 14 integrated barcode scanner, and the customer is usually provided with a number of 1s payment options, such as cash, check, credit card or debit card to pay for the purchase. 16 SUMMARY 17 [O O 0 5] In accordance with the teachings provided herein, systems, methods, non 18 transitory computer-readable medium, and apparatuses are disclosed for operation 19 upon data processing devices for providing mobile security, such as to: receive, through 20 one or more processors, a request from a user's device to decode a scannable code and WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 3 1 verify the security of the decoded code's contents; decode, through the one or more 2 processors, the scannable code to obtain code contents requesting access to the wallet 3 account; obtain from the user, through the one or more processors, digital fingerprints 4 of the user device and a request identifier for the request to access the wallet account; 5 receive from the access requester, through the one or more processors, digital signatures 6 for the requester and the request identifier; confirm, through the one or more 7 processors, that the digital fingerprints of the user device verify the device is authorized 8 to access the wallet account; confirm, through the one or more processors, the received 9 digital signatures verify the access requester and the request are authorized to access the 1o wallet account; and send, through the one or more processors, wallet unlock and activity 11 unlock keys to the device for activity access to the wallet. This claimed invention is thus 12 based on the astonishing perception resulting from such receiving, decoding, obtaining, 13 receiving, confirming the digital footprints, confirming the received digital signatures, 14 and sending steps that heightens security for transactions. 15 [o006] Other features include wherein the scannable code being provided by 16 receiving a snapshot of a quick response (QR) code. 17 [0007] Other features include wherein the wireless mobile communication device 18 is used to capture an image of the QR code. 19 [O0 8] Other features include wherein the undecoded snapshot is transferred to a 20 security server for decoding the code contents. 21 [0009] Other features include wherein the security server decodes the undecoded 22 code and verifies validity and security of the contents of the decoded code.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 4 1 [o010] Other features include wherein contents of the decoded code contain a 2 Uniform Resource Locator (URL) link that leads to a fraudulent website. 3 [0011] Other features include wherein the decoded code may compromises 4 security of a user's device by subjecting it to malicious attacks. 5 [0012] Other features include wherein the code contents of the decoded code is 6 sent to a security server to verify the validity and security of the contents. 7 [0013] Other features include wherein the contents of the decoded code is 8 determined to pose a security risk to the user device by comparing the decoded code 9 contents to black and white lists of the code contents. 10 [0014] Other features include wherein a user's wireless mobile communications 11 device redirected to a link for the wireless mobile communications device to execute the 12 link. 13 [0015] Other features include wherein based upon retrieved links being 14 determined in the decoded code as secure, a user's wireless mobile communications 1s device launches one or more of the retrieved links. 16 [o016] Other features include wherein a web hosting server responds back to a 17 security server with the requested destination of one of the retrieved links. 18 [o017] Other features include wherein the web hosting server provides a webpage 19 in response to the security server. 20 [0018] Other features include wherein contents of the webpage are provided to 21 the user's wireless mobile communications device.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 5 1 [0019] Other features include wherein based upon verifying security of the 2 decoded contents of the code, the user's wireless mobile communications device 3 executes on the decoded contents. 4 [0020] Other features include wherein the codes include item codes for products. 5 [0 0 21] Other features include wherein the user's wireless mobile communications 6 device launches a URL link to initiate a purchase request. 7 [0022] Other features include wherein the user's wireless mobile communications 8 device downloads and launches an application to initiate a purchase request. 9 [0023] Other features include wherein a webpage at the URL link requests access 10 to a wallet account on the user's wireless mobile communications device to initiate 11 payment for the purchase. 12 [0024] Other features include wherein a webpage at the URL link access to a 13 wallet account on the user's wireless mobile communications device to initiate payment 14 for the purchase. 15 [0 0 25] Other features include wherein a launched app requests access to a wallet 16 account on the user's wireless mobile communications device to initiate payment for the 17 purchase. 18 [0026] An invention can include a snap mobile security system, comprising: a 19 processor; and a memory disposed in communication with the processor and storing 20 processor-issuable instructions to: receive a request from a user's device to decode a 21 scannable code and verify the security of the decoded code's contents; decode the 22 scannable code to obtain code contents requesting access to the wallet account; obtain WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 6 1 from the user digital fingerprints of the user device and a request identifier for the 2 request to access the wallet account; receive from the access requester digital signatures 3 for the requester and the request identifier; confirm the digital fingerprints of the user 4 device verify the device is authorized to access the wallet account; confirm the received 5 digital signatures verify the access requester and the request are authorized to access the 6 wallet account; and send wallet unlock and activity unlock keys to the device for activity 7 access to the wallet. 8 [o 027] An invention can include a processor-readable non-transitory medium 9 storing processor-issuable snap mobile security instructions to: receive a request from a 1o user's device to decode a scannable code and verify the security of the decoded code's 11 contents; decode the scannable code to obtain code contents requesting access to the 12 wallet account; obtain from the user digital fingerprints of the user device and a request 13 identifier for the request to access the wallet account; receive from the access requester 14 digital signatures for the requester and the request identifier; confirm the digital 1s fingerprints of the user device verify the device is authorized to access the wallet 16 account; confirm the received digital signatures verify the access requester and the 17 request are authorized to access the wallet account; and send wallet unlock and activity 18 unlock keys to the device for activity access to the wallet. 19 [0 0 28] Any of the aforementioned features and limitations may be used in 20 combination with each other and with methods, systems, apparatuses, and computer 21 readable medium implementations.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 7 1 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS 2 [o 029] The accompanying appendices, drawings, figures, images, etc. illustrate 3 various example, non-limiting, inventive aspects, embodiments, and features ("e.g.," or 4 "example(s)") in accordance with the present disclosure: 5 [0030] FIGURE 1 shows a datagraph diagram illustrating example features of the 6 SMS verifying the security contents of decoded scannable codes; 7 [0031] FIGURE 2 shows a datagraph diagram illustrating example features of the 8 SMS validating authorization requests for access to a wallet account; 9 [0032] FIGURES 3A-B show logic flow diagrams illustrating example features of 10 the SMS verifying the security of contents of decoded scannable codes; 11 [0033] FIGURE 4 shows a logic flow diagram illustrating example features of the 12 SMS validating authorization requests for access to a wallet account; and 13 [0034] FIGURE 5 shows a block diagram illustrating examples of a SMS 14 controller. 15 [0035] The leading number of each reference number within the drawings 16 indicates the figure in which that reference number is introduced and/or detailed. As 17 such, a detailed discussion of reference number 101 would be found and/or introduced 18 in Figure 1. Reference number 201 is introduced in Figure 2, etc.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 8 1 DETAILED DESCRIPTION 2 SNAP MOBILE SECURITY (SMS) 3 [0036] The SNAP MOBILE SECURITY APPARATUSES, METHODS AND 4 SYSTEMS (hereinafter "SMS") provide verification, access and security, via SMS 5 components, to virtual wallet based electronic financial transactions. 6 [0037] FIGURE 1 shows a datagraph diagram illustrating example features of the 7 SMS verifying the security contents of decoded scannable codes. In some 8 implementations, a user 101 may take a snapshot of a scannable code such as, but not 9 limited to, a quick response (QR) code, e.g., 109. For example, the user may utilize a 10 device such as a smartphone to capture an image of the code. In some implementations, 11 the user may decode the code at the user's computing device, e.g., 11o. In some 12 implementations, the user may send the contents of the decoded code to a security 13 server 102 to verify the validity and security of the contents. In some implementations, 14 the user may decide to transfer the undecoded snapshot to the server for decoding, and 1s the security server may decode the code, e.g., 113. In such implementations, the user 16 may request 11 the security server to decode the undecoded code and verify the validity 17 and security of the contents of the decoded code, e.g., 112. In some implementations, 18 some scannable codes, though advertised as facilitators of legitimate transactions, may 19 expose users to security risks and fraud such as phishing, pharming, and/or the like. For 20 example, the contents of a nefarious decoded code may contain a Uniform Resource 21 Locator (URL) link that leads to fraudulent websites that may expose a user to 22 unwanted/unsolicited content (e.g., ads, etc), trick a user into providing sensitive 23 personal information, attempt to download unwanted/unsolicited material (e.g., WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 9 1 malicious apps, etc) onto a user's device, and/or the like. For example, the decoded code 2 may compromise the security of a user's device by subjecting it to malicious attacks such 3 as SQL injections, and/or the like. 4 [0038] In some implementations, a user's device and/or a security server may 5 decode the snapshot of a scannable code, such as, but not limited to, a QR code. An 6 example listing of a verification request mll, substantially in the form of a HTTP(S) 7 POST message including XML-formatted data, is provided below: 8 9 POST /verificationrequest.php HTTP/l.1 10 Host: www.security.com 11 Content-Type: Application/XML 12 Content-Length: 667 13 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 14 <qrverify request> 15 <timestamp>2011-04-01 :23:59:59</timestamp> 16 <transaction amount>$660.89</transaction amount> 17 <digital-sign> 18 45e2085fa20496c91df574dc5652el45 19 </digital sign> 20 <QRCodePayload> 21 <locationlink>www.phishpharm.com</locationlink> 22 <merchantid>AE783</merchantid> 23 <merchant-name>Scammer, Inc. </merchant_ name> 24 <store_id>88234</store_id> 25 <post location>6th Ave and 4 2 nd St</post_location> 26 <transaction id>AFE 1213344</transaction id> 27 </QRCodePayload> 28 //<QRCodePayload> 29 // <image data>JPEGDATA</imagedata> 30 //</QRCodePayload> 31 </qrverify request> 32 33 WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 10 1 [o039] In some implementations, the SMS may determine if the contents of the 2 decoded code pose any security risk to the user device. For example, the SMS may 3 compare the decoded code contents to black and white lists of code contents, and 4 determine if the decoded contents pose some or no security risk to user's device, 5 respectively. For example, the security server may issue PHP/SQL commands to query a 6 database table (such as FIGURE 5, Decoded Codes Contents database 519k) for 7 blacklist/whitelist code contents data. An example code contents blacklist/whitelist 8 query 114, substantially in the form of PHP/SQL commands, is provided below: 9 <?PHP 10 header('Content-Type: text/plain'); 11 mysql-connect("254.93.179.ll2",$DBserver,$password); // access database server 12 mysql_select_db("SMS_DB.SQL"); // select database table to search 13 //create query 14 $query = "SELECT blacklist whitelist FROM CodeContentsTable WHERE QRlists LIKE 15 '%' $QRCodePayload"; 16 $result = mysql-query($query); // perform the search query 17 mysqlclose("SMS_DB.SQL"); // close database access 18 ?