AU2008205426B2 - A Solar Heating System for a building - Google Patents

A Solar Heating System for a building Download PDF

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Publication number
AU2008205426B2
AU2008205426B2 AU2008205426A AU2008205426A AU2008205426B2 AU 2008205426 B2 AU2008205426 B2 AU 2008205426B2 AU 2008205426 A AU2008205426 A AU 2008205426A AU 2008205426 A AU2008205426 A AU 2008205426A AU 2008205426 B2 AU2008205426 B2 AU 2008205426B2
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Australia
Prior art keywords
building
heating
box
outlet
heat collection
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AU2008205426A
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AU2008205426A1 (en
Inventor
Ronald Paterson Knight
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Knight Lorenza
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Knight Lorenza
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Publication date
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Priority to AU2008205426A priority Critical patent/AU2008205426B2/en
Publication of AU2008205426A1 publication Critical patent/AU2008205426A1/en
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Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D5/00Hot-air central heating systems; Exhaust gas central heating systems
    • F24D5/005Hot-air central heating systems; Exhaust gas central heating systems combined with solar energy
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D5/00Hot-air central heating systems; Exhaust gas central heating systems
    • F24D5/02Hot-air central heating systems; Exhaust gas central heating systems operating with discharge of hot air into the space or area to be heated
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S10/00Solar heat collectors using working fluids
    • F24S10/50Solar heat collectors using working fluids the working fluids being conveyed between plates
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B10/00Integration of renewable energy sources in buildings
    • Y02B10/20Solar thermal
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/40Solar thermal energy, e.g. solar towers
    • Y02E10/44Heat exchange systems

Abstract

Abstract A heating system for a building, the system including at least one roof mounted heat collection assembly with an air inlet and a warm air outlet, ducting connecting the warm air outlet of the assembly and a ceiling outlet located in a ceiling 5 of the building to transport warm air from the heat collection assembly to the ceiling outlet, and a flow control valve located in the ducting to control flow of the warm air through the ducting. r1/1