> 19 20 [0040] In some implementations, once receiving the blacklist/whitelist of 21 scannable codes, the SMS may initiate the steps to verify the security of the decoded 22 code, e.g., 116. For example, the server may merely redirect the user to the link for the 23 user to execute the link, e.g. 117. For example, the security server may provide a 24 redirected link response to user device as a HTTP(S) POST message including XML 25 formatted data. An example listing of a redirected link response 117, substantially in the 26 form of a HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted data, is provided below: 27 28 POST /verificationresponse.php HTTP/l.1 29 Host: www.userdevice.com 30 Content-Type: Application/XML WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 ll 1 Content-Length: 667 2 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 3 <qrverify response> 4 <timestamp>2011-04-01 :23:59:59</timestamp> 5 <QRCodePayload> 6 <redirectedlink>www.verifiedlink.com</redirected link> 7 <merchant id>AE783</merchant id> 8 <merchantname>Legit Business, Inc. </merchant_ name> 9 <store_id>88234</store_id> 10 <transactionid>AFE 1213344</transaction id> 11 </QRCodePayload> 12 </qrverify response> 13 14 [0041] For example, the user may decide to launch a website, and/or download an 15 app. In some embodiments, the SMS may retrieve links found in the decoded code and 16 determine, via SMS components, the links are secure and that the user may launch the 17 URL link. For example, the server may fetch the destination of the link, e.g. 118, and 18 provide the link destination to the user, e.g., 119. For example, the server may launch the 19 URL link and open a webpage on the user's device. For example, the security server may 20 provide a webpage request to a web hosting server 104 as a HTTP(S) GET message 21 including XML-formatted data. An example listing of a webpage request 118, 22 substantially in the form of a HTTP(S) GET message including XML-formatted data, is 23 provided below: 24 25 GET /page.php/ HTTP/1.1 26 Host: www.site.com 27 User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 28 Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml; 29 Accept-Language: en-usen; 30 Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8; 31 Cookie: PHPSESSID=r2t5uvjq435r4q7ib3vtdjql20 32 WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 12 1 In some embodiments, the web hosting server may respond back to the security server 2 with the requested destination of the link. For example, the web hosting server may 3 provide a webpage in response to the security server as a HTTP(S) POST message 4 including XML-formatted data. The webpage contents may then be relayed to the user 5 120. 6 [o042] In some embodiments, the SMS may initiate the steps to verify that the 7 user of the device is in fact an authorized user, and that the device is secure, i.e., its 8 security is not compromised, e.g., 121. Upon confirming that the user is authorized, and 9 the device is secure, e.g., 130, in such embodiments, the user may execute on the 10 response received from the security server, e.g., 131. 11 [0043] FIGURE 2 shows a datagraph diagram illustrating example features of the 12 SMS validating authorization requests for access to a wallet account. In some 13 embodiments, a user may take a snapshot of a scannable code such as, but not limited to 14 a QR code, and have the user's device and/or the security server decode it. Upon 15 verifying the security of the decoded contents of the code, in some implementations, the 16 user may execute on the decoded contents. For example, the codes may be item codes 17 for products, and the user may launch a URL link, and/or download and launch an app 18 to initiate a purchase request. In some embodiments, the user may wish to provide a 19 checkout request to the merchant server 107. For example, the checkout request to the 20 merchant server may be a HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted data. An 21 example listing of a checkout request 202, substantially in the form of a HTTP(S) POST 22 message including XML-formatted data, is provided below: 23 POST /checkoutrequest.php HTTP/1.1 24 Host: www.merchant.com WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 13 1 Content-Type: Application/XML 2 Content-Length: 667 3 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 4 <QRdata> 5 <order_ID>4NFU4RG94</order_ID> 6 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:22:43</timestamp> 7 <expiry lapse>00:01:00</expiry lapse> 8 <total_cost>$74.46</total_cost> 9 <userid>john.q@gmail.com</userid> 10 <secureelement>www.merchant.com/securedyn/xyz/123.png</secureelement> 11 <merchant params> 12 <merchant id>54TBRELF8</merchant id> 13 <merchantname>BIG_APPLEBOOKSTORE</merchantname> 14 <address> 1 Piazza Square </address> 15 <city> New York </city> 16 <zip-code> 10001 </zip code> 17 <merchant auth key>TMN45GER98</merchant auth key> 18 </merchant-params> 19 <purchasedetail> 20 <cart> 21 <product> 22 <product type>book</product type> 23 <product params> 24 <producttitle>Blood Meridian</product title> 25 <ISBN>0-394-54482-X</ISBN> 26 <edition>lst ed.</edition> 27 <cover>hardbound</cover> 28 </product-params> 29 <quantity>l</quantity> 30 <unit_cost>$74.46</unitcost> 31 </product> 32 </cart> 33 </purchase detail> 34 </QRdata> 35 36 [o044] In response, in some embodiments, the merchant server may provide the 37 user with data such as, but not limited to, the transaction session I.D., access request 38 I.D., requestor I.D., and/or the like, e.g., 203. For example, the checkout response to the 39 merchant server may be a HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted data. An WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 14 1 example listing of a checkout response 203, substantially in the form of a HTTP(S) 2 POST message including XML-formatted data, is provided below: 3 POST /checkoutresponse.php HTTP/l.1 4 Host: www.userdevice.com 5 Content-Type: Application/XML 6 Content-Length: 667 7 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 8 <checkoutresponse> 9 <sessionID>4NFU4RG94</sessionID> 10 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:22:43</timestamp> 11 <total_cost>$74.46</total_cost> 12 <userid>john.q@gmail.com</userid> 13 <access auth> 14 <accessrequestID> 15 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:25:43</timestamp> 16 <amount>$74.46</amount> 17 <merchantid>54TBRELF8</merchantid> 18 <sessionID>4NFU4RG94</sessionID> 19 <consumeracct chrg access> VISA ************5634 20 </consumer acct chrg access> 21 </accessrequestID> 22 <accessrequesterID>Big Firm, Inc</ accessrequesterID> 23 <purchasedetail> 24 <cart> 25 <product> 26 <product type>book</product type> 27 <product params> 28 <producttitle>Blood Meridian</product title> 29 <ISBN>0-394-54482-X</ISBN> 30 <edition>lst ed.</edition> 31 <cover>hardbound</cover> 32 </product-params> 33 <quantity>l</quantity> 34 <unit_cost>$74.46</unitcost> 35 </product> 36 </cart> 37 </purchase detail> 38 </checkoutresponse > 39 WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 15 1 [0045] In some implementations, the webpage at the URL link and/or the 2 launched app may request access to the wallet account on the device to initiate payment 3 for the purchase, e.g., 201. In some implementations, the SMS may initiate a verification 4 process to confirm that only authorized entities have access to the wallet app. For 5 example, the SMS may verify the access requestor is authorized to access the wallet app. 6 In some implementations, the SMS may verify the validity of the checkout request, and 7 the app/webpage making the request. In some embodiments, the SMS may determine 8 that the user device from which the access request is coming from is an authorized 9 device. In some implementations, the SMS may forward the received data, along with a 1o wallet access authorization request, to the security server to verify the requester, the 11 access request, and the security of the user device. For example, the authorization 12 request may include data such as fingerprints of user's device (e.g., user agent 13 (operating systems, browsers, toolbars, etc), fonts, plugin versions, screen size and 14 resolution, time zone, and/or the like), request identifier, requester identifier, and/or 15 the like. For example, the access authorization request to the security server may be a 16 HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted data. An example listing of an access 17 authorization request 204, substantially in the form of a HTTP(S) POST message 18 including XML-formatted data, is provided below: 19 POST /accessauthorization.php HTTP/1.1 20 Host: www.securityserver.com 21 Content-Type: Application/XML 22 Content-Length: 667 23 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 24 <access auth> 25 <access requestID> 26 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:25:43</timestamp> 27 <amount>$74.46</amount> 28 <merchantid>54TBRELF8</merchant id> WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 16 1 <sessionID>4NFU4RG94</sessionID> 2 <consumer acct chrg access> VISA ************5634 3 </consumer_acctchrg access> 4 </accessrequest_ID> 5 <accessrequesterID>Big Firm, Inc</ accessrequester_ID> 6 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:22:43</timestamp> 7 <secure-element>www.merchant.com/securedyn/xyz/123.png</secure-element> 8 <device-fingerprints> 9 <OS> Windows </OS> 10 <user-agent> Mozilla </user agent> 11 <http accept info> 12 <info l> text/html </infol> 13 <info_2> application/xhtml+xml </info_2> 14 15 </ http accept info > 16 <plug-ins> 17 <FlashVersion> 11.1.102.55 </FlashVersion> 18 <AdobeReader> 10.1.2.45 </AdobeReader> 19 20 </plug ins> 21 <fonts> </fonts> 22 <screen-dim> 1920X1200X24 </screen dim> 23 </ device-fingerprints> 24 </ accessauth > 25 26 [0046] Upon receiving the access authorization request, in some 27 implementations, the security server may verify the user device is authorized to access 28 the wallet app, e.g., 205. For example, the server may calculate a total weighed overlap 29 score between the received device fingerprints and those that are whitelisted as safe. For 30 example, those attributes that have a large variety, (e.g., fonts, etc) may be weighed 31 much higher those with less variety (e.g., operating system, etc). The higher the score is 32 the more it indicates the user device belongs in the whitelist, and may be verified as a 33 device authorized to access the wallet app. In some implementations, once the user 34 device is established as an authorized device, the security server may initiate a request WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 17 1 to the merchant server to verify the access requester is authorized to access the app and 2 the request is a legitimate one, e.g., 206. For example, the security server may provide a 3 verification request for request I.D. and requester to the merchant server as a HTTP(S) 4 POST message including XML-formatted data. An example listing of a verification 5 request for request I.D. and requester 206, substantially in the form of a HTTP(S) POST 6 message including XML-formatted data, is provided below: 7 8 POST /verifyaccess.php HTTP/1.1 9 Host: www.merchant.com 10 Content-Type: Application/XML 11 Content-Length: 667 12 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 13 <accessverify> 14 <access requestID> 15 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:25:43</timestamp> 16 <amount>$74.46</amount> 17 <merchant id>54TBRELF8</merchant id> 18 <sessionID>4NFU4RG94</sessionID> 19 <consumeracctchrg access> VISA ************5634 20 </consumeracctchrg access> 21 </accessrequest_ID> 22 <access requesterID>Big Firm, Inc</ accessrequesterID> 23 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:22:43</timestamp> 24 </accessverify> 25 26 [o047] For example, the security server may query for the digital signature of the 27 requester, and a digital signature for the request identifier. Upon generating a digital 28 signature for the request identifier, e.g., 207, the merchant server may verification 29 response to the security server as a HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted 30 data. An example listing of a verification request for request I.D. and requester 208, WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 18 1 substantially in the form of a HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted data, is 2 provided below: 3 4 POST /digicert.php HTTP/l.1 5 Host: www.security.com 6 Content-Type: Application/XML 7 Content-Length: 667 8 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 9 <accessverify> 10 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:22:43</timestamp> 11 <digicert requester> 12 // DigiCert file for requester's digital certificate 13 DigiCert:: cert($data,'requester.cert'); 14 </digicert requester> 15 <digicert request> 16 // DigiCert file for for request digital signature 17 DigiCert::cert($data, 'requestid.cert); 18 </digicert request> 19 </accessverify> 20 21 [o 048] Upon receiving the digital certificates, in some embodiments, the security 22 server may determine if the request is legitimate, and the requester is authorized to 23 access the wallet app, e.g., 209. For example, with the latter, the server may compare the 24 requester's digital signature with ones in a whitelist, and determine if the requester is 25 approved. In some implementations, the server may retrieve the digital signature of the 26 request and compare the retrieved request identifier with the one received from the 27 user's device. In some implementations, once the requester and the user device are 28 verified as entities authorized to access the wallet app, and the access request is 29 confirmed as legitimate, the security server may generate a wallet access key to supply 30 210 to the user's device to unlock the wallet app, and allow the request access to the 31 wallet app. For example, the security server may provide a wallet access authorization WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 19 1 response to the user device as a HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted data. 2 An example listing of a wallet access authorization response 210, substantially in the 3 form of a HTTP(S) POST message including XML-formatted data, is provided below: 4 5 POST /accessauthorization.php HTTP/l.1 6 Host: www.merchant.com 7 Content-Type: Application/XML 8 Content-Length: 667 9 <?XML version = "1.0" encoding = "UTF-8"?> 10 <access auth> 11 <walletaccess> TRUE </walletaccess> 12 <timestamp>2035-02-22 15:25:43</timestamp> 13 <authorization id>KJ789BJK90743GJH</authorization id> 14 <sessionID>4NFU4RG94</sessionID> 15 <wallet key>54TBRELF8</wallet key> 16 <action key>4NFU4RG94</action key> 17 </accessauth> 18 19 For example, the webpage and/or the app that requested access to the wallet app may 20 launch the wallet app to initiate the payment process, e.g., 212. 21 [o049] FIGURES 3A-B show logic flow diagrams illustrating example features of 22 the SMS verifying the security of contents of decoded scannable codes. With reference to 23 FIGURE 3A, in some embodiments, a user's device may capture a snapshot of a 24 scannable code such as, but not limited to, a QR code, and send, e.g., 301, the 25 undecoded code to a security server for decoding, e.g., 302. In some embodiments, the 26 user's device may decode the snapshot, e.g., 303, and send the decoded contents to the 27 security server. In some implementations, the security server may parse through the 28 decoded code contents, and collect the signatures of the code such as, but not limited to, 29 the origin of the code, the placement (e.g., public street, merchant location, etc), links in WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 20 1 the code, number of items, amounts, and/or the like, e.g., 304. In some 2 implementations, the server may query the decoded code contents database (such as 3 FIGURE 5, Decoded Code Contents 519k) for lists of decoded code contents that belong 4 to a whitelist, and to a blacklist, e.g., 306 to determine the whitelist/blacklist status of 5 the contents of the decoded code, e.g., 305. For example, the server may check if the 6 origin of the code is blacklisted 309, any of the destinations (e.g., links, etc) are 7 blacklisted 310 and/or whitelisted 311, etc. In some embodiments, one, some or all 8 decoded contents may be blacklisted, and the server may generate a message 9 announcing to the device user that the code is compromised and not to be trusted, e.g., 10 314. In some embodiments, the destinations may not be in a blacklist, but there may be 11 contents at the link that are blacklisted, e.g., 313. For example, the link may contain a 12 blacklisted app. In these embodiments, the server may generate a message announcing 13 to the device user that the code is compromised and not to be trusted, e.g., 314. 14 [0 050] With reference to FIGURE 3B, in some implementations, the security 1s server may determine the location of the code from parsing through the decoded 16 contents, e.g., 315, and compare that to the location at which the snapped code was 17 found at, e.g., 316. For example, the location of the decoded code as gleaned from the 18 decoded contents may be compared to the GPS position of the device when the snapshot 19 was taken. In some implementations, the two locations may not match, suggesting that 20 the decoded code should not have been at the location and may be fraudulent. For 21 example, a fraudulent QR code may have been placed over a legitimate one, in a "attack 22 in-the-middle" scenario. In these implementations, the server may contact the device 23 user with a message that the code is compromised, e.g., 321. In some implementations, 24 the decoded code may attempt to download an app, e.g., 318, and/or request access to WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 21 1 the functionalities of the device (e.g., contact lists, email access, texting, apps, etc), e.g., 2 317. In some implementations, the server may discover the activities of the decoded 3 code may signal security compromise. For example, a vulnerability scanning session 4 may discover signs of attacks such as command injections, etc, scams such as phishing, 5 pharming, etc, e.g., 320. In these embodiments, the security server may contact the 6 device user to warn that the snapped code's security is compromised, e.g., 321. 7 [o0 51] FIGURE 4 shows a logic flow diagram illustrating example features of the 8 SMS validating authorization requests for access to a wallet account. In some 9 implementations, the security server may obtain from the user's device data on the 10 device's fingerprints, e.g., 401a. For example, the data may include user agent 11 (operating systems, browsers, toolbars, etc), fonts, plugin versions, screen dimensions 12 and resolution, time zones, and/or the like. In some embodiments, the security server 13 may receive from the merchant server a digital signature of the wallet access requester. 14 In some embodiments, the merchant server may generate an encrypted digital signature 1s certificate for the access request identifier, and pass along the digital signature to the 16 security server, e.g., 401b. Upon obtaining the device fingerprints, in some 17 implementations, the security server may generate a query from a database table (such 18 as FIGURE 5, Devices 519b) for a list of essential attributes every authorized device 19 should have, and likewise non-grata attributes any of which will result in a device being 20 blocked from accessing the wallet account. In some implementations, the server may 21 ascertain all the essential attributes of the received device fingerprints match the 22 corresponding essential attributes from the query, and no attribute matches the non 23 grata attributes, e.g., 406. For example, if only mobile devices are authorized to access 24 the wallet account (i.e. large screens are non-grata), the security server may ascertain WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 22 1 that the received device fingerprints show, to some predetermined confidence level, that 2 the device is a mobile (i.e., small screen) device. In these embodiments, if the device is 3 found to not satisfy this condition, despite matching all the other attributes in the 4 whitelist, the SMS may suspend the wallet app on the device and contact the account 5 owner to communicate the security risk, e.g., 409. In some implementations, the device 6 may satisfy the condition, and the server may resort to calculating the overall 7 commonalities of the received device fingerprints and the fingerprints identified in the 8 whitelist, e.g., 407. For example, if the commonalities (i.e. overlap) exceed some 9 threshold, the server may recognize the device as authorized to access the wallet 1o account. 11 [0 052] With the user's device recognized as an authorized device to access the 12 wallet account, in some implementations, the security server may determine if the 13 received digital signatures for the access requester and the request identifier are 14 legitimate. In some embodiments, the server may generate a query to a database table 1s (such as FIGURE 5, Digital Signatures 519m) for the whitelist of digital signatures of the 16 access requesters, e.g., 410. For example, if the received digital signature of the 17 requester matches any in the whitelist, the server may decide the requester is legitimate, 18 e.g., 413. With the verification of the requester accomplished, in some implementations, 19 the security server may retrieve 414 the access request identifier from the digital 20 signature certificate, and compare the identifier to the one received from the user 21 device, e.g., 415. If there is a match, the server may generate a wallet account access key 22 to grant the requester access to the wallet app on the user's device, e.g., 417.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 23 1 SMS Controller 2 [0053] FIGURE 5 shows a block diagram illustrating examples of a SMS 3 controller 501. In this embodiment, the SMS controller 501 may serve to aggregate, 4 process, store, search, serve, identify, instruct, generate, match, and/or facilitate 5 interactions with a computer through various technologies, and/or other related data. 6 [0054] Users, e.g., 533a, which may be people and/or other systems, may engage 7 information technology systems (e.g., computers) to facilitate information processing. 8 In turn, computers employ processors to process information; such processors 503 may 9 be referred to as central processing units (CPU). One form of processor is referred to as 10 a microprocessor. CPUs use communicative circuits to pass binary encoded signals 11 acting as instructions to enable various operations. These instructions may be 12 operational and/or data instructions containing and/or referencing other instructions 13 and data in various processor accessible and operable areas of memory 529 (e.g., 14 registers, cache memory, random access memory, etc.). Such communicative 1s instructions may be stored and/or transmitted in batches (e.g., batches of instructions) 16 as programs and/or data components to facilitate desired operations. These stored 17 instruction codes, e.g., programs, may engage the CPU circuit components and other 18 motherboard and/or system components to perform desired operations. One type of 19 program is a computer operating system, which, may be executed by CPU on a 20 computer; the operating system enables and facilitates users to access and operate 21 computer information technology and resources. Some resources that may be employed 22 in information technology systems include: input and output mechanisms through 23 which data may pass into and out of a computer; memory storage into which data may WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 24 1 be saved; and processors by which information may be processed. These information 2 technology systems may be used to collect data for later retrieval, analysis, and 3 manipulation, which may be facilitated through a database program. These information 4 technology systems provide interfaces that allow users to access and operate various 5 system components. 6 [0055] In one embodiment, the SMS controller 501 may be connected to and/or 7 communicate with entities such as, but not limited to: one or more users from user 8 input devices 511; peripheral devices 512; an optional cryptographic processor device 9 528; and/or a communications network 513. For example, the SMS controller 501 may 10 be connected to and/or communicate with users, e.g., 533a, operating client device(s), 11 e.g., 533b, including, but not limited to, personal computer(s), server(s) and/or various 12 mobile device(s) including, but not limited to, cellular telephone(s), smartphone(s) (e.g., 13 iPhone®, Blackberry®, Android OS-based phones etc.), tablet computer(s) (e.g., Apple 14 iPadTM, HP SlateTM, Motorola XoomTM, etc.), eBook reader(s) (e.g., Amazon KindleTM 1s Barnes and Noble's NookTM eReader, etc.), laptop computer(s), notebook(s), netbook(s), 16 gaming console(s) (e.g., XBOX Live T M , Nintendo® DS, Sony PlayStation® Portable, 17 etc.), portable scanner(s), and/or the like. 18 [0056] Networks are commonly thought to comprise the interconnection and 19 interoperation of clients, servers, and intermediary nodes in a graph topology. It should 20 be noted that the term "server" as used throughout this application refers generally to a 21 computer, other device, program, or combination thereof that processes and responds to 22 the requests of remote users across a communications network. Servers serve their 23 information to requesting "clients." The term "client" as used herein refers generally to a WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 25 1 computer, program, other device, user and/or combination thereof that is capable of 2 processing and making requests and obtaining and processing any responses from 3 servers across a communications network. A computer, other device, program, or 4 combination thereof that facilitates, processes information and requests, and/or 5 furthers the passage of information from a source user to a destination user is 6 commonly referred to as a "node." Networks are generally thought to facilitate the 7 transfer of information from source points to destinations. A node specifically tasked 8 with furthering the passage of information from a source to a destination is commonly 9 called a "router." There are many forms of networks such as Local Area Networks 10 (LANs), Pico networks, Wide Area Networks (WANs), Wireless Networks (WLANs), etc. 11 For example, the Internet is generally accepted as being an interconnection of a 12 multitude of networks whereby remote clients and servers may access and interoperate 13 with one another. 14 [0057] The SMS controller 501 may be based on computer systems that may 1s comprise, but are not limited to, components such as: a computer systemization 502 16 connected to memory 529. 17 Computer Systemization 18 [oo58] A computer systemization 502 may comprise a clock 530, central 19 processing unit ("CPU(s)" and/or "processor(s)" (these terms are used interchangeably 20 throughout the disclosure unless noted to the contrary)) 503, a memory 529 (e.g., a read 21 only memory (ROM) 5o6, a random access memory (RAM) 505, etc.), and/or an 22 interface bus 507, and most frequently, although not necessarily, are all interconnected 23 and/or communicating through a system bus 504 on one or more (mother)board(s) 502 WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 26 1 having conductive and/or otherwise transportive circuit pathways through which 2 instructions (e.g., binary encoded signals) may travel to effectuate communications, 3 operations, storage, etc. The computer systemization may be connected to a power 4 source 586; e.g., optionally the power source may be internal. Optionally, a 5 cryptographic processor 526 and/or transceivers (e.g., ICs) 574 may be connected to the 6 system bus. In another embodiment, the cryptographic processor and/or transceivers 7 may be connected as either internal and/or external peripheral devices 512 via the 8 interface bus I/O. In turn, the transceivers may be connected to antenna(s) 575, thereby 9 effectuating wireless transmission and reception of various communication and/or 10 sensor protocols; for example the antenna(s) may connect to: a Texas Instruments 11 WiLink WL1283 transceiver chip (e.g., providing 802.11n, Bluetooth 3.0, FM, global 12 positioning system (GPS) (thereby allowing SMS controller to determine its location)); 13 Broadcom BCM4329FKUBG transceiver chip (e.g., providing 802.11n, Bluetooth 2.1 + 14 EDR, FM, etc.), BCM28150 (HSPA+) and BCM2076 (Bluetooth 4.0, GPS, etc.); a 1s Broadcom BCM475oIUB8 receiver chip (e.g., GPS); an Infineon Technologies X-Gold 16 618-PMB9800 (e.g., providing 2G/3G HSDPA/HSUPA communications); Intel's XMM 17 7160 (LTE & DC-HSPA), Qualcom's CDMA(2000), Mobile Data/Station Modem, 18 Snapdragon; and/or the like. The system clock may have a crystal oscillator and 19 generates a base signal through the computer systemization's circuit pathways. The 20 clock may be coupled to the system bus and various clock multipliers that will increase 21 or decrease the base operating frequency for other components interconnected in the 22 computer systemization. The clock and various components in a computer 23 systemization drive signals embodying information throughout the system. Such 24 transmission and reception of instructions embodying information throughout a WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 27 1 computer systemization may be referred to as communications. These communicative 2 instructions may further be transmitted, received, and the cause of return and/or reply 3 communications beyond the instant computer systemization to: communications 4 networks, input devices, other computer systemizations, peripheral devices, and/or the 5 like. It should be understood that in alternative embodiments, any of the above 6 components may be connected directly to one another, connected to the CPU, and/or 7 organized in numerous variations employed as exemplified by various computer 8 systems. 9 [o059] The CPU comprises at least one high-speed data processor adequate to 1o execute program components for executing user and/or system-generated requests. 11 Often, the processors themselves will incorporate various specialized processing units, 12 such as, but not limited to: floating point units, integer processing units, integrated 13 system (bus) controllers, logic operating units, memory management control units, etc. 14 and even specialized processing sub-units like graphics processing units, digital signal 1s processing units, and/or the like. Additionally, processors may include internal fast 16 access addressable memory, and be capable of mapping and addressing memory 529 17 beyond the processor itself; internal memory may include, but is not limited to: fast 18 registers, various levels of cache memory (e.g., level 1, 2, 3, etc.), RAM, etc. The 19 processor may access this memory through the use of a memory address space that is 20 accessible via instruction address, which the processor can construct and decode 21 allowing it to access a circuit path to a specific memory address space having a memory 22 state/value. The CPU may be a microprocessor such as: AMD's Athlon, Duron and/or 23 Opteron; ARM's classic (e.g., ARM7/9/11), embedded (Coretx-M/R), application 24 (Cortex-A), and secure processors; IBM and/or Motorola's DragonBall and PowerPC; WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 28 1 IBM's and Sony's Cell processor; Intel's Atom, Celeron (Mobile), Core (2/Duo/i3/i5/i7), 2 Itanium, Pentium, Xeon, and/or XScale; and/or the like processor(s). The CPU interacts 3 with memory through instruction passing through conductive and/or transportive 4 conduits (e.g., (printed) electronic and/or optic circuits) to execute stored instructions 5 (i.e., program code). Such instruction passing facilitates communication within the SMS 6 controller and beyond through various interfaces. Should processing requirements 7 dictate a greater amount speed and/or capacity, distributed processors (e.g., Distributed 8 SMS), mainframe, multi-core, parallel, and/or super-computer architectures may 9 similarly be employed.Alternatively, should deployment requirements dictate greater 10 portability, smaller mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, Personal Digital Assistants 11 (PDAs), etc.) may be employed. 12 [o06o] Depending on the particular implementation, features of the SMS may be 13 achieved by implementing a microcontroller such as CAST's R8051XC2 microcontroller; 14 Intel's MCS 51 (i.e., 8051 microcontroller); and/or the like. Also, to implement certain 1s features of the SMS, some feature implementations may rely on embedded components, 16 such as: Application-Specific Integrated Circuit ("ASIC"), Digital Signal Processing 17 ("DSP"), Field Programmable Gate Array ("FPGA"), and/or the like embedded 18 technology. For example, any of the SMS component collection (distributed or 19 otherwise) and/or features may be implemented via the microprocessor and/or via 20 embedded components; e.g., via ASIC, coprocessor, DSP, FPGA, and/or the like. 21 Alternately, some implementations of the SMS may be implemented with embedded 22 components that are configured and used to achieve a variety of features or signal 23 processing.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 29 1 [o061] Depending on the particular implementation, the embedded components 2 may include software solutions, hardware solutions, and/or some combination of both 3 hardware/software solutions. For example, SMS features discussed herein may be 4 achieved through implementing FPGAs, which are a semiconductor devices containing 5 programmable logic components called "logic blocks", and programmable 6 interconnects, such as the high performance FPGA Virtex series and/or the low cost 7 Spartan series manufactured by Xilinx. Logic blocks and interconnects can be 8 programmed by the customer or designer, after the FPGA is manufactured, to 9 implement any of the SMS features. A hierarchy of programmable interconnects allow 10 logic blocks to be interconnected as needed by the SMS system designer/administrator, 11 somewhat like a one-chip programmable breadboard. An FPGA's logic blocks can be 12 programmed to perform the operation of basic logic gates such as AND, and XOR, or 13 more complex combinational operators such as decoders or simple mathematical 14 operations. In most FPGAs, the logic blocks also include memory elements, which may 1s be circuit flip-flops or more complete blocks of memory. In some circumstances, the 16 SMS may be developed on regular FPGAs and then migrated into a fixed version that 17 more resembles ASIC implementations. Alternate or coordinating implementations may 18 migrate SMS controller features to a final ASIC instead of or in addition to FPGAs. 19 Depending on the implementation all of the aforementioned embedded components and 20 microprocessors may be considered the "CPU" and/or "processor" for the SMS. 21 Power Source 22 [0062] The power source 586 may be of any standard form for powering small 23 electronic circuit board devices such as the following power cells: alkaline, lithium WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 30 1 hydride, lithium ion, lithium polymer, nickel cadmium, solar cells, and/or the like. 2 Other types of AC or DC power sources may be used as well. In the case of solar cells, in 3 one embodiment, the case provides an aperture through which the solar cell may 4 capture photonic energy. The power cell 586 is connected to at least one of the 5 interconnected subsequent components of the SMS thereby providing an electric 6 current to all ther interconnected components. In one example, the power source 586 is 7 connected to the system bus component 504. In an alternative embodiment, an outside 8 power source 586 is provided through a connection across the I/O 508 interface. For 9 example, a USB and/or IEEE 1394 connection carries both data and power across the 10 connection and is therefore a suitable source of power. 