Description

AUSTRALIA Patents Act 1990 COMPLETE SPECIFICATION Invention Title: A Solar Heating System for a Building Applicant: Ronald Paterson Knight; Lorenza Knight The invention is described in the following statement: 2 A SOLAR HEATING SYSTEM FOR A BUILDING Field of the Invention. The present invention relates to heating systems and particularly to heating systems used to warm enclosed areas such as buildings or rooms within 5 buildings. Background Art. Solar heating harnesses solar radiation emitted by the sun to provide solar thermal energy for various different domestic and commercial uses including solar hot water, solar space heating, and solar pool heaters. Among their attributes, 10 solar heating systems conserve energy, reduce utility costs, and produce clean energy. Generally, solar heating systems convert solar radiation into usable or sensible heat. To that end, many conventional solar heating systems utilize a large area collector for absorbing heat from the solar radiation. The absorbed sensible heat is transferred to a fluid, which is subsequently transferred to the ventilated space inside a building. 15 Many solar heat collection systems are based on the collection of energy to be transformed into electricity using photovoltaic arrays, the electricity then used to power heating equipment. Ventilation air ducts are usually made of sheet metal that carry cooled or heated air to all rooms of a building. It is well known in the art that ventilation 20 ducts often have to be installed on the roofs because it is inconvenient to have them inside the building for space limitations, cost or other reasons. Exposed outside ducts are expensive to mount. Sections of ventilation air ducts must be fabricated and hoisted on the roof or they may have to be built on site. It is also well known that once on the roof, the sections are mounted on brackets tighten on a system of 25 mounting brackets and/or lay on wooden beams on a flat roof. The anchoring of the sections is time consuming since the mounting brackets and/or beams need to be installed first and then the sections need to be anchored to the mounting brackets and/or beams. It would therefore be advantageous to provide a lightweight, easily 30 installed, efficient but still cost effective heating system. It will be clearly understood that, if a prior art publication is referred to herein, this reference does not constitute an admission that the publication forms part 3 of the common general knowledge in the art in Australia or in any other country. Summary of the Invention. The present invention is directed to a heating system for a building, which may at least partially overcome at least one of the abovementioned 5 disadvantages or provide the consumer with a useful or commercial choice. With the foregoing in view, the present invention in one form, resides broadly in a heating system for a building, the system including at least one roof mounted heat collection assembly with an air inlet and a warm air outlet, ducting connecting the warm air outlet of the assembly and a ceiling outlet located in a ceiling 10 of the building to transport warm air from the heat collection assembly to the ceiling outlet, and a flow control valve located in the ducting to control flow of the warm air through the ducting. The system of the present invention provides not only heating for a building but also ventilation due to the flow of air into and typically through the 15 building. The system of the present invention will normally have an associated or integral control system. There will normally be at least one control interface located within the building. The building may be divided into one or more zones and control interfaces may be provided for each or alternatively a single control interface 20 with links to each zone may be provided. The control system will also preferably include a control box containing the bulk of the operating system of the control system. The control box will normally be linked to the control interface(s) using appropriate wiring or connection means. The link may alternatively be a wireless link although this is less 25 preferred. The control box will normally be located above the ceiling of the building. The system may further include one or more temperature probes to provide feedback regarding temperature fluctuations or levels within the building or zones. The control system will normally be linked to the control valve to 30 allow a user to adjust the amount of warm air allowed into the building and to thereby adjust the temperature. There will typically be an associated actuator to change the 4 position of the valve within the ducting to allow more or less warm air through the duct (or none). The control system may also be connected to the fan either in conjunction with the control valve or instead of the control valve, normally both. The 5 control system may therefore be used to adjust the control valve, the fan speed or both. Another important function of the valve located in the ducting is to prevent the escape of air backwards through the system. The system includes at least one and normally more than one roof mounted heat collection assembly. Each heat collection assembly is normally 10 configured as an inlet heat box and an outlet heat box. Each box will typically be a flattened substantially rectangular shape to maximise surface area and to minimise the depth of each. Each box will be substantially sealed as they will each typically contain and direct air into the ducting. The operation of the system is that air is typically drawn into the heat 15 boxes and heated by the sun whilst contained. The system will then either draw or drive the air into the ducting through convective forces or a fan can be provided to force air through the system. Each heat collection box will preferably be mounted on an upper or outer surface of the roof of the building in order to be in direct sunlight as much as 20 possible. Heliostat assemblies may be provided to track the sun's movement to maximise the heat energy used. Normally the inlet box of each assembly will be provided toward a lower edge of the roof with the outlet box toward the upper or inner portion of the roof. Alternatively, the heat boxes can be oriented across the roof. Normally the 25 warm air outlet from the collection assembly will be located at an upper portion. There will normally be at least one and preferably a plurality of openings between the inlet and outlet boxes in each assembly. Typically, each box will have an upper and an opposed lower wall, a pair of opposed sidewalls and a pair of opposed end walls. Respective end walls of the lower and upper boxes will 30 normally have the openings therethrough, preferably the lower end wall of the outlet box and the upper end wall of the inlet box, allowing a flow of air from the inlet box to the outlet box.