11 Interface Adapters 12 [0063] Interface bus(ses) 507 may accept, connect, and/or communicate to a 13 number of interface adapters, frequently, although not necessarily in the form of 14 adapter cards, such as but not limited to: input output interfaces (I/O) 508, storage 1s interfaces 509, network interfaces 510, and/or the like. Optionally, cryptographic 16 processor interfaces 527 similarly may be connected to the interface bus. The interface 17 bus provides for the communications of interface adapters with one another as well as 18 with other components of the computer systemization. Interface adapters are adapted 19 for a compatible interface bus. Interface adapters may connect to the interface bus via 20 an expansion and/or slot architecture. Various exapansion and/or slot architectures that 21 be employed, such as, but not limited to: Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP), Card Bus, 22 ExpressCard, (Extended) Industry Standard Architecture ((E)ISA), Micro Channel 23 Architecture (MCA), NuBus, Peripheral Component Interconnect (Extended) (PCI(X)), WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 31 1 PCI Express, Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA), 2 Thunderbolt, and/or the like. 3 [o064] Storage interfaces 509 may accept, communicate, and/or connect to a 4 number of storage devices such as, but not limited to: storage devices 514, removable 5 disc devices, and/or the like. Storage interfaces may employ connection protocols such 6 as, but not limited to: (Ultra) (Serial) Advanced Technology Attachment (Packet 7 Interface) ((Ultra) (Serial) ATA(PI)), (Enhanced) Integrated Drive Electronics ((E)IDE), 8 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1394, Ethernet, fiber channel, 9 Small Computer Systems Interface (SCSI), Thunderbolt, Universal Serial Bus (USB), 10 and/or the like. 11 [0065] Network interfaces 510 may accept, communicate, and/or connect to a 12 communications network 513. Through a communications network 513, the SMS 13 controller is accessible through remote clients 533b (e.g., computers with web browsers) 14 by users 533a. Network interfaces may employ connection protocols such as, but not 1s limited to: direct connect, Ethernet (thick, thin, twisted pair 10/100/1000 Base T, 16 and/or the like), Token Ring, wireless connection such as IEEE 802.n1a-x, and/or the 17 like. Should processing requirements dictate a greater amount speed and/or capacity, 18 distributed network controllers (e.g., Distributed SMS), architectures may similarly be 19 employed to pool, load balance, and/or otherwise increase the communicative 20 bandwidth required by the SMS controller. A communications network may be any one 21 and/or the combination of the following: a direct interconnection; the Internet; a Local 22 Area Network (LAN); a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN); an Operating Missions as 23 Nodes on the Internet (OMNI); a secured custom connection; a Wide Area Network WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 32 1 (WAN); a wireless network (e.g., employing protocols such as, but not limited to a 2 Wireless Application Protocol (WAP), I-mode, and/or the like); and/or the like. A 3 network interface may be regarded as a specialized form of an input output interface. 4 Further, multiple network interfaces 510 may be used to engage with various 5 communications network types 513. For example, multiple network interfaces may be 6 employed to allow for the communication over broadcast, multicast, and/or unicast 7 networks. 8 [o066] Input Output interfaces (I/O) 508 may accept, communicate, and/or 9 connect to user input devices 511, peripheral devices 512, cryptographic processor 10 devices 528, and/or the like. I/O may employ connection protocols such as, but not 11 limited to: audio: analog, digital, monaural, RCA, stereo, and/or the like; data: Apple 12 Desktop Bus (ADB), Bluetooth, IEEE 1394a-b, serial, universal serial bus (USB); 13 infrared; joystick; keyboard; midi; optical; PC AT; PS/2; parallel; radio; video interface: 14 Apple Desktop Connector (ADC), BNC, coaxial, component, composite, digital, 1s DisplayPort, Digital Visual Interface (DVI), high-definition multimedia interface 16 (HDMI), RCA, RF antennae, S-Video, VGA, and/or the like; wireless transceivers: 17 802.na/b/g/n/x; Bluetooth; cellular (e.g., code division multiple access (CDMA), high 18 speed packet access (HSPA(+)), high-speed downlink packet access (HSDPA), global 19 system for mobile communications (GSM), long term evolution (LTE), WiMax, etc.); 20 and/or the like. One output device may be a video display, which may take the form of a 21 Cathode Ray Tube (CRT), Liquid Crystal Display (LCD), Light Emitting Diode (LED), 22 Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED), Plasma, and/or the like based monitor with an 23 interface (e.g., VGA, DVI circuitry and cable) that accepts signals from a video interface. 24 The video interface composites information generated by a computer systemization and WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 33 1 generates video signals based on the composited information in a video memory frame. 2 Another output device is a television set, which accepts signals from a video interface. 3 Often, the video interface provides the composited video information through a video 4 connection interface that accepts a video display interface (e.g., an RCA composite video 5 connector accepting an RCA composite video cable; a DVI connector accepting a DVI 6 display cable, HDMI, etc.). 7 [o o67] User input devices 511 often are a type of peripheral device 512 (see below) 8 and may include: card readers, dongles, finger print readers, gloves, graphics tablets, 9 joysticks, keyboards, microphones, mouse (mice), remote controls, retina readers, touch 10 screens (e.g., capacitive, resistive, etc.), trackballs, trackpads, sensors (e.g., 11 accelerometers, ambient light, GPS, gyroscopes, proximity, etc.), styluses, and/or the 12 like. 13 [O068] Peripheral devices 512 may be connected and/or communicate to I/O 14 and/or other facilities of the like such as network interfaces, storage interfaces, directly 1s to the interface bus, system bus, the CPU, and/or the like. Peripheral devices may be 16 external, internal and/or part of the SMS controller. Peripheral devices may include: 17 antenna, audio devices (e.g., line-in, line-out, microphone input, speakers, etc.), 18 cameras (e.g., still, video, webcam, etc.), dongles (e.g., for copy protection, ensuring 19 secure transactions with a digital signature, and/or the like), external processors (for 20 added capabilities; e.g., crypto devices 528), force-feedback devices (e.g., vibrating 21 motors), near field communication (NFC) devices, network interfaces, printers, radio 22 frequency identifiers (RFIDs), scanners, storage devices, transceivers (e.g., cellular, 23 GPS, etc.), video devices (e.g., goggles, monitors, etc.), video sources, visors, and/or the WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 34 1 like. Peripheral devices often include types of input devices (e.g., microphones, cameras, 2 etc.). 3 [o 069] It should be noted that although user input devices and peripheral devices 4 may be employed, the SMS controller may be embodied as an embedded, dedicated, 5 and/or monitor-less (i.e., headless) device, wherein access would be provided over a 6 network interface connection. 7 [0070] Cryptographic units such as, but not limited to, microcontrollers, 8 processors 526, interfaces 527, and/or devices 528 may be attached, and/or 9 communicate with the SMS controller. A MC68HC16 microcontroller, manufactured by 10 Motorola Inc., may be used for and/or within cryptographic units. The MC68HC16 11 microcontroller utilizes a 16-bit multiply-and-accumulate instruction in the 16 MHz 12 configuration and requires less than one second to perform a 512-bit RSA private key 13 operation. Cryptographic units support the authentication of communications from 14 interacting agents, as well as allowing for anonymous transactions. Cryptographic units 1s may also be configured as part of the CPU. Equivalent microcontrollers and/or 16 processors may also be used. Other commercially available specialized cryptographic 17 processors include: the Broadcom's CryptoNetX and other Security Processors; 18 nCipher's nShield (e.g., Solo, Connect, etc.), SafeNet's Luna PCI (e.g., 7100) series; 19 Semaphore Communications' 40 MHz Roadrunner 184; sMIP's (e.g., 208956); Sun's 20 Cryptographic Accelerators (e.g., Accelerator 6ooo PCIe Board, Accelerator 500 21 Daughtercard); / (e.g., L2100, L2200, U2400) line, which is capable of performing 22 500+ MB/s of cryptographic instructions; VLSI Technology's 33 MHz 6868; and/or the 23 like.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 35 1 Memory 2 [o 071] Generally, any mechanization and/or embodiment allowing a processor to 3 affect the storage and/or retrieval of information is regarded as memory 529. However, 4 memory is a fungible technology and resource, thus, any number of memory 5 embodiments may be employed in lieu of or in concert with one another. It is to be 6 understood that the SMS controller and/or a computer systemization may employ 7 various forms of memory 529. For example, a computer systemization may be 8 configured wherein the operation of on-chip CPU memory (e.g., registers), RAM, ROM, 9 and any other storage devices are provided by a paper punch tape or paper punch card 1o mechanism; however, such an embodiment would result in an extremely slow rate of 11 operation. In one configuration, memory 529 will include ROM 5o6, RAM 505, and a 12 storage device 514. A storage device 514 may employ any number of computer storage 13 devices/systems. Storage devices may include a drum; a (fixed and/or removable) 14 magnetic disk drive; a magneto-optical drive; an optical drive (i.e., Blueray, CD 15 ROM/RAM/Recordable (R)/ReWritable (RW), DVD R/RW, HD DVD R/RW etc.); an 16 array of devices (e.g., Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID)); solid state 17 memory devices (USB memory, solid state drives (SSD), etc.); other processor-readable 18 storage mediums; and/or other devices of the like. Thus, a computer systemization 19 generally requires and makes use of memory. 20 Component Collection 21 [0072] The memory 529 may contain a collection of program and/or database 22 components and/or data such as, but not limited to: operating system component(s) 515 23 (operating system); information server component(s) 516 (information server); user WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 36 1 interface component(s) 517 (user interface); Web browser component(s) 518 (Web 2 browser); database(s) 519; mail server component(s) 521; mail client component(s) 522; 3 cryptographic server component(s) 520 (cryptographic server); the SMS component(s) 4 535; and/or the like (i.e., collectively a component collection). These components may 5 be stored and accessed from the storage devices and/or from storage devices accessible 6 through an interface bus. Although non-conventional program components such as 7 those in the component collection, may be stored in a local storage device 514, they may 8 also be loaded and/or stored in memory such as: peripheral devices, RAM, remote 9 storage facilities through a communications network, ROM, various forms of memory, 10 and/or the like. 11 Operating System 12 [0073] The operating system component 515 is an executable program component 13 facilitating the operation of the SMS controller. The operating system may facilitate 14 access of I/O, network interfaces, peripheral devices, storage devices, and/or the like. 1s The operating system may be a highly fault tolerant, scalable, and secure system such as: 16 Apple Macintosh OS X (Server); AT&T Plan 9; Be OS; Unix and Unix-like system 17 distributions (such as AT&T's UNIX; Berkley Software Distribution (BSD) variations 18 such as FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, and/or the like; Linux distributions such as Red 19 Hat, Ubuntu, and/or the like); and/or the like operating systems. However, more 20 limited and/or less secure operating systems also may be employed such as Apple 21 Macintosh OS, IBM OS/2, Microsoft DOS, Microsoft Windows 22 2000/2003/3.1/95/98/CE/Millenium/NT/Vista/XP (Server), Palm OS, and/or the like. 23 In addition, emobile operating systems such as Apple's iOS, Google's Android, Hewlett WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 37 1 Packard's WebOS, Microsofts Windows Mobile, and/or the like may be employed. Any 2 of these operating systems may be embedded within the hardware of the SMS controller, 3 and/or stored/loaded into memory/storage. An operating system may communicate to 4 and/or with other components in a component collection, including itself, and/or the 5 like. Most frequently, the operating system communicates with other program 6 components, user interfaces, and/or the like. For example, the operating system may 7 contain, communicate, generate, obtain, and/or provide program component, system, 8 user, and/or data communications, requests, and/or responses. The operating system, 9 once executed by the CPU, may enable the interaction with communications networks, 10 data, I/0, peripheral devices, program components, memory, user input devices, and/or 11 the like. The operating system may provide communications protocols that allow the 12 SMS controller to communicate with other entities through a communications network 13 513. Various communication protocols may be used by the SMS controller as a 14 subcarrier transport