5 There will typically be a gasket or other sealing means located between the respective end walls. Each assembly will normally have at least one fan associated therewith. Preferably the fan will be provided in a weatherproof enclosure and 5 normally towards the lower end of the inlet box. A sealing gasket may be provided between the fan enclosure and the inlet box. The fan is preferably provided as a sealed unit to move air through the system. As mentioned above, the fan will normally be connected to the control unit. One or more intermediate boxes may be provided between the inlet and 10 outlet boxes. This may lengthen the path between the inlet to the system and the warm air outlet to heat the air to a sufficient level or further than simply an inlet and an outlet box without intermediate boxes. The warm air outlet from the heat collection assembly is typically located at an upper portion of the outlet box of each assembly. Without wishing to be 15 limited by theory, warm air tends to rise due to convective forces and thus the location of the warm air outlet and the orientation or angle upon which the heat collection assembly is located, may act without the fan in operation to move air through the system. A capillary type action may therefore draw fresh air into the system for heating. 20 The warm air outlet is normally located in one of the upper corners of the outlet box. The ducting provided may be simple or complex, rigid, flexible or a combination. The heat collection assembly will normally be located on the upper surface of the roof of the building and the ducting is provided to transport the heated 25 air to the interior of the building. Normally the ducting will be insulated and as short as possible to minimise heat losses as the warm air travels to the interior of the building. The system may include multiple heat collection assemblies. Of course larger or more complex systems may be used for larger buildings. There may 30 be a single fan for each assembly or one fan for each system. The boxes may be manufactured of any materials. The upper wall of each of the boxes may be clear or opaque. It may be manufactured of toughened glass 6 or plastic for example. The entire boxes will preferably be manufactured of high heat conductive materials. They may include a support frame or not depending upon the size of the boxes. The heat collection assembly of the system of the present invention is 5 preferably manufactured in light, modular sections that can be easily hoisted and installed on a flat roof of a building. Brief Description of the Drawings. Various embodiments of the invention will be described with reference to the following drawings, in which: 10 Figure 1 is a perspective schematic view of a system according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Detailed Description of the Preferred Embodiment. According to a preferred embodiment, a heating system for a building is provided. 15 The heating system 10 for a building (not shown) illustrated in Figure 1 includes a single roof mounted heat collection assembly with an air inlet 11 and a warm air outlet 12. Ducting 13 connects the warm air outlet 12 of the roof mounted assembly with a ceiling outlet 14 located in the ceiling of the building to transport warm air from the heat collection assembly to the ceiling outlet 14. A flow control 20 valve 15 is located in the ducting 13 to control flow of the warm air through the ducting 13. The heat collection assembly of the illustrated embodiment is configured as an inlet heat box 16 and an outlet heat box 17. Each box has a flattened, substantially rectangular shape to maximise the surface area presented to 25 the sun and to minimise the depth of the boxes. The operation of the system is that air is typically drawn into the inlet heat box 16 and heated by the sun whilst contained. The system then drives the air into the ducting 13 via the outlet heat box 17. The heat collection assembly including the two heat boxes 16, 17 is 30 mounted on an upper or outer surface of the roof of the building in order to be in direct sunlight as much as possible.
7 Normally, the inlet box 16 and outlet box of each assembly is provided substantially horizontally, that is, parallel with the ridge of the roof. The warm air outlet 12 from the collection assembly is located at an upper portion of the outlet heat box 17 in the illustrated embodiment. 5 There is a plurality of openings 20 between the inlet 16 and outlet boxes 17 in each assembly. Due to their rectangular shape, each box has an upper and an opposed lower wall, a pair of opposed sidewalls and a pair of opposed end walls. Respective end walls of the lower and upper boxes have openings therethrough, namely the lower end wall of the outlet box 17 and the upper end wall of the inlet box 10 16, allowing a flow of air from the inlet box 16 to the outlet box 17. This configuration is illustrated in Figure 1. There is a gasket 21 located between the respective end walls. In the illustrated embodiment, a fan is provided to force air through the system. The fan of the illustrated embodiment is provided in a weatherproof enclosure 15 18 fixed to the inlet box 16 at the end of the inlet box 16 opposite the outlet box 17. A sealing gasket 19 is provided between the fan enclosure 18 and the inlet box 16. According to the illustrated embodiment, the warm air outlet 12 from the outlet heat box 17 is located at an upper portion of the outlet box 17, normally in one of the upper corners of the outlet box 17 as illustrated. 20 The ducting 13 provided is flexible and transports the heated air from the roof mounted assembly to the interior of the building. Normally, the ducting 13 is insulated and as short as possible to minimise heat losses as the warm air travels to the interior of the building. The ducting is illustrated in schematic form in Figure 1. The system has an associated control system including at least one 25 control interface 22 located within the building. The control system also includes a control box 23 containing the bulk of the operating system of the control system, located above the ceiling of the building. The control box 23 is linked to the control interface(s) using appropriate wiring 24 or connection means. The illustrated system further includes at least one temperature probe 30 25 to provide feedback regarding temperature fluctuations or levels within the outlet box 17.
8 The control system is linked to the control valve 15 to allow a user to adjust the amount of warm air allowed into the building and to thereby adjust the temperature. In the present specification and claims (if any), the word "comprising" 5 and its derivatives including "comprises" and "comprise" include each of the stated integers but does not exclude the inclusion of one or more further integers. Reference throughout this specification to "one embodiment" or "an embodiment" means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment is included in at least one embodiment of the present 10 invention. Thus, the appearance of the phrases "in one embodiment" or "in an embodiment" in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment. Furthermore, the particular features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more combinations. In compliance with the statute, the invention has been described in 15 language more or less specific to structural or methodical features. It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to specific features shown or described since the means herein described comprises preferred forms of putting the invention into effect. The invention is, therefore, claimed in any of its forms or modifications within the proper scope of the appended claims (if any) appropriately interpreted by 20 those skilled in the art.

Claims (18)

1. A heating system for a building, the system including at least one heat collection box mounted externally of the building above the roof, the heat collection box having an air inlet to intake air to be warmed into the heat collection box from 5 above the roof and a warm air outlet, ducting connecting the warm air outlet of the heat collection box and a ceiling outlet located in a ceiling of the building to transport warm air from the heat collection box to the ceiling outlet, and a flow control valve located in the ducting to control flow of the warm air through the ducting and prevent the escape of warm air backwards through the system. 10
2. A heating system for a building as claimed in claim 1 wherein the system also provides ventilation due to the flow of air into the building.
3. A heating system for a building as claimed in claim 1 or claim 2 including an associated control system.
4. A heating system for a building as claimed in claim 3 including at least one 15 control interface located within the building.
5. A heating system for a building as claimed in claim 3 or claim 4 including a control box containing the bulk of the operating system of the control system located above the ceiling of the building.
6. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of claims 3 to 5 including 20 one or more temperature probes to provide feedback regarding temperature fluctuations within ducting.
7. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of claims 3 to 6 wherein the control system is linked to the control valve to allow a user to adjust the amount of warm air allowed into the building and prevent backflow of air from 25 the building.
8. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein each heat collection assembly is configured as an inlet heat box and an outlet heat box.
9. A heating system for a building as claimed in claim 8 wherein each box has a 30 flattened substantially rectangular shape to maximise surface area and to minimise the depth of the box.
10. A heating system for a building as claimed in claim 8 or claim 9 wherein each 10 heat collection box is mounted on an outer surface of the roof of the building in order to be in direct sunlight as much as possible.
11. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of claims 8 to 10 wherein the inlet box of each assembly is oriented across the roof. 5
12. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of claims 8 to 11 wherein each box has an upper and an opposed lower wall, a pair of opposed sidewalls and a pair of opposed end walls and respective end walls of the inlet and outlet boxes have at least one opening therethrough, allowing a flow of air from the inlet box to the outlet box. 10
13. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of claims 8 to 12 wherein one or more intermediate boxes are provided between the inlet and outlet boxes.
14. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein each heat collection assembly has at least one fan associated therewith.
15. A heating system for a building as claimed in claim 14 wherein the at least one 15 fan is provided in a weatherproof enclosure on the roof attached to heat collection assembly.
16. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the warm air outlet from the heat collection assembly is located in one of the corners of the outlet box. 20
17. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the ducting is flexible.
18. A heating system for a building as claimed in any one of the preceding claims wherein the at least one heat collection assembly is manufactured in light, modular sections that can be easily hoisted and installed on a roof of a building. 25
AU2008205426A 2008-08-14 2008-08-14 A Solar Heating System for a building Active AU2008205426B2 (en)

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AU2008205426A AU2008205426B2 (en) 2008-08-14 2008-08-14 A Solar Heating System for a building

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2008205426A AU2008205426B2 (en) 2008-08-14 2008-08-14 A Solar Heating System for a building

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AU2008205426A1 AU2008205426A1 (en) 2010-03-04
AU2008205426B2 true AU2008205426B2 (en) 2016-03-31

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Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20210317996A1 (en) * 2018-07-31 2021-10-14 Dale P. Schneider Solar space heating collector

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4478210A (en) * 1979-04-16 1984-10-23 Sieradski Leonard M Solar heating system
US4497311A (en) * 1982-08-26 1985-02-05 Brandenburg Jr Frank J Sun tracking solar air heating system
JPS6124946A (en) * 1984-07-12 1986-02-03 Natl House Ind Co Ltd Solar heat collecting device

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4478210A (en) * 1979-04-16 1984-10-23 Sieradski Leonard M Solar heating system
US4497311A (en) * 1982-08-26 1985-02-05 Brandenburg Jr Frank J Sun tracking solar air heating system
JPS6124946A (en) * 1984-07-12 1986-02-03 Natl House Ind Co Ltd Solar heat collecting device

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