mechanism for interaction, such as, but not limited to: multicast, 1s TCP/IP, UDP, unicast, and/or the like. 16 Information Server 17 [o 074] An information server component 516 is a stored program component that 18 is executed by a CPU. The information server may be an Internet information server 19 such as, but not limited to Apache Software Foundation's Apache, Microsoft's Internet 20 Information Server, and/or the like. The information server may allow for the execution 21 of program components through facilities such as Active Server Page (ASP), ActiveX, 22 (ANSI) (Objective-) C (++), C# and/or .NET, Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts, 23 dynamic (D) hypertext markup language (HTML), FLASH, Java, JavaScript, Practical WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 38 1 Extraction Report Language (PERL), Hypertext Pre-Processor (PHP), pipes, Python, 2 wireless application protocol (WAP), WebObjects, and/or the like. The information 3 server may support secure communications protocols such as, but not limited to, File 4 Transfer Protocol (FTP); HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP); Secure Hypertext 5 Transfer Protocol (HTTPS), Secure Socket Layer (SSL), messaging protocols (e.g., 6 America Online (AOL) Instant Messenger (AIM), Apple's iMessage, Application 7 Exchange (APEX), ICQ, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Microsoft Network (MSN) 8 Messenger Service, Presence and Instant Messaging Protocol (PRIM), Internet 9 Engineering Task Force's (IETF's) Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), SIP for Instant 10 Messaging and Presence Leveraging Extensions (SIMPLE), open XML-based Extensible 11 Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) (i.e., Jabber or Open Mobile Alliance's 12 (OMA's) Instant Messaging and Presence Service (IMPS)), Yahoo! Instant Messenger 13 Service, and/or the like. The information server provides results in the form of Web 14 pages to Web browsers, and allows for the manipulated generation of the Web pages 1s through interaction with other program components. After a Domain Name System 16 (DNS) resolution portion of an HTTP request is resolved to a particular information 17 server, the information server resolves requests for information at specified locations on 18 the SMS controller based on the remainder of the HTTP request. For example, a request 19 such as http://123.124.125.126/myInformation.html might have the IP portion of the 20 request "123.124.125.126" resolved by a DNS server to an information server at that IP 21 address; that information server might in turn further parse the http request for the 22 "/myInformation.html" portion of the request and resolve it to a location in memory 23 containing the information "myInformation.html." Additionally, other information 24 serving protocols may be employed across various ports, e.g., FTP communications WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 39 1 across port 21, and/or the like. An information server may communicate to and/or with 2 other components in a component collection, including itself, and/or facilities of the 3 like. Most frequently, the information server communicates with the SMS database 519, 4 operating systems, other program components, user interfaces, Web browsers, and/or 5 the like. 6 [0075] Access to the SMS database may be achieved through a number of 7 database bridge mechanisms such as through scripting languages as enumerated below 8 (e.g., CGI) and through inter-application communication channels as enumerated below 9 (e.g., CORBA, WebObjects, etc.). Any data requests through a Web browser are parsed 1o through the bridge mechanism into appropriate grammars as required by the SMS. In 11 one embodiment, the information server would provide a Web form accessible by a Web 12 browser. Entries made into supplied fields in the Web form are tagged as having been 13 entered into the particular fields, and parsed as such. The entered terms are then passed 14 along with the field tags, which act to instruct the parser to generate queries directed to 1s appropriate tables and/or fields. In one embodiment, the parser may generate queries in 16 standard SQL by instantiating a search string with the proper join/select commands 17 based on the tagged text entries, wherein the resulting command is provided over the 18 bridge mechanism to the SMS as a query. Upon generating query results from the query, 19 the results are passed over the bridge mechanism, and may be parsed for formatting and 20 generation of a new results Web page by the bridge mechanism. Such a new results Web 21 page is then provided to the information server, which may supply it to the requesting 22 Web browser.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 40 1 [0076] Also, an information server may contain, communicate, generate, obtain, 2 and/or provide program component, system, user, and/or data communications, 3 requests, and/or responses. 4 User Interface 5 [0077] Computer interfaces in some respects are similar to automobile operation 6 interfaces. Automobile operation interface elements such as steering wheels, gearshifts, 7 and speedometers facilitate the access, operation, and display of automobile resources, 8 and status. Computer interaction interface elements such as check boxes, cursors, 9 menus, scrollers, and windows (collectively and commonly referred to as widgets) 1o similarly facilitate the access, capabilities, operation, and display of data and computer 11 hardware and operating system resources, and status. Operation interfaces are 12 commonly called user interfaces. Graphical user interfaces (GUIs) such as the Apple 13 Macintosh Operating System's Aqua and iOS's Cocoa Touch, IBM's OS/2, Google's 14 Android Mobile UI, Microsoft's Windows 15 2000/2003/3.1/95/98/CE/Millenium/Mobile/NT/XP/Vista/7/8 (i.e., Aero, Metro), 16 Unix's X-Windows (e.g., which may include additional Unix graphic interface libraries 17 and layers such as K Desktop Environment (KDE), mythTV and GNU Network Object 18 Model Environment (GNOME)), web interface libraries (e.g., ActiveX, AJAX, (D)HTML, 19 FLASH, Java, JavaScript, etc. interface libraries such as, but not limited to, Dojo, 20 jQuery(UI), MooTools, Prototype, script.aculo.us, SWFObject, Yahoo! User Interface, 21 any of which may be used and) provide a baseline and means of accessing and 22 displaying information graphically to users.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 41 1 [0078] A user interface component 517 is a stored program component that is 2 executed by a CPU. The user interface may be a graphic user interface as provided by, 3 with, and/or atop operating systems and/or operating environments such as already 4 discussed. The user interface may allow for the display, execution, interaction, 5 manipulation, and/or operation of program components and/or system facilities 6 through textual and/or graphical facilities. The user interface provides a facility through 7 which users may affect, interact, and/or operate a computer system. A user interface 8 may communicate to and/or with other components in a component collection, 9 including itself, and/or facilities of the like. Most frequently, the user interface 1o communicates with operating systems, other program components, and/or the like. The 11 user interface may contain, communicate, generate, obtain, and/or provide program 12 component, system, user, and/or data communications, requests, and/or responses. 13 Web Browser 14 [0079] A Web browser component 518 is a stored program component that is 1s executed by a CPU. The Web browser may be a hypertext viewing application such as 16 Google's (Mobile) Chrome, Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator, Apple's 17 (Mobile) Safari, embedded web browser objects such as through Apple's Cocoa (Touch) 18 object class, and/or the like. Secure Web browsing may be supplied with 128bit (or 19 greater) encryption by way of HTTPS, SSL, and/or the like. Web browsers allowing for 20 the execution of program components through facilities such as ActiveX, AJAX, 21 (D)HTML, FLASH, Java, JavaScript, web browser plug-in APIs (e.g., Chrome, FireFox, 22 Internet Explorer, Safari Plug-in, and/or the like APIs), and/or the like. Web browsers 23 and like information access tools may be integrated into PDAs, cellular telephones, WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 42 1 smartphones, and/or other mobile devices. A Web browser may communicate to and/or 2 with other components in a component collection, including itself, and/or facilities of 3 the like. Most frequently, the Web browser communicates with information servers, 4 operating systems, integrated program components (e.g., plug-ins), and/or the like; e.g., 5 it may contain, communicate, generate, obtain, and/or provide program component, 6 system, user, and/or data communications, requests, and/or responses. Also, in place of 7 a Web browser and information server, a combined application may be developed to 8 perform similar operations of both. The combined application would similarly effect the 9 obtaining and the provision of information to users, user agents, and/or the like from 10 the SMS equipped nodes. The combined application may be nugatory on systems 11 employing standard Web browsers. 12 Mail Server 13 [0080] A mail server component 521 is a stored program component that is 14 executed by a CPU 503. The mail server may be an Internet mail server such as, but not 1s limited to Apple's Mail Server (3), dovecot, sendmail, Microsoft Exchange, and/or the 16 like. The mail server may allow for the execution of program components through 17 facilities such as ASP, ActiveX, (ANSI) (Objective-) C (++), C# and/or .NET, CGI scripts, 18 Java, JavaScript, PERL, PHP, pipes, Python, WebObjects, and/or the like. The mail 19 server may support communications protocols such as, but not limited to: Internet 20 message access protocol (IMAP), Messaging Application Programming Interface 21 (MAPI)/Microsoft Exchange, post office protocol (POP3), simple mail transfer protocol 22 (SMTP), and/or the like. The mail server can route, forward, and process incoming and WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 43 1 outgoing mail messages that have been sent, relayed and/or otherwise traversing 2 through and/or to the SMS. 3 [o o81] Access to the SMS mail may be achieved through a number of APIs offered 4 by the individual Web server components and/or the operating system. 5 [0 0 8 2] Also, a mail server may contain, communicate, generate, obtain, and/or 6 provide program component, system, user, and/or data communications, requests, 7 information, and/or responses. 8 Mail Client 9 [0083] A mail client component 522 is a stored program component that is 1o executed by a CPU 503. The mail client may be a mail viewing application such as Apple 11 (Mobile) Mail, Microsoft Entourage, Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft Outlook Express, 12 Mozilla, Thunderbird, and/or the like. Mail clients may support a number of transfer 13 protocols, such as: IMAP, Microsoft Exchange, POP3, SMTP, and/or the like. A mail 14 client may communicate to and/or with other components in a component collection, 1s including itself, and/or facilities of the like. Most frequently, the mail client 16 communicates with mail servers, operating systems, other mail clients, and/or the like; 17 e.g., it may contain, communicate, generate, obtain, and/or provide program 18 component, system, user, and/or data communications, requests, information, and/or 19 responses. Generally, the mail client provides a facility to compose and transmit 20 electronic mail messages.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 44 1 Cryptographic Server 2 [0084] A cryptographic server component 520 is a stored program component 3 that is executed by a CPU 503, cryptographic processor 526, cryptographic processor 4 interface 527, cryptographic processor device 528, and/or the like. Cryptographic 5 processor interfaces will allow for expedition of encryption and/or decryption requests 6 by the cryptographic component; however, the cryptographic component, alternatively, 7 may run on a CPU. The cryptographic component allows for the encryption and/or 8 decryption of provided data. The cryptographic component allows for both symmetric 9 and asymmetric (e.g., Pretty Good Protection (PGP)) encryption and/or decryption. The 10 cryptographic component may employ cryptographic techniques such as, but not limited 11 to: digital certificates (e.g., X.5o9 authentication framework), digital signatures, dual 12 signatures, enveloping, password access protection, public key management, and/or the 13 like. The cryptographic component will facilitate numerous (encryption and/or 14 decryption) security protocols such as, but not limited to: checksum, Data Encryption 1s Standard (DES), Elliptical Curve Encryption (ECC), International Data Encryption 16 Algorithm (IDEA), Message Digest 5 (MD5, which is a one way hash operation), 17 passwords, Rivest Cipher (RC5), Rijndael, RSA (which is an Internet encryption and 18 authentication system that uses an algorithm developed in 1977 by Ron Rivest, Adi 19 Shamir, and Leonard Adleman), Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA), Secure Socket Layer 20 (SSL), Secure Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTIPS), and/or the like. Employing such 21 encryption security protocols, the SMS may encrypt all incoming and/or outgoing 22 communications and may serve as node within a virtual private network (VPN) with a 23 wider communications network. The cryptographic component facilitates the process of 24 "security authorization" whereby access to a resource is inhibited by a security protocol WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 45 1 wherein the cryptographic component effects authorized access to the secured resource. 2 In addition, the cryptographic component may provide unique identifiers of content, 3 e.g., employing and MD5 hash to obtain a unique signature for an digital audio file. A 4 cryptographic component may communicate to and/or with other components in a 5 component collection, including itself, and/or facilities of the like. The cryptographic 6 component supports encryption schemes allowing for the secure transmission of 7 information across a communications network to enable the SMS component to engage 8 in secure transactions if so desired. The cryptographic component facilitates the secure 9 accessing of resources on the SMS and facilitates the access of secured resources on 10 remote systems; i.e., it may act as a client and/or server of secured resources. Most 11 frequently, the cryptographic component communicates with information servers, 12 operating systems, other program components, and/or the like. The cryptographic 13 component may contain, communicate, generate, obtain, and/or provide program 14 component, system, user, and/or data communications, requests, and/or responses. 15 The SMS Database 16 [0085] The SMS database component 519 may be embodied in a database and its 17 stored data. The database is a stored program component, which is executed by the 18 CPU; the stored program component portion configuring the CPU to process the stored 19 data. The database may be any of a number of fault tolerant, relational, scalable, secure 20 database such as DB2, MySQL, Oracle, Sybase, and/or the like. Relational databases are 21 an extension of a flat file. Relational databases consist of a series of related tables. The 22 tables are interconnected via a key field. Use of the key field allows the combination of 23 the tables by indexing against the key field; i.e., the key fields act as dimensional pivot WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 46 1 points for combining information from various tables. Relationships generally identify 2 links maintained between tables by matching primary keys. Primary keys represent 3 fields that uniquely identify the rows of a table in a relational database. More precisely, 4 they uniquely identify rows of a table on the "one" side of a one-to-many relationship. 5 [o086] Alternatively, the SMS database may be implemented using various 6 standard data-structures, such as an array, hash, (linked) list, struct, structured text file 7 (e.g., XML), table, and/or the like. Such data-structures may be stored in memory 8 and/or in (structured) files. In another alternative, an object-oriented database may be 9 used, such as Frontier, ObjectStore, Poet, Zope, and/or the like. Object databases can 1o include a number of object collections that are grouped and/or linked together by 11 common attributes; they may be related to other object collections by some common 12 attributes. Object-oriented databases perform similarly to relational databases with the 13 exception that objects are not just pieces of data but may have other types of capabilities 14 encapsulated within a given object. If the SMS database is implemented as a data 1s structure, the use of the SMS database 519 may be integrated into another component 16 such as the SMS component 535. Also, the database may be implemented as a mix of 17 data structures, objects, and relational structures. Databases may be consolidated 18 and/or distributed in countless variations through standard data processing techniques. 19 Portions of databases, e.g., tables, may be exported and/or imported and thus 20 decentralized and/or integrated. 21 [0087] In one embodiment, the database component 519 includes several tables 22 519a-l. A Users table 519a may include fields such as, but not limited to: userid, ssn, 23 dob, firstname, lastname, age, state, addressfirstline, addresssecondline, zipcode, WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 47 1 deviceslist, contactinfo, contacttype, altcontactinfo, altcontact type, 2 userbiometrics, and/or the like. The Users table may support and/or track multiple 3 entity accounts on a SMS. A Devices table 519b may include fields such as, but not 4 limited to: deviceID, devicename, deviceIP, deviceMAC, device type, 5 devicemodel, deviceversion, deviceOS, device-apps list, devicesecurekey, 6 wallet-app-installedflag, device_browser, device-plugin list, device_fontlist, 7 device_screensize, device_timezone, and/or the like. An Apps table 519c may 8 include fields such as, but not limited to: appID, app-name, app type, 9 app-dependencies, and/or the like. An Accounts table 519d may include fields such as, 1o but not limited to: accountnumber, accountsecurity-code, accountname, 11 issuer acquirer-flag, issuername, acquirer-name, accountaddress, routing-number, 12 accessAPIcall, linkedwalletslist, and/or the like. A Merchants table 519e may 13 include fields such as, but not limited to: merchantid, merchantname, 14 merchantaddress, ip-address, macaddress, authkey, port-num, 1s security-settings-list, and/or the like. An Issuers table 519f may include fields such as, 16 but not limited to: issuerid, issuername, issueraddress, ip-address, macaddress, 17 auth key, portnum, security-settings-list, and/or the like. An Acquirers table 519g 18 may include fields such as, but not limited to: acquirerid, accountfirstname, 19 accountlastname, account-type, accountnum, account_ balance_list, billingaddress_ 20 line, billingaddress_ line2, billingzipcode, billing-state, shipping-preferences, 21 shippingaddressline1, shippingaddressline2, shipping_ zipcode, shipping-state, 22 and/or the like. A Pay Gateways table 519h may include fields such as, but not limited 23 to: gatewayID, gatewayIP, gatewayMAC, gateway-secure key, gateway-accesslist, 24 gatewayAPI-calllist, gatewayserviceslist, and/or the like. A Transactions table WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 48 1 519i may include fields such as, but not limited to: orderid, userid, timestamp, 2 transactioncost, purchase detailslist, num products, products-list, product type, 3 product-paramslist, product-title, product-summary, quantity, userid, clientid, 4 client ip, client type, clientmodel, operating-system, osversion, app-installedflag, 5 userid, accountfirstname, accountlastname, account-type, accountnum, 6 account priority-accountratio, billingaddresslinel, billingaddressline2, 7 billingzipcode, billing-state, shipping-preferences, shippingaddressline1, 8 shippingaddressline2, shipping_ zipcode, shipping-state, merchantid, 9 merchantname, merchantauth key, and/or the like. A Batches table 519j may 1o include fields such as, but not limited to: batchid, transactionidlist, timestamp-list, 11 cleared flag list, clearancetrigger settings, and/or the like. A Decoded Code 12 Contents table 519k may include fields such as, but not limited to: codeid, timestamp, 13 linkid, appid, scripts-id, linksblacklist, linkswhitelist, appsblacklist, 14 linkswhitelist, and/or the like. A Products table 5191 may include fields such as, but 1s not limited to: productID, product-title, productattributeslist, product-price, 16 taxinfolist, related-products_ list, offerslist, discountslist, rewardslist, 17 merchantslist, merchantavailability list, and/or the like. A Digital Signatures table 18 519m may include fields such as, but not limited to: digital-signID, 19 digital-sign whitelist, digital-sign blacklist, plugins list, fontslist, timezones, 20 screensize, flashid, user-agentid, and/or the like. 21 [o 088] In one embodiment, the SMS database may interact with other database 22 systems. For example, employing a distributed database system, queries and data access 23 by search SMS component may treat the combination of the SMS database, an 24 integrated data security layer database as a single database entity.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 49 1 [o089] In one embodiment, user programs may contain various user interface 2 primitives, which may serve to update the SMS. Also, various accounts may require 3 custom database tables depending upon the environments and the types of clients the 4 SMS may need to serve. It should be noted that any unique fields may be designated as a 5 key field throughout. In an alternative embodiment, these tables have been 6 decentralized into their own databases and their respective database controllers (i.e., 7 individual database controllers for each of the above tables). Employing standard data 8 processing techniques, one may further distribute the databases over several computer 9 systemizations and/or storage devices. Similarly, configurations of the decentralized 10 database controllers may be varied by consolidating and/or distributing the various 11 database components 519a-1. The SMS may be configured to keep track of various 12 settings, inputs, and parameters via database controllers. 13 [oo9o] The SMS database may communicate to and/or with other components in 14 a component collection, including itself, and/or facilities of the like. Most frequently, the 1s SMS database communicates with the SMS component, other program components, 16 and/or the like. The database may contain, retain, and provide information regarding 17 other nodes and data. 18 The SMSs 19 [0091] The SMS component 535 is a stored program component that is executed 20 by a CPU. In one embodiment, the SMS component incorporates any and/or all 21 combinations of the aspects of the SMS discussed in the previous figures. As such, the 22 SMS affects accessing, obtaining and the provision of information, services, 23 transactions, and/or the like across various communications networks.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 50 1 [0092] The SMS component may provide verification, access and security, via 2 SMS components, to virtual wallet based electronic financial transactions. In one 3 embodiment, the SMS component 535 takes inputs (e.g., code snapshot input 1o9; 4 security verification request 111; purchase checkout request 202; wallet access 5 authorization request 204; and/or the like) etc., and transforms the inputs via various 6 components (e.g., DCDV 523; DCPV 524; UIV 525; and/or the like), into outputs (e.g., 7 verified code contents n7; purchase checkout response 203; wallet authorization 210; 8 and/or the like). 9 [0093] The SMS component enabling access of information between nodes may 10 be developed by employing standard development tools and languages such as, but not 11 limited to: Apache components, Assembly, ActiveX, binary executables, (ANSI) 12 (Objective-) C (++), C# and/or .NET, database adapters, CGI scripts, Java, JavaScript, 13 mapping tools, procedural and object oriented development tools, PERL, PHP, Python, 14 shell scripts, SQL commands, web application server extensions, web development 1s environments and libraries (e.g., Microsoft's ActiveX; Adobe AIR, FLEX & FLASH; 16 AJAX; (D)HTML; Dojo, Java; JavaScript; jQuery(UI); MooTools; Prototype; 17 script.aculo.us; Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP); SWFObject; Yahoo! User 18 Interface; and/or the like), WebObjects, and/or the like. In one embodiment, the SMS 19 server employs a cryptographic server to encrypt and decrypt communications. The 20 SMS component may communicate to and/or with other components in a component 21 collection, including itself, and/or facilities of the like. Most frequently, the SMS 22 component communicates with the SMS database, operating systems, other program 23 components, and/or the like. The SMS may contain, communicate, generate, obtain, WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 51 1 and/or provide program component, system, user, and/or data communications, 2 requests, and/or responses. 3 Distributed SMSs 4 [0094] The structure and/or operation of any of the SMS node controller 5 components may be combined, consolidated, and/or distributed in any number of ways 6 to facilitate development and/or deployment. Similarly, the component collection may 7 be combined in any number of ways to facilitate deployment and/or development. To 8 accomplish this, one may integrate the components into a common code base or in a 9 facility that can dynamically load the components on demand in an integrated fashion. 10 [0095] The component collection may be consolidated and/or distributed in 11 countless variations through standard data processing and/or development techniques. 12 Multiple instances of any one of the program components in the program component 13 collection may be instantiated on a single node, and/or across numerous nodes to 14 improve performance through load-balancing and/or data-processing techniques. 1s Furthermore, single instances may also be distributed across multiple controllers 16 and/or storage devices; e.g., databases. All program component instances and 17 controllers working in concert may do so through standard data processing 18 communication techniques. 19 [0096] The configuration of the SMS controller will depend on the context of 20 system deployment. Factors such as, but not limited to, the budget, capacity, location, 21 and/or use of the underlying hardware resources may affect deployment requirements 22 and configuration. Regardless of if the configuration results in more consolidated 23 and/or integrated program components, results in a more distributed series of program WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 52 1 components, and/or results in some combination between a consolidated and 2 distributed configuration, data may be communicated, obtained, and/or provided. 3 Instances of components consolidated into a common code base from the program 4 component collection may communicate, obtain, and/or provide data. This may be 5 accomplished through intra-application data processing communication techniques 6 such as, but not limited to: data referencing (e.g., pointers), internal messaging, object 7 instance variable communication, shared memory space, variable passing, and/or the 8 like. 9 [0097] If component collection components are discrete, separate, and/or 1o external to one another, then communicating, obtaining, and/or providing data with 11 and/or to other components may be accomplished through inter-application data 12 processing communication techniques such as, but not limited to: Application Program 13 Interfaces (API) information passage; (distributed) Component Object Model 14 ((D)COM), (Distributed) Object Linking and Embedding ((D)OLE), and/or the like), 1s Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), Jini local and remote 16 application program interfaces, JavaScript Object Notation (JSON), Remote Method 17 Invocation (RMI), SOAP, process pipes, shared files, and/or the like. Messages sent 18 between discrete component components for inter-application communication or within 19 memory spaces of a singular component for intra-application communication may be 20 facilitated through the creation and parsing of a grammar. A grammar may be 21 developed by using development tools such as lex, yacc, XML, and/or the like, which 22 allow for grammar generation and parsing capabilities, which in turn may form the basis 23 of communication messages within and between components.
WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 53 1 [o098] For example, a grammar may be arranged to recognize the tokens of an 2 HTTP post command, e.g.: 3 w3c -post http:// ... Valuel 4 5 [oo99] where Value1 is discerned as being a parameter because "http://" is part of 6 the grammar syntax, and what follows is considered part of the post value. Similarly, 7 with such a grammar, a variable "Valuei" may be inserted into an "http://" post 8 command and then sent. The grammar syntax itself may be presented as structured data 9 that is interpreted and/or otherwise used to generate the parsing mechanism (e.g., a 10 syntax description text file as processed by lex, yacc, etc.). Also, once the parsing 11 mechanism is generated and/or instantiated, it itself may process and/or parse 12 structured data such as, but not limited to: character (e.g., tab) delineated text, HTML, 13 structured text streams, XML, and/or the like structured data. In another embodiment, 14 inter-application data processing protocols themselves may have integrated and/or 1s readily available parsers (e.g., JSON, SOAP, and/or like parsers) that may be employed 16 to parse (e.g., communications) data. Further, the parsing grammar may be used 17 beyond message parsing, but may also be used to parse: databases, data collections, data 18 stores, structured data, and/or the like. Again, the desired configuration will depend 19 upon the context, environment, and requirements of system deployment. 20 [00100] For example, in some implementations, the SMS controller may be 21 executing a PHP script implementing a Secure Sockets Layer ("SSL") socket server via 22 the information server, which listens to incoming communications on a server port to 23 which a client may send data, e.g., data encoded in JSON format. Upon identifying an 24 incoming communication, the PHP script may read the incoming message from the WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 54 1 client device, parse the received JSON-encoded text data to extract information from the 2 JSON-encoded text data into PHP script variables, and store the data (e.g., client 3 identifying information, etc.) and/or extracted information in a relational database 4 accessible using the Structured Query Language ("SQL"). An exemplary listing, written 5 substantially in the form of PHP/SQL commands, to accept JSON-encoded input data 6 from a client device via a SSL connection, parse the data to extract variables, and store 7 the data to a database, is provided below: 8 <?PHP 9 header('Content-Type: text/plain'); 10 11 // set ip address and port to listen to for incoming data 12 $address = '192.168.0.100'; 13 $port = 255; 14 15 // create a server-side SSL socket, listen for/accept incoming communication 16 $sock = socketcreate(AFINET, SOCKSTREAM, 0); 17 socketbind($sock, $address, $port) or die('Could not bind to address'); 18 socketlisten($sock); 19 $client = socketaccept($sock); 20 21 // read input data from client device in 1024 byte blocks until end of message 22 do { 23 $input = 24 $input = socketread($client, 1024); 25 $data .= $input; 26 1 while($input 27 28 // parse data to extract variables 29 $obj = jsondecode($data, true); 30 31 // store input data in a database 32 mysql-connect("201.408.185.132",$DBserver,$password); // access database server 33 mysql-select("CLIENTDB.SQL"); // select database to append 34 mysql-query("INSERT INTO UserTable (transmission) 35 VALUES ($data)"); // add data to UserTable table in a CLIENT database 36 mysqlclose("CLIENTDB.SQL"); // close connection to database WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 55 1 ?> 2 3 [o0101] Also, the following resources may be used to provide example 4 embodiments regarding SOAP parser implementation: 5 http://www.xav.com/perl/site/lib/SOAP/Parser.html 6 http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/tivihelp/v2rl/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm 7 IBMDI.doc/referenceguide295.htm 8 9 [ 0 0 10 2] and other parser implementations: 10 http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/tivihelp/v2rl/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm 11 IBMDI.doc/referenceguide259.htm 12 13 [00103] all of which are hereby expressly incorporated by reference herein. 14 [00104] In order to address various issues and advance the art, the entirety of this 1s application for SNAP MOBILE SECURITY APPARATUSES, METHODS AND SYSTEMS 16 (including the Cover Page, Title, Headings, Field, Background, Summary, Brief 17 Description of the Drawings, Detailed Description, Claims, Abstract, Figures, 18 Appendices and/or otherwise) shows, by way of illustration, various example 19 embodiments in which the claimed innovations may be practiced. The advantages and 20 features of the application are of a representative sample of embodiments only, and are 21 not exhaustive and/or exclusive. They are presented only to assist in understanding and 22 teach the claimed principles. It should be understood that they are not representative of 23 all claimed innovations. As such, certain aspects of the disclosure have not been 24 discussed herein. That alternate embodiments may not have been presented for a 25 specific portion of the innovations or that further undescribed alternate embodiments 26 may be available for a portion is not to be considered a disclaimer of those alternate 27 embodiments. It will be appreciated that many of those undescribed embodiments WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 56 1 incorporate the same principles of the innovations and others are equivalent. Thus, it is 2 to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and functional, logical, 3 operational, organizational, structural and/or topological modifications may be made 4 without departing from the scope and/or spirit of the disclosure. As such, all examples 5 and/or embodiments are deemed to be non-limiting throughout this disclosure. Also, no 6 inference should be drawn regarding those embodiments discussed herein relative to 7 those not discussed herein other than it is as such for purposes of reducing space and 8 repetition. For instance, it is to be understood that the logical and/or topological 9 structure of any combination of any data flow sequence(s), program components (a 10 component collection), other components, and/or any present feature sets as described 11 in the figures and/or throughout are not limited to a fixed operating order and/or 12 arrangement, but rather, any disclosed order is exemplary and all equivalents, 13 regardless of order, are contemplated by the disclosure. Furthermore, it is to be 14 understood that such features are not limited to serial execution, but rather, any 1s number of threads, processes, processors, services, servers, and/or the like that may 16 execute asynchronously, concurrently, in parallel, simultaneously, synchronously, 17 and/or the like also are contemplated by the disclosure. As such, some of these features 18 may be mutually contradictory, in that they cannot be simultaneously present in a single 19 embodiment. Similarly, some features are applicable to one aspect of the innovations, 20 and inapplicable to others. In addition, the disclosure includes other innovations not 21 presently claimed. Applicant reserves all rights in those presently unclaimed 22 innovations, including the right to claim such innovations, file additional applications, 23 continuations, continuations-in-part, divisions, and/or the like thereof. As such, it 24 should be understood that advantages, embodiments, examples, functional, features, WO 2014/145708 PCT/US2014/030517 57 1 logical, operational, organizational, structural, topological, and/or other aspects of the 2 disclosure are not to be considered limitations on the disclosure as defined by the claims 3 or limitations on equivalents to the claims. It is to be understood that, depending on the 4 particular needs and/or characteristics of a SMS individual and/or enterprise user, 5 database configuration and/or relational model, data type, data transmission and/or 6 network framework, syntax structure, and/or the like, various embodiments of the SMS 7 may be implemented that allow a great deal of flexibility and customization. For 8 example, aspects of the SMS may be adapted for securing online shopping, information 9 exchange and processing, and/or the like. While various embodiments and discussions 10 of the SMS have been directed to electronic purchase transactions, however, it is to be 11 understood that the embodiments described herein may be readily configured and/or 12 customized for a wide variety of other applications and/or implementations. 